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MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN 
BULLETIN 



. 71 

i 



1983 



Ml >URI 

CJAKDBN UBRARjC 



m Y ^ 




Volume LXXI, Number 1 
February 1983 

Includes Calendar for February/March 1983 



Missouri 

Botanical 

Garden 

Bulletin 



Bits and Pieces; Scraps of Paper 

Hotel bills. A restaurant check 
for lunch. A currency exchange 
receipt (£90 for 2268 francs). We 
would not save these things, 
these scraps of paper. Oh per- 
haps we would keep them a few 
weeks, until the credit card bills 
came in so that we could recon- 
cile them but we surely would 
not save them ourselves for 38 
years — along with every check 
we wrote, every receipt for a doc- 
tor's visit, picture frame repair, 
groceries — the minutiae of life — 
and then pass them on to the 
care of succeeding generations. 

But Henry Shaw saved them. 
And the Missouri Botanical Gar- 
den preserves all of these 
checks and restaurant bills and 
receipts for subscriptions to the 
Missouri Republican in its ar- 
chives. 

Until recently, our idea of an 
archives came from a visit, as 
part of a grade-school class trip, 
to the National archives in Wash- 
ington, D.C. in which were ex- 
hibited, in glass cases, copies of 
the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence, the Bill of Rights, and the 
Articles of Confederation. The 
word archives meant (for us) a 
place in which significant histor- 
ical documents were displayed for visitors; a public museum 
of paperwork. 

Not so. In the Missouri Botanical Garden Archives are 
3,348 blueprints, 6,447 sheet maps, 194 group portraits, 706 
individual portraits, 2,229 magic lantern slides, 5,555 pieces 
of artwork, 12,957 items in the papers of Henry Shaw, and 
19,529 documents in the papers of George Englemann. 

In all, there are nearly 145,000 items in the collection. Far 
from being a place for the exhibit of a handful of curious or 
significant documents, the Garden's archives are an impor- 
tant resource for historical reference. (Although several 
recent exhibits have been mounted using material from the 
archives, including an exhibit of the work of the late-nine- 
teenth century botanist-educator Sarah Frances Price, the 
historical display in the barrel vault of the Ridgway Center, 




and the extremely popular trav- 
eling exhibit, 500 Years of Botan- 
ical Illustration.) 

In the past nine months, 125 
people from 15 states — from 
Maine to New Mexico; from 
Washington to Virginia— and 5 
countries have used the ar- 
chives, engaged in various re- 
searches. 

Barbara Mykrantz, archivist 
since 1979 (she came to the Gar- 
den as a volunteer in 1976) 
keeps records of all who use the 
archives, and reads some of the 
entries to us: 

"A man from University Col- 
lege in England was doing a his- 
tory of greenhouses and used 
our glass plate negatives to de- 
termine how the design of Amer- 
ican greenhouses was influ- 
enced by those of England. 

"Someone developing a 
Master Plan for a small arbore- 
tum in Oregon used, as models, 
the several Master Plans the 
Garden has had in its history. 

"A young man from a prop- 
agation company in Illinois is 
using the Engelmann papers to 
determine what plants were col- 
lected near Beardstown, Illinois, 
in the mid-1800s so that he can 
preserve these species." 

The report goes on — people writing books, studying his- 
tory, researching business history (for a time, the Harvard 
School of Business had Henry Shaw's business papers since 
they considered them to be one of the finest, representative 
collections for merchants and banking history of the century), 
compiling biographies of prominent scientists. 

Among the important collections held in the archives are 
the papers of Henry Shaw, which include personal correspon- 
dence, business correspondence, cancelled checks, receipts 
for household goods and for business transactions, mem- 
orabilia (for example, a certificate proclaiming that on July 10, 
1840, Shaw passed behind Niagra Falls), and manuscripts 
Shaw wrote on historical subjects. The archives also hold the 
papers of George Engelmann, which include his voluminous 

(continued on page 4) 



Comment 



On January 19, the Missouri Botanical 
Garden, the St. Louis Zoo, The Saint Louis 
Art Museum, and the Museum of Science 
and Natural History presented requests to 
the St. Louis Zoo-Museum District to ask 
voters in St. Louis City and County, on 
April 5, for increases in property taxes for 
the support of these institutions. 

We will be asking voters to allow us to 
benefit from a tax of four cents per hundred dollars assessed 
valuation; as you know, the Garden does not now receive any 
direct tax support and is, in fact, the only major botanical 
garden in the world not to receive such support. 




The Zoo and the Art Museum are each asking for an addi 
tional tax of four cents per hundred dollars assessed valuatior 
over the four cents they each receive currently. The Science 
Museum is requesting an additional three cents over the one 
cent it already receives. 

These cultural institutions are essential to the quality of life 
we have in St. Louis. They are vital educational resources foi 
our schools as well as important sources of recreation anc 
edification for the general public. Last year, the Garden alone 
taught almost 50,000 students about biology, natural history 
and gardening. 

Our priorities for the use of these funds will be for majo 
repairs and renovations that are desperately needed in the 

(continued on page 4 



HENRY SHAW 


Mr and Mrs J. Eugene Johanson 


Mrs. Thomas W Shields 


Mrs. John Valle Janes, Sr. 


ASSOCIATES 


Mr and Mrs. Henry 0. Johnston 


Mrs. John M. Shoenberg 


Mr. and Mrs. Thorn Lewis 




Mr and Mrs Landon Y. Jones 


Mr and Mrs Robert H Shoenberg 


Mr. and Mrs. Eldrige Lovelace 


Anonymous 


Mr and Mrs. W. Boardman Jones, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs Sydney Shoenberg, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. James S. McDonnell III 


Mr and Mrs Adam Aronson 


Mrs. A. F. Kaeser 


Mr. and Mrs John E. Simon 


Mr. J. Ben Miller 


Mr. and Mrs Newell A. Auger 


Dr. and Mrs. John H. Kendig 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings Smith 


Mr. and Mrs. Shadrach F. Morris, Jr. 


Mrs. Agnes F. Baer 


Mr and Mrs Samuel M Kennard III 


Mrs. Tom K. Smith, Sr. 


Mr and Mrs. William L. Nussbaum 


Mr. and Mrs Howard F. Baer 


Mr. and Mrs. Elmer G. Kiefer 


Mr. and Mrs. Tom K. Smith, Jr. 


Mrs Harry E. Papin, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs Alexander M. Bakewell 


Mr A. P. Klose 


Mr. and Mrs Wallace H Smith 


Mrs. Jean M. Pennington 


Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Bakewell, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs William S. Knowles 


Mrs. Sylvia N. Souers 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Perry 


Mr. and Mrs. Clarence C Barksdale 


Mr and Mrs Robert E Kresko 


Mr. and Mrs C C Johnson Spink 


Mrs. Drue Wilson Philpott 


Mr. and Mrs Joseph H Bascom 


Mr. and Mrs. Hal A. Kroeger. Jr. 


Mrs. Hermann F. Spoehrer 


Mrs. Ralph F. Piper 


Mr and Mrs Carl L A. Beckers 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Lamy 


Mrs. Robert R. Stephens 


Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Richman 


Mr. and Mrs Brooks Bernhardt 


Mr. and Mrs. Oliver M Langenberg 


Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 


Mr. and Mrs Robert A Ridgway 


Mr and Mrs Albert G. Blanke, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Sam Langsdorf, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs 


Cornelius F. Stueck 


Mrs. Edward J. Riley, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. John G Buettner 


Mr. and Mrs. John C. Lathrop 


Mr. and Mrs 


Hampden Swift 


Mrs. John R. Ruhoff 


Mr. and Mrs. William H T Bush 


Mr. and Mrs. John C. Lebens 


Mr. and Mrs 


Edgar L. Taylor, Jr. 


Mr and Mrs. C. M. Ruprecht 


Mrs. J. Butler Bushyhead 


Mrs. John S. Lehmann 


Mr. and Mrs 


Charles L Tooker 


Safeco Insurance Company 


Mr. and Mrs. Jules D. Campbell 


Mr. and Mrs. Willard L. Levy 


Mr. and Mrs 


Joseph W. Towle 


Mr. Don R. Schneeberger 


Mrs. Jean-Jacques Carnal 


Mr. and Mrs. Max Lippman 


Mr. and Mrs 


Jack L. Turner 


Dr. and Mrs. John Schoentag 


Miss Adelaide Cherbonnier 


Mr. and Mrs. Stanley L. Lopata 


Mr. and Mrs 


Edward J Walsh, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Leon B. Strauss 


Mrs Fielding T. Childress 


Miss Martha Irene Love 


Mrs. Horton Watkins 


Miss Lillian L Stupp 


Mr. and Mrs. Fielding L. Childress 


Mr. and Mrs. H. Dean Mann 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Weil 


Mr. and Mrs. Harold E. Thayer 


Mr. and Mrs. Gary A. Close 


Mr and Mrs James A Maritz. Jr 


Mrs. S A. Wemtraub 


Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace. Jr 


Mr. Sidney S. Cohen 


Mr and Mrs. William E. Maritz 


Mr. and Mrs Ben H. Wells 


Watlow Electric Company 


Mr. and Mrs. Franklin J. Cornwell, Sr. 


Mr Harry B Mathews III 


Mr. and Mrs B. K Werner 


Mr Thomas L Wilson 


Dr. and Mrs. William H. Danforth 


Mr. and Mrs. Morton D. May 


Mr and Mrs O. Sage Wightman III 


Mr and Mrs. Don L. Wolfsberger 


Mr. and Mrs. Sam'l C. Davis 


Mrs. James S. McDonnell, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs Eugene F. Williams, Jr. 




Mr Alan E Doede 


Mr. and Mrs. Sanford N. McDonnell 


Mrs. John M. Wolff 


C. C. Johnson Spink 
President, Board of Trustees 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Dohack 


Mr. and Mrs. Roswell Messing, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Donald D. Wren 


Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Duhme, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. I. E. Millstone 


Miss F. A. Wuellner 




Mr. and Mrs. J. Robert Edwards 


Mr and Mrs Hubert C. Moog 


Mrs. Eugene F. Zimmerman 


Mrs. Shadrach F. Morris, Jr. 


Mr. William N. Eisendrath, Jr. 


Mr and Mrs. Thomas M. Moore 


Mr. and Mrs. Andrew R. Zinsmeyer 


President of the Executive 


Mr. and Mrs. David C. Farrell 


Mrs. W. Gillespie Moore 


Mr. and Mrs. Sander B Zwick 


Board of the Members 


Mrs. Mary Plant Faust 


Dr. and Mrs. Walter Moore 






Mrs. Clark P. Fiske 


Mr. and Mrs. Eric P. Newman 


DIRECTOR'S 


Dr. Peter H. Raven 


Mr. and Mrs Gregory D. Flotron 


Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 


Director j!S 


Mr. and Mrs Robert B Forbes 


Mr. and Mrs. C. W Oertli 


ASSOCIATES 


8^3 Member of 

w% The Arts and Education 


Mrs. Eugene A Freund 
Mrs. Henry L. Freund 


Mrs. John M. Olin 
Mr. Spencer T. Olin 


Anonymous 

Mr and Mrs. John W. Bachman 


Mr. S. E. Freund 


Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Orthwein, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. C. Perry Bascom 


Fund of Greater St. Louis 


Mrs. Clark R. Gamble 


Mrs. Elizabeth R. Pantaleoni 


Ms Allison R. Brightman 

Mr. and Mrs. H, Pharr Brightman 




Dr. and Mrs. Leigh L. Gerdine 


Mrs Jane K. Pelton 


The MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN 


Mr. Samual Goldstein 


Miss Jane E Piper 


Mrs. Richard I. Brumbaugh 


BULLETIN is published seven times a 


Mr. Stanley J. Goodman 


Mr. and Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 


Mr. and Mrs G. A. Buder, Jr. 


year, in February, April, May, June, 


Mrs. Mildred Goodwin 


Mrs Herman T. Pott 


Mr. Kurt A. Bussmann 


August, October, and December by the 


Mr. and Mrs. W. Ashley Gray, Jr. 


Mrs. Miquette M. Potter 


Mrs. David R. Calhoun, Jr. 


Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 


Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Hadley Griffin 


Mr. and Mrs. A Timon Primm III 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Champ 


299. St. Louis, Mo. 63166. Second 


Miss Anna Hahn 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Richardson 


Mr. Maris Cirulis 


Class postage paid at St Louis, Mo. 


Dr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Hall 


Mrs. Howard E. Ridgway 


Mrs Francis Collins Cook 


$12.00 per year. $15 foreign. 


Mr and Mrs. Norman W. Halls 


Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Robinson, Jr. 


Mrs. Robert Corley 


The Missouri Botanical Garden 


Mrs. Ellis H. Hamel 


Mr. Stanley T. Rolfson 


Mrs. Dwight W. Coultas 


Bulletin is sent to every Member of the 


The Hanley Partnership 


Mr and Mrs. G. S. Rosborough, Jr. 


Mrs Elsie Ford Curby 


Garden as one of the benefits of their 


Mrs Marvin Harris 


Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 


Mr. and Mrs. John L. Davidson, Jr 


membership. For a contribution as 


Mr and Mrs. Whitney R. Harris 


Mr and Mrs Joseph F Ruwitch 


Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. Day 


little as $30 per year, Members also 


Mrs. John H. Hayward 


Mr. Louis Sachs 


Mr Bernard F. Desloge 


are entitled to: free admission to the 


Mr and Mrs. Harvard K. Hecker 


Mr and Mrs Louis E. Sauer 


Mrs Joseph Desloge. Sr. 


Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 


Mr. William Guy Heckman 


Mrs. William H. Schield 


Echo Valley Foundation 


Grove House; invitations to special 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Hermann 


Mr and Mrs Daniel L. Schlafly 


Mr Hollis L. Garren 


events and receptions; announce- 


Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 


Mr Thomas F. Schlafly 


Mrs. Christopher C. Gibson 


ments of all lectures and classes; dis- 


Mr and Mrs. Wells A. Hobler 


Mrs. Frank H. Schwaiger 


Ms. Jo S. Hanson 


counts in the Garden shops and for 


Mrs. John Kenneth Hyatt 


Mrs. Mason Scudder 


Mr George K Hasegawa 


course fees; and the opportunity to 


Mr and Mrs Stanley F. Jackes 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard Shaikewitz 


Mr and Mrs William J. Hedley 


travel, domestic and abroad, with 


Mr. and Mrs B F. Jackson 


Mrs. A Wessel Shapleigh 


Dr. and Mrs August Homeyer 


other Members. For information, 


Mrs Margaret Mathews Jenks 


Mr. and Mrs. Warren M. Shapleigh 


Mr and Mrs Morris M. Horwitz 


please call 577-5100 



Gardening in St. Louis 

Winter— A Time for Reading & Planning 

Gardening Books 

There are many good books on gardening so it is some- 
times difficult to choose which are the best. Some of my 
favorites include: 

Home Wisdom Gardening by Dick & Jan Raymond, 303 
pgs., $9.95. Profiles of the most popular vegetables highlight 
this interesting, well-written book. It also contains information 
on cooking and canning, and recipes for each group of plants. 
A 300-page book bargain! 

Trees of Northern America by Thomas E. Elias, 948 pgs., 
$19.95. This authoritative guide discusses and illustrates 
nearly 800 North American trees. It is useful to you as a field 
guide if you are on a horticultural holiday in California or for 
your day-to-day use in St. Louis. A must reference for tree 
lovers. 

The Shrub Identification Book and The Tree Identification 
Book by George W. D. Symonds, 895 pgs., $9.95. Using both 
of these books, it is possible (and fun) to identify all of your 
trees and shrubs solely by looking at photographs of leaves, 
flowers, thorns, fruits, buds, and bark. This is one of the most 
easy-to-use and jargon-free books of identification that I've 
ever had the pleasure of reading. 

Tropica-Color Encyclopedia of Exotic Plants & Trees by 
Alfred B. Graf, 1120 pgs., $115. This book is an extravaganza 
of color and information about tropical plants. All 7000 photo- 
graphs are in color! If you want to purchase only one book to 
identify all your house plants, this is it. 

Greenhouse Gro-How by John H. Pierce, 241 pgs., $19.95. 
Excellent drawings, charts, and photographs are in this book 
which is carefully and logically arranged. For beginning or 
experienced greenhouse growers, there is no better book. 

Pruning by Christopher Bricked, 96 pgs., $7.95. The art of 
pruning can be very confusing. This book clears up many 
questions because of its concise text and detailed, accurate 
drawings. You can't go wrong if you use this book as a guide 
to pruning your roses, fruits, and shrubs. 

Edible Landscaping by Rosalind Creasy, 379 pgs., $14.95. 
Growing your own fruits and vegetables or landscaping your 
home wjth ornamental plants are certainly not novel ideas, 
but landscaping your home using edible plants as ornamen- 
tals is. Ms. Creasy presents various overall plans for using 
edibles and gives growing tips for a large number of familiar, 
as well as unusual, plants. 

(These books, and many others, are available in the 
Garden Gate Shop Book Department.) 

What's New: New Vegetable Varieties 

Every year at this time all gardeners are flooded with new 
catalogs proclaiming "newer, better, and bigger" vegetables 
and flower varieties. The trends of new vegetable varieties are 
definitely clear— more disease-resistant and compact plants. 

Almost all vegetables have been miniaturized. One rel- 
atively new attempt is the cantaloupe. Two new varieties of 
"bush" cantaloupe are Honeybush from Burpee and Muske- 
teer which is distributed by several seed companies. 

So many new tomato varieties are introduced each year 
that it is difficult to keep up! Some of the good old standbys 
like Better Boy and Supersonic are hard to beat, but I did try 
two new ones last year. Both Burpee's Super Beafsteak and 
Park's Whopper grew well in my garden. 




OUR PRICES INCLUDE POSTAGE t. 

Packets, Ounces, Quarter Pounds am 
Pounds of Vegetable and Flower Seed- 
eirept where noted. If the purchaser di" 
aires to pay his own express or freipi'n 
rharfres, he may deduct 10 cent* per 
from the prepaid rates here offered. ^ 
so requested and the amount is mentioned 
at the bottom of the order, we will a<f'l 
eitra seods for such amounts, if not deducted. 




MARKET GARDENERS and Truckers who buy seeds 
and sell the products, are Invited to send for our 
WHOLESALE CATALOGUE. 

In writing for it, please state that you "grow for profit," as 
the catalogue is sent only to those entitled to "wholesale 
prices" and who buy seed in large quantity. 
Our Seeds, largely used by Hardeners around St. Louis and In the 
lar*e trucking districts of the South, meet the competition o'^"**" 
from all sources— and meet them successfully. 
THAT GROW and produce a profitable crop. 



We supply SEEDS 



The Super Beafsteak yielded huge (almost grotesque) 
fruit. This improved form of the beafsteak tomato is much 
more disease resistant than the older types. This variety did 
show quite a bit of leaf curl, but this appears to be harmless. 

Park's Whopper was a good producer which grew vigor- 
ously and yielded large, nicely-shaped fruits. It is similar in 
growth habit to Better Boy. I would recommend your trying 
both of these varieties next year in your garden. Let me know 
how they perform. 

Scab-Free Apples 

Have you always wanted to try growing your own apples, 
but were discouraged by complex spray schedules? These 
new apple varieties might be for you. Purdue, Rutgers, and 
the University of Illinois have worked to develop several 
cultivars (cultivated varieties) of apples which are immune to 
apple scab. This is probably the most common damaging dis- 
ease of apples. You may still have to spray periodically for 
certain diseases and insects, but the frequency of spraying 
will be much reduced. 

Three varieties introduced so far are: 
Priscilla—a sweet, red apple of dessert quality which ripens a 
week before Jonathan. 

Sir Prize— a yellow, late ripening apple which resembles 
Golden Delicious. 

Prima— a red, early, fall-ripening apple which ripens 2V2 
weeks ahead of Jonathan. It also resembles Jonathan in 
appearance and flavor. 

— Steven A. Frowine, Public Horticulture Specialist 

3 



Bits and Pieces 

(continued from page 1) 

correspondence from his contemporary 
botanists, his botanical notebooks, and 
his meterological observations. There 
are also the papers of two dozen other 
botanists including their correspon- 
dence and field notebooks. 

These field notebooks are valuable 
as historical records of where these 
scientists collected their specimens. By 
consulting these notebooks, historians 
can map their explorations. One recent 
acquisition— and an extremely impor- 
tant one — were the field notebooks of 
Julian Steyermark for his collections in 
Guatemala. These list each plant col- 
lected, giving a brief description of the 
plant and the area in which it was 
found. (Steyermark received the Gar- 
den's Henry Shaw Medal in 1979 for his 
contributions to botany.) 

In addition to these important doc- 
uments, the archives also holds some 
unusual items. There is a section of a 
pin oak limb. The tree was planted in 
1846 and cut, when it died at 102 in 
1948; it was the last remaining tree from 
the ten-acre area Shaw first laid out as 
his Garden. 

Shaw's microscope is in the ar- 
chives, as well as a camera owned by 
the Garden at the end of the last cen- 
tury. There are keys to buildings that no 
longer exist and plans for buildings that 
were never built. There is also the 
shovel that was used to turn up the first 
spadeful of dirt for the construction of 
the Japanese Garden, and a copy of 
the menu and seating plan for the 
eighth annual trustees banquet, held 
in 1897. 

vOlTI menT (continued from page 1) 

Climatron and other buildings as well 
as for our continued development of 
our programs for children and adults. 
Without adequate support, it will be 
difficult or even impossible for these 
institutions to continue to provide the 
people of St. Louis the quality of service 
they expect and need. We ask you to 
support these important measures 
when you vote on April 5 and look for- 
ward to working with you so that the 
community will continue to benefit from 
all of its fine cultural institutions. 



(j1au> }J-Cs< 



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The opening of the Ridgway Center was 
included in a St. Louis Globe-Democrat 
list of the most signficiant events in 

St. Louis during 1982 

4 



Type Specimens: A Valuable Resource 



From New Scientist, April 22, 1982, 
come these two paragraphs of interest: 
"Among the most vital sources for 
botany and zoology, however, are what 
biologists call "types," the actual spec- 
imens that were in front of the taxon- 
omist when he first named a new 
species and drew up its description. 
Such specimens supply the ultimate 
proof that a particular species, bearing 
a particular scientific name, is actually 
what workers assume it to be. A de- 
scription is never wholly complete. 
Thus, a subsequent worker may find 
minute hairs on the leaves of his spec- 
imens, but these are not mentioned in 
the original description nor in later 
ones. Were they merely overlooked, or 
is he dealing with a different species? 
Obviously the name that he uses for his 
material could be grossly misleading, 
for biological studies are of no real 
value unless there is a complete 
certainty of identity, a unique one-to- 
one relationship between name and 
object. Only with this certainty can the 
various streams of information in the lit- 
erature be brought together to make a 
larger synthesis of knowledge. 

"In this way, zoologists and bot- 
anists are much concerned with the 
physical basis for the scientific names 
they use. The basis may be a spec- 
imen, a type, but in some cases it may 
be a drawing or painting made by the 
original describer or made for him. In 
the absence of a type, such pictues can 
offer more clues than a dry description, 
especially if the latter was written in 
Latin and penned as much as 300 years 
ago, thus long before certain features 
now recognized as important in classi- 
fication were considered significant." 

In the herbarium of the Missouri Bo- 
tanical Garden are three million plant 
specimens, making it the third largest of 
1400 herbaria in the United States. The 
staff had estimated that of these, 50, 000 



were type specimens. However, a re- 
cently begun project to locate and cat- 
alogue these botanically valuable spec- 
imens indicates that this estimate may 
be considerably low. An examination of 
the Garden's 35,000 specimens of the 
Umbelliferae (carrot) family found that 
227 of these were type specimens. The 
original number was 81, meaning that 
there were 146 or 180% more type spec- 
imens than previously considered. If the 
cataloging project shows similar results 
for all families, there could be as many 
as 140,000 type specimens in the her- 
barium. 

When the project is complete, the 
catalog will be valuable for botanists 
visiting the Garden to examine these 
specimens 

The recent years have been a time of 
increasingly rapid growth of the Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden herbarium. 
Started when George Engelmann pur- 
chased the herbarium of Professor 
Johann Bernhardi in 1857— that collec- 
tion contained more than 60,000 spec- 
imens—the herbarium today holds 
nearly 3 million mounted dried plant 
specimens. Dr. Marshall Crosby, Direc- 
tor of Research, anticipates that herbar- 
ium sheet 3 million will be added within 
the next several months. 

Specimen number 1 million was 
added to the collection in 1931, or 74 
years after the herbarium was begun. It 
required another 18 years (until 1949) 
for the next half-million specimens to be 
added, and another 21 years (until 
1970) for the collection to reach 2 mil- 
lion. However, only eight years passed 
until specimen 2 million, 500 thousand 
was added and this most recent half- 
million specimens will have been added 
in only 5 years. 

The current rate at which spec- 
imens are added means that the Gar- 
den's botany program is perhaps the 
world's most active 




Mrs. Christopher S. Bond, wife of Missouri's 
governor, formally opened the first annual Fall 
Festival at the Garden on October 8. Displayed 
behind her is a needlework rug, loaned to the 
Garden by the Governor for display during the 
three-day festival, showing the state flowers of 
each of the fifty United States. Missouri's flower, 
the hawthorn, was used as the border. The Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden Library provided the illus- 
trations on which each flower in the rug were 
based. These illustrations were part of the Gar- 
den 's extensive collection of botanical art. 



Henry Shaw Banquet 

S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, and Leonard 
Hall, nationally renowned nature writer, were honored at the annual Henry 
Shaw Associates Dinner in November. Dr. Ripley received the Henry Shaw 
Medal not only for his leadership of the Smithsonian, but for his influence in 
museum work in general in the world. Mr. Hall received the Albert P. and 
Blanche Y. Greensfelder Medal for his four plus decades of writing about 
nature. (See Bulletin, Vol. 70, Number 6.) 

Upon receipt of his award, Dr. Ripley delivered the featured address for 
the evening. Excerpts appear below. 





S. Dillon Ripley, center, received by Henry Shaw Associates after delivering 
his featured address. 

"I feel like an enormously lucky person tonight to be here 
in this lovely new building, which reminds me in a fascinating 
way of the Crystal Palace and all the marvelous creation of 
glass houses of the 19th Century. It is a pleasure to see 
another building which is of such style, of such elegance and 
to be able to be here rather soon after it opened and to think 
of how much St. Louis contributes to the cultural life of our 
nation." 

"Something wrong has been going on for the last 25 or 30 
years, and Peter Raven, [Garden Director] and I are aware of 
it. There has been a general neglect of the basic research and 
science of the environment ... but we believe that the future 



At the Henry Shaw Associates Dinner, left to right, C. C. Johnson Spink, Pres- 
ident of Board of Trustees; Peter H. Raven, Director; and Leonard Hall, 
Greensfelder Award recipient. 

is in the understanding of the environment, to which we are 
linked inseparably. 

'We cannot ever be anything but what the earth tells us 
to be." 

"We have been living in an age of lack of certitude and 
certainty ... but let us clear the mist out of our eyes, let us 
take the sand out of our eyes, let us look at the sun in January 
. . . and let us remember in that moment, that supernal mo- 
ment, the sun will be a little bit brighter every morning . . . 
birds are beginning to sing then because just as with our- 
selves, their enzymes, their endocrines, are beginning to tell 
them it is a new year . . . and it's going to be a better year. 

"If we can think this sort of way and stop just listening and 
looking at the things that appear on television and in the press 
every morning, I know it's going to be a better year. If you ally 
yourselves to the soil, to the land, to what has made us great 
we cannot fail. So support this marvelous botanical garden 
which Henry Shaw helped to start, and support all the things 
for which we must think in our lives we are all about. [To have 
the chance to tell you] this is why I'm glad to be here tonight." 

— S. Dillon Ripley 



Garden Addition Named for John Lehmann 




An addition to the north side of the 
popular Anne L. Lehmann Rose Gar- 
den will be named in honor of Mrs. Leh- 
mann's late husband, John S. Leh- 
mann. Located on the first terrace near 
the Shapleigh Fountain, the addition 
will be installed in late spring and will 
feature about 150 plants, primarily old- 
fashioned and ancestral roses (those 
that are ancestors to modern hybrids) 
and species, according to Alan Godlew- 
ski, Chairman of Horticulture at the 
Garden. 

John S. Lehmann, whose life over- 
lapped that of Garden founder Henry 
Shaw by three years (Mr. Lehmann was 
born in 1886; Mr. Shaw died in 1889), 
with his wife, Anne L. Lehmann, was a 
major force behind the Garden's sur- 
vival and growth in the 1940s and 
1950s, and was one of those respon- 



sible for the creation of the foundation 
for the tremendous growth of the Gar- 
den's facilities and services in the last 
two decades. 

An attorney and Chairman of the 
Board of Petrolite Corporation (from 
1953 until 1966), Mr. Lehmann was 
elected to the Garden's Board of 
Trustees in 1940. In 1953 he was elect- 
ed as President of the Board and 
served in that position until December, 
1957. Upon the retirement of George T. 
Moore, the Garden's Director from 1922 
until 1953, Mr. Lehmann served as Act- 
ing Director of the Garden until mid- 
1954 when Dr. Edgar Anderson was ap- 
pointed Director. 

The John S. Lehmann Building, 
center of the Garden's active botanical 
research program, is named for him. 
He died in 1967. 



For Younger Members 



Winter Twigs 

"This one has a smile on it!" ex- 
claimed the small child, holding a bare 
twig she had found lying on the ground. 
The child had just discovered a leaf 
scar, that special spot where the leaf 
clung tightly until it drifted to the ground 
in autumn. And, indeed, the scar did 
look like a smiling mouth. 

Leaf scars are only one of the many 
strange marks, lumps, and bumps that 
give bare twigs their characteristic ap- 
pearance. The winter months offer the 
best time to look closely at bare twigs. 
See how many "smiles" you and your 
children can discover by sharing this 
activity. 

You will need: Several bare twigs, 
found on the ground or carefully cut 
from a tree or shrub; magnifying glass; 
knife. 

What to do: Gently feel the length of 
each twig. Does it feel bumpy? Look 
carefully at the bumps. Do they all look 
the same? Some bumps will be buds, 
closed tightly until spring. Other bumps 
will appear as swellings completely en- 
circling the twig; these are called 
nodes. The space between two nodes 
represents the amount of twig growth 
which occurred during one year. Count 
with your child the number of nodes on 
the twig. Is the twig older or younger 
than your child? At each node, look for 
evidence of leaf scars. Do they look like 
smiles (or frowns)? Use the magnifying 
glass to locate tiny dots within the leaf 
scars. These dots are remnants of the 
tubes which carried water and nutrients 
(sap) into the leaves. 

See if the twig has a large bud at the 
upper end; this is the terminal bud. 
What kind of covering does it have 
(hard, soft, fuzzy)? Using a knife, care- 
fully open the terminal bud to see what 
is inside. Does it contain tiny, folded 
leaves? Flowers? 

Place some freshly cut winter twigs 
into a vase of water and put them in a 
sunny window. Change the water fre- 
quently during a period of weeks. 
Watch for changes or swelling in the 
buds. Try twigs from forsythia, pussy 
willow, spirea, or redbud, cherry, or 
plum trees. By forcing winter twigs to 
blossom, you can have an early spring 
indoors! 

—Ilene F oilman, Education Consultant 



Bird Feeding 

Mary Wiese, one of the Garden's 
guides, is an avid bird student. In a re- 
cent discussion about proper food for 
birds in winter, Mary offered the follow- 
ing suggestions: 

Cardinals, nuthatches, etc., love the 
seeds of squash and melons. Just 
throw the seeds on the ground or put 
them into a flat feeder. 

The mixed seed sold in grocery 
stores contains many seeds (milo, 
wheat) which only English sparrows 
and starlings eat. It is much better to 
buy straight millet and straight sun- 
flower seeds from feed stores, such as 
Beckmann, O.K. Hatchery (Kirkwood) 
or others. There is also no need to roll 
feeding balls or pine cones in this small 
seed since the birds which eat it (jun- 
coes, doves, cardinals, white-throated 
sparrows, etc.) cannot cling to the feed- 
ing balls. 

Rather than using expensive peanut 
butter (which may choke a bird unless it 
is crunchy style or mixed with corn 
meal), try collecting beef fat from soup, 
hamburger cooking, or other cooking 
processes. Solidify the beef fat in the 
refrigerator, and then scrape it onto 
pine cones or against tree trunks. 




How To Estimate the 
Height of a Tree 

Take a yardstick and pace off a dis- 
tance of 50 feet from the base of the 
tree. Turn, and face the tree. Grasp the 
yardstick between the fingers at a point 
about 2 inches from the zero end. Hold 
the stick straight up and down (parallel 
to the tree) exactly 25 inches from your 
eye. With the end of the yardstick even 
with the base of the tree, and without 
moving your head or the stick, measure 
the height of the tree in inches. Multiply 
the number of inches by 1.5 to get the 
tree's actual height in feet. 

Example: measured height, 24" x 
1.5 = 36 ft., actual height. 

—Robert Herman, 
Education Department 




Aloe 



It's not a very pretty plant, but most 
everyone we know has one in his kitch- 
en. It's the Aloe, also called medicine 
plant. If you know about Aloe, you also 
know that if you suffer a minor burn in 
your kitchen, you can break off the tip 
of one of its spikes and apply the clear 
ointment that oozes from the broken tip 
to your burn. Almost instant relief. 

Long recognized as a home remedy 
for the relief of minor burns, cuts, and 
rashes, this desert plant has recently 
become the subject of tremendous 
commercial activity. This year's south 
Texas crop (where most Aloe is grown 
commercially in this country) will pass 
$20 million in value. Three years ago, 
the crop was only $3.3 million, accord- 
ing to an October 5, 1982, article in the 
Wall Street Journal. 

Major cosmetic companies are now, 
or are preparing to, manufacture from 
Aloe: soaps, moisturizing lotions, face 
creams. 

A drink, purported to control ulcers, 
is also made from Aloe. 

In all, the Journal reported, there 
were 36 new products on the market in 
1982 made from Aloe, as compared 
with an even dozen for the year before. 
The Food and Drug Administration has 
said that many of the medicinal prop- 
erties attributed to Aloe by product pro- 
moters (some say it makes a good 
toothpaste for smokers, that it will cure 
acne, arthritis, and canker sores) are 
exaggerated. 

But analysis at the University of Chi- 
cago showed that Aloe's gel contains 
an aspirin-like compound and mag- 
nesium which worked together as a 
pain-reliever. It also contains triglycer- 
ides, which promote new skin growth. 

Exaggerated or not, the claims are a 
boon to Aloe farmers, who sell leaves 
(which can weigh up to two pounds) to 
processors for eleven to fifteen cents a 
pound. 

Large Aloe plants can be seen near 
the entrance to the Desert House at the 
Missouri Botanical Garden. Aloes for 
your own kitchen can also be pur- 
chased at the Garden Gate Shop's 
plant department. 



Letter from Bolivia 



We've managed to conduct quite a bit of fieldwork the past 
few months, especially in the lowlands. The northern part of 
Bolivia is beautiful Amazonian forest which has hardly been 
touched by botanists. Every collecting trip continues to bring 
in new records for the country. The collections from my first 
trip last September contained at least 29 genera and one 
family new for Bolivia. This material is still only partially 
identified, so I don't have a precise count of the new records 
from these collections. 

Earlier this year two botanists, Mike Balick and Doug Daly, 
arrived from the New York Botanical Garden to make her- 
barium and seed collections of cusi {Orbignya spp., Palmae), 
which has good potential as a source of edible oils and other 
seed products. This collecting trip was sponsored, in part, by 
an AID project to develop a germplasm center in Brazil for se- 
lecting strains with superior yields of oil. Besides oil, which is 
already extracted from wild stands of palms in Brazil and 
Bolivia, the meal residue from oil extractions is high in pro- 
teins and can be used as animal food, while the endocarp 
makes a high quality charcoal. The taxonomy of Orbignya is 
poorly known, so another objective of this trip was to obtain 
herbarium material of sufficient quality and quantity to shed 
some light on species delimitations. I traveled with them for 
two weeks in the area of Trinidad and Riberalta. In addition to 
the palm collections, we made general collections from those 
areas amounting to several hundred numbers. 

For the past couple of months I have been planning and 
organizing a small book on the cultivated plants of La Paz. 
While this project is still in the development stage, I have 
already begun to assemble a special herbarium collection of 
cultivated plants for the Museo de Historia Natural. At a min- 
imum the book will contain common names, scientific names, 
short descriptions, and keys to the species and major culti- 
vated varieties. I expect it will cover about 300 species, but 
that is a very rough estimate at the moment. Discussions with 
a number of people have produced a consensus that a small 
book would be of great interest to many people in La Paz, 
since nearly every house has a garden of some sort, and no 
publication of this type exists. 

—James C. Solomon, William L. Brown Fellow 

Little Known Wealth: The Choco 

Ironically, the area which scientists think may be, botan- 
ically, the richest place on earth is also the most poorly 
known. Called the Choco, it is located on the western edge of 
Colombia and northern Ecuador along the Pacific Ocean. Its 
area is approximately 100,000 square kilometers (about 
62,000 square miles); by comparison, Missouri is roughly 
70^000 square miles. Perhaps the wettest part of the world, 
the Choco, in parts, has an average annual rainfall of just over 
470 inches; the average for St. Louis is about 35 inches a 
year, though for 1982 the total was closer to 55 inches. 

Partly because of this extreme amount of precipitation, 
which produces a climate unfavorable for exploration, and 
partly because the Choco is not easily accessible, until re- 
cently little work has been done in studying the botany of the 
area. Currently the Missouri Botanical Garden is the only sci- 
entific institution outside of Colombia interested in extensive 
work in the Choco. 

For the last eleven years, Dr. Alwyn H. Gentry, a botanist 
on the Garden's staff, has been making annual explorations of 
the region. Each of his visits yields a substantial number of 



new plant discoveries, many of which have the potential of 
being extremely important economically or medicinally. 

In a recent talk at the Missouri Botanical Garden he de- 
scribed some of these plants. 

One of them, Jacaranda hesperia, is the closest known rel- 
ative of J. caucana. Laboratory tests on the bark of J. cau- 
cana, performed at the University of Illinois, Chicago, showed 
that it yields a substance that "has exhibited anti-tumor and 
cytotoxic activity"— meaning it could be useful in the treat- 
ment of cancer. Because J. hesperia is so closely related to J. 
caucana, it too could have potential for the treatment of 
cancer. 

Another plant, Persea theobromifolia, a tree of the same 
genus as the avocado, at one time was the most important 
timber wood for part of western Ecuador but it was unknown 
to scientists until it was described by Gentry five years ago. 
Only a handful of trees remain alive today, preserved in a field 
station. (The rest of the wet virgin forest in which the species 
once thrived was totally destroyed in the 1960s when the first 
road was constructed into the area.) 

Gentry said that P. theobromifolia was an unusual species 
of the avocado genus. 

Currently the avocado industry is having trouble with a 
root rot affecting commercial trees. The previously known 
sub-genus of Persea which is not susceptible to the disease is 
distantly related to the sub-genus from which the avocado 
crop is produced and therefore cannot be grafted with the 
commercial avocado. 

P. theobromifolia, Gentry said, may be more closely re- 
lated to the commercial avocado and can possibly be used in 
grafting to produce trees not susceptible to the root rot. This is 
currently being tested at the University of California— River- 
side. 

Another plant Gentry discussed was a species of Fevillea, 
a vine of the squash family. This vine produces seeds which 
are approximately IV2" in diameter. When these seeds are 
dried and burned, they produce a blue flame; this blue flame, 
Gentry said, was a clue that they are high in oil. Fevillea is 
now being analyzed at Washington University and its oil could 
prove to be extremely important economically. 

Gentry also described several plants that are (or in the 
case of one, were) common as foods in the Choco region but 
which are all but unheard of in North America. 

One plant, a species of Herrannia of the Sterculia family, 
was once used by the Indians to produce a better tasting 
chocolate than that which comes from cacao. The plant is 
almost extinct today and occurs in the same forest remnant 
as Persea theobromifolia. 

Another is borojo, a plant in the Rubiceae (the same family 
to which coffee belongs), used to make the favorite fruit drink 
in the Choco; it is totally unknown in our own country. 

Dr. Gentry is also engaged in research in Peru, supported 
by a U.S.A.I.D. grant, attempting to locate potential economic 
and medicinal plants there. 



The January issue of National Geographic (circulation 13 
million, world-wide) featured, as its lead article, a story about 
the tropics and their destruction. The Garden's work as a 
leader in the exploration of these areas and as an opponent to 
the massive deforestation currently occurring there was high- 
lighted. The article contains an interview with Dr. Alwyn 
Gentry of the Garden's staff. 

7 



Business, School Leaders Join Garden Board 



John K. Wallace, Jr., Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer of Imperial 
Products Corp., and Penelope Alcott, 
President of the St. Louis Board of Ed- 
ucation, have become members of the 
Board of Trustees of the Missouri Bo- 
tanical Garden. Wallace was elected to 
the Board at its December meeting; Al- 
cott is an ex officio trustee, by virtue of 
her position on the school board, under 
terms of the will of Garden founder 
Henry Shaw. 

In addition to his responsibilities at 
Imperial Products, the nation's third 
largest manufacturer of charcoal bri- 
quets, Wallace is vice president of 
Dance St. Louis and chairman of the 
Pacesetters Division of the Arts and 
Education Council. He has also served 
as chairman of the Jerry Lewis Labor 
Day Telethon for Muscular Dystrophy 
and is a past treasurer of the Young 
Presidents Organization. 

Alcott, who was elected to the city's 
school board in April of 1979, has 
served as Assistant Chairman and 
Chairman of the board's Governmental 
Affairs Committee. She was Vice Pres- 
ident of the Board during the year prior 




"Mr. Wallace brings to the board his sig- 
nificant insights on the cultural climate in 
St. Louis and a great deal of enthusiasm 
for the Garden, " said Board Pres. C. C. 
Johnson Spink of John K. Wallace, Jr. 



"The Garden serves the city on a much 
broader base than most people realize. 
It should be used by the families of our 
students as well as by students them- 
selves because it offers tremendous 
learning experiences. ' ' 

—Penelope Alcott 



to her election as President. She is one 
of six ex-officio trustees on the 
Garden's board. The others are the 
Mayor of St. Louis, the presidents of 



St. Louis University and Washington 
University, the Episcopal Bishop of Mis- 
souri, and the President of the St. Louis 
Academy of Science. 



Nature Preserve Named for Engelmann 

The Missouri Department of Conservation has named a 
140-acre tract of land in honor of George Engelmann, father of 
the Missouri Botanical Garden's scientific program. The prop- 
erty, located in northern Franklin County, near St. Albans, Mis- 
souri, was purchased by the conservation department from 
the Garden in mid-summer, 1982. The department was inter- 
ested in acquiring the property because it contains the best 
stand of riverine forest in eastern Missouri; they will preserve 
it as a natural area. 

George Engelmann, a physician-botanist born in Frank- 
furt-am-Main, Germany, in 1809, immigrated to the United 
States in 1832, settling in the predominantly German com- 
munity of Belleville, Illinois, across the river from St. Louis. 

In his first three years in America, he made long, explor- 
atory trips in his new country, investigating plant life, soil 
conditions, and water supplies. His last such trip was to the 
desert southwest, where he studied the cactus family. Al- 
though he spent the last of his money for that journey, even- 
he reported— selling his gun and horse to finance it, it paid 
him well. 

He became recognized as the world's authority on Cac- 
taceae. 

In a recently published book, Cacti of the United States 
and Canada, author Lyman Benson said, "The great age of 
discovery in the United States was the time of George Engel- 
mann . . . whose research on the cactus family is by far the 
best." Benson includes Engelmann as one of four scientists 
who developed North American botany, with Asa Gray, 
Thomas Nuttall, and John Torrey. 

"Engelmann's work was the product of a keen, enquiring 
8 



well-trained mind and a sound, balanced judgement. As with 
Nuttall, Torrey, and Gray, he published remarkably sound 
work on the basis of only meager print material. [He] was a 
genius who could piece together scattered fragments of infor- 
mation into an amazingly well-organized whole. His insight 
has not been matched in later studies of Cactaceae." 

In addition to his botanical studies, Engelmann was inter- 
ested in meteorology and has been characterized as the 
pioneer meteorologist of the Mississippi Valley. His observa- 
tions (made between 1836 and 1882) were published by the 
U.S. Weather Bureau. 

Perhaps his most visible and important contribution for 
scientific posterity was his founding of the botanical research 
program at the Missouri Botanical Garden. 

When Henry Shaw returned from his final European visit 
in the 1850s with an idea of opening a botanical garden in 
St. Louis, his plan came to Engelmann's attention. Engel- 
mann suggested to Shaw that his garden should "include a 
program of research in addition to horticultural displays." 
With the assistance of Sir William Hooker, Director of the 
Royal Botanic Gardens (Kew), Engelmann convinced Shaw to' 
create an herbarium and research facility. Shaw commis- 
sioned Engelmann to acquire specimens for the herbarium 
and books for a library. 

After Engelmann's death in 1884, a professorship was en- 
dowed at Washington University in his honor. The first Engel- 
mann Professor of Botany was William Trelease, who served 
as Garden Director from 1889 until 1912. Peter H. Raven, 
Garden Director since 1971, is the current Engelmann Pro- 
fessor of Botany. 



CALENDAR 



A Lot Happens at the Missouri Botanical Garden 



Even if the weather is not the best outside, there is still a 
lot going on at Missouri Botanical Garden. During the next 
two months there are flower shows (of course), concerts, 
movies (would you believe a Marx Brothers' Festival?), two 



plays, and a poetry reading by one of America's most re- 
nowned women writers. Clip this page and post it to remind 
yourself of all we have to offer you. We hope to see you here 
often in February and March. 



February Tropical Getaway Month 

What is mid-winter like in St. Louis? Don't answer; we all know too well. 
But if it starts to get to you, get away from it in our Tropical Getaway Month. 
Standing beside a rushing waterfall in a tropical forest (the Climatron) who 
cares if it's five below outside? 



March 



Spring Gardening Month 



FEBRUARY 1-5 

Continuing: 



FEBRUARY 6-12 

February 11-13: 

February 12-13: 

February 12: 
February 12: 



Continuing: 
FEBRUARY 13-19 

February 18-20: 



Continuing: 



Orchid Exhibit (through February 27), Floral Display 
Hall, 9:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. The entire world (well okay, 
maybe not. There are those two three-year-olds, in 
Stony Rapids, Saskatchewan) knows about our orchid 
collection and thinks it's tremendous. Come see it 
yourself this month. 



Groucho, Harpo, Chico, A Marx Brothers' Festival to 
warm your funny bone. Two films for $2.00 (Mem- 
bers), $2.50 (Public). Ridgway Center, 7:30 p.m. on 
Friday and Saturday: 2:00 p.m. Sunday. 
Valentine's Day— All Weekend. Warmth of a different 
sort. Visit the Garden on the weekend before this 
special day; what nicer time can you spend with your 
sweetheart than in the city's most beautiful garden? 
Special brunch for the occasion on Sunday, 2/13. Call 
577-5125 for information. 

Children's Film: Walt Disney's Snowball Express. 
Ridgway Center, 12:00-1 :30 p.m. Of course, there are 
cartoons, too. $1.00 (Members), $1.50 (Public). 
Thread and Thimble Quilt Club Exhibit (through 
February 20), Ridgway Center, 9:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 
We could say these are 25 examples of keeping warm 
turned into an artistic experience. 
Orchid Exhibit 



Theatre Project Co. presents Seahorse— a romance 

called, by the New York Times, "a tender, wistful 

play." Ridgway Center at 8:00 p.m. on all three days. 

Call the Theatre at 531-1301. 

Orchid Exhibit 

Thread and Thimble Quilt Club Exhibit 



Phew! Another winter gotten through. Celebrate with us the coming of 
spring. Look especially at the classes we have to offer and check again your 
copy of our course brochure. Don't have/didn't receive one? Call 577-5140. 



MARCH 1-5 

March 5: 



MARCH 6-12 

March 7: 

March 12: 

Continuing: 
MARCH 13-19 
Continuing: 
MARCH 20-31 

March 27: 

Continuing: 

COMING IN 
APRIL: 



Also: 



Spring Flower Show. Ah, Spring! Enjoy a walk 
through some early spring flowers (through April 3), 
Floral Display Hall, 9:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 



St. Louis Symphony Chamber Chorus. Ridgway 
Center, 7:00 p.m. If some poet didn't say that music 
put spring in the heart, one should. 
Children's Film: Walt Disney's Bambi, Ridgway Cen- 
ter, Noon. The classic. 
Spring Flower Show 

Spring Flower Show 

River Styx P.M. Adrienne Rich, National Book Award 
winning poet, reads from her work. Ridgway Center, 
8:00 p.m. 
Spring Flower Show 

Theatre Project Co. returns with another play: Work- 
ing, based on Studs Turkel's best seller. Call the 
theatre for information. 

African Violet Show, a Spring Plant Sale, Carnivorous 
Plants, and, of course, more classes 



FEBRUARY 20-28 

February 25-27: 
Continuing: 



Theatre Project Co., Seahorse 

Orchid Exhibit (last day February 27) 

Thread and Thimble Quilt Club Exhibit (last day 

February 20) 



Classes 



Classes? Of course we have classes this Spring. Listed below are the 
titles of each class offered during March. The date indicated is the date of 
first meeting, the time, and also the number of sessions, if there are more 
than one. Need more information? Call the Education Department at 577-5140. 
(Saturday Morning Activities are for children with their parents.) (All classes 
meet in the Ridgway Center unless they are noted as being held at the 
Arboretum.) 



March 3 
March 4 
March 5 

March 9 

March 10 



Planning Your Vegetable Garden 7-9 p.m. 

Studies in Tropical Flowers 10 a.m. -3 p.m. 

Saturday Morning Activity: Explore the Food Chain 

10-11:30 p.m. 

Self-Reliance: The Edible Landscape 7-9:30 p.m. 

(3 meetings) 

Capture Nature in Art 7-9 p.m. (4) 

Starting Seeds Indoors 7-9 p.m. 



March 12 



March 19 



March 21 
March 22 
March 25 
March 26 



March 29 



Saturday Morning Activity: Arts and Flowers 10- 

11:30 a.m. 

Birding Along the Mississippi 8 a.m. -2 p.m. 

Art of Chinese Brush Painting 930-noon (3) 

Saturday Morning Activity: Grocery Store Botany 

10-11:30 a.m. 

Pruning and Planting 9 a.m. -noon 

Lawn Maintenance 7-9 p.m. (4) 

Wildflower Walk (Arboretum) 9:30-1 :30 p.m. 

Night Hike (Arboretum) 8-10:30 p.m. 

Saturday Morning Activity: Decorative Eggs 10- 

11:30 p.m. 

Home Orchid Culture 10-3:30 

Composting Workshop 10 a.m. -noon 

Prairie Restoration (Arboretum) 9 a.m. -3 p.m. 

Wildflower Walk (Arboretum) 9:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. 

9 



Garden Increases Service 




Alan Godlewski 



As part of its continuing efforts to 
provide the finest in horticultural ser- 
vice to the community, and beyond, the 
Missouri Botanical Garden recently an- 
nounced the reorganization of its horti- 
culture departments. 

The departments of Landscape 
Horticulture and Indoor Horticulture 
have been combined into a single de- 
partment of Horticulture. Alan Godlew- 
ski, Chairman of Landscape Horticul- 
ture since July, 1978, has been named 
Chairman of Horticulture. 

Steven A. Frowine, formerly Chair- 
man of Indoor Horticulture, has been 
named Public Horticulture Specialist. 
This is a newly created position; in it 
Frowine will provide information for print 
and broadcast media and for the public 




Steven A Frowine 



on horticulture. This new program of 
public outreach is the first large-scale 
program of its type for the country; 
Frowine is the only senior horticulturist 
among the staffs of the country's 150 
botanical institutions to perform in this 
capacity full-time. 

Garden Director Peter H. Raven 
said, "This reorganization will provide 
the opportunity to spread information 
about horticulture more widely to the 
general public than has been possible 
until now, and to publicize the Garden 
even more effectively. The outstanding 
performance by our horticultural staff, 
which has been improving year by year, 
will likewise be enhanced by the flex- 
ibility made possible by the new com- 
bination." 



Garden Hosts Science Teachers 



Science teachers from 43 area 
junior and senior high schools attended 
the first St. Louis Science Educators 
Symposium sponsored by the Garden's 
Education Department, November 5-7, 
1982. Partially supported by the John L. 
Donnell Fund of the St. Louis Commu- 
nity Foundation and the St. Louis 
Metropolitan Teacher Center, the Sym- 
posium was designed to inform teach- 
ers of recent advances in science and 
technology and to provide them with 
related curricula and materials for use 
in their classrooms. 

Keynote speakers challenged 
teachers to renew their commitment to 
their students— the decision-makers of 
tomorrow — and to their profession. Dr. 
Robert E. Yager, President of the Na- 
tional Science Teachers Association, 
assessed the problems in science ed- 
ucation and charged teachers to look 
beyond the textbook for creative ways 
to make science an integral part of the 
classroom. Dr. Yager believes there is a 
10 



90% scientific and technological illit- 
eracy rate in the United States today. 
"If, as Jeffersonian Democracy sug- 
gests, we are to have an informed elec- 
torate, then this is one of the funda- 
mental problems facing society," Dr. 
Yager stated. 

Dr. David M. Raup, Curator of Ge- 
ology at the Field Museum of Natural 
History, provided teachers with current 
information on his research in the area 
of mass extinction, information which 
has only recently been published and 
which is generally unavailable to teach- 
ers at the present time. Dr. Paul F. 
Brandwein, Co-Publisher and Director 
of Research at Harcourt Brace Jovan- 
ovich, Inc., discussed techniques for 
identifying and encouraging the gifted 
student. Dr. Peter H. Raven, Director of 
the Missouri Botanical Garden, dis- 
cussed the Garden's current program 
in tropical research and the social, eco- 
nomic, political, and biological ram- 
ifications of the destruction of tropical 



New Sister Garden 



If ' 









The Missouri Botanical Garden has 
recently inititated a sister-garden rela- 
tionship with the Royal Botanic Gar- 
dens in Sydney, Australia. The asso- 
ciation will allow the opportunity to both 
institutions for information, research, 
and staff exchange. One program cur- 
rently planned is a New Caledonia Gar- 
den in Sydney which will contain plants 
from that island collected by scientists 
from both Gardens. The Missouri Bo- 
tanical Garden has a botanist, Dr. Gor- 
don McPherson, stationed permanently 
on New Caledonia. 

Dr. Lawrie Johnson, Director of the 
Sydney garden, said, "I am delighted at 
the establishment of this relationship. 
We have long enjoyed friendly relations 
and scientific cooperation with Dr. 
Raven, and share many objectives em- 
bodying high standards and community 
service in scientific, educational, and 
horticultural fields." 

Like the Missouri Botanical Garden, 
the Royal Botanic Gardens in Sydney is 
the oldest botanical garden on its conti- 
nent, and was established in 1788 as a 
government farm by the first British 
governor of Australia. The Royal Bo- 
tanic Gardens was created in 1816. It 
contains 75 acres and is surrounded by 
an 85 acre parkland. 

Shaw's Garden also has a Chinese 
sister-garden, the Nanjing Botanical 
Garden. 

rain-forests. 

The emphasis throughout the Sym- 
posium was on practical rather than 
theoretical approaches to teaching. 
Workshop instructors included master 
teachers from St. Louis as well as else- 
where in the country, and participants 
could select from workshops focusing 
on extinction and wildlife restoration, 
bioethics and environmental values, air 
pollution, microcomputers in the class- 
room, microscopy, and the theory and 
practice of Piaget learning. 

—Judy Studer, 
Chairman, Education Dept. 



Notes from the Garden 



Part of the Garden 's work in education is 
in the training of the scientists of tomor- 
row. For close to a century, the Garden 
has been working with local universities 
in their undergraduate and graduate- 
level botany and biology programs, and 
has close ties currently with Washing- 
ton University, St. Louis University, Uni- 
versity of Missouri-St. Louis, and 
Southern Illinois University-Edwards- 
ville. Part of this work is also in provid- 
ing post-doctoral opportunities for ex- 
ceptional individuals who have recently 
received their degrees. These allow sci- 
entists to gain practical experience by 
working in the herbarium of one of the 
world's leading botanical institutions. . . 




Dr. Cheryl Crowder is currently working 
in the Garden's herbarium as a post- 
doctoral fellow under the National Mu- 
seum Act Curatorial Trainee program. 
She works with the Garden's unmount- 
ed temperate collections and the 
legume (pea family) specimens. She re- 
ceived her Ph.D. degree from Texas 
Tech University in 1982 




Dr. Hendrik van der Werff is also serving 
a post-doctoral fellowship at the Gar- 
den, working on the identification of 
plants of the Lauraceae (laurel) family 
and of ferns. His Ph.D. degree is from 
the State University of Utrecht, The 
Netherlands 




Chen Chia-jiu, a visiting researcher in 
the Missouri Botanical Garden herbar- 
ium, has just received an award for his 
contribution to Volume 7 of the Flora of 
China, according to a public announce- 
ment made by the National Science 
Committee in the November 2 issue of 
the People's Daily, the official news- 
paper of the People's Republic of China 
(PRC). This is part of the first major 
award event in three decades, the last 
one being held in the late 1950s. A total 
of 122 awards went to selected teams of 
scientists for their significant research 
and findings in the various fields of 
natural sciences including geology, 
seismology, nuclear physics, and bot- 
any. The issuing authority, the National 
Science Committee, is a government 



agency and the highest official admin- 
istrative body for all the sciences in 
the PRC. 

The Flora of China is an 80 volume 
publication on all the known plants of 
China. Our library holds all of the thirty- 
some volumes already published. The 
award-winning Volume 7 deals specif- 
ically with the conifers and was com- 
piled by a group of botanists over a 
period of more than ten years, with Dr. 
Chen playing a major role. 

C. J. Chen has been on the staff of 
the Chinese Academy of Science's In- 
stitute of Botany, Beijing, for 21 years, 
during which time he has performed re- 
search on the Urticaceae (nettle) and 
Ulmaceae (elm) families of China. He is 
also one of the few botanists specializ- 
ing in the systems of plant classification 
used in ancient China. C. J. Chen came 
to the Garden in November 1981, on 
Garden Director Peter H. Raven's invi- 
tation to collaborate in a joint revision of 
the Chinese species of Epilobium, a 
genus of plants that Dr. Raven and Dr. 
Peter Hoch, also of our Botany Depart- 
ment, have studied throughout the 
world. Dr. Chen will return to China in 
the early summer of 1983. 

—W.L Maria Chee 
Missouri Botanical Garden Library 




i 

Dr. Mireya Correa 

Among the many scientists who have 
visited the Missouri Botanical Garden's 
herbarium recently are Dr. Mireya Cor- 
rea and Enrique Renteria. Correa, Cu- 
rator of the Herbarium and Professor of 
Botany at the University of Panama and 
one of Central America's leading bot- 
anists, spent several months working at 
the Garden with Dr. William D'Arcy, 
editor of the Garden's recently com- 
pleted Flora of Panama, developing a 
key for the identification of the flowering 




Enrique Renteria 



plants of Panama. She and D'Arcy are 
collaborating on a natural history of 
Panama which will be published later 
this year. Renteria, head of the herbar- 
ium at the Medellin Botanic Garden in 
Colombia and the most active field bot- 
anist in western Colombia, has had an 
active working relationship with the 
Garden for several years. On his most 
recent visit, he was preparing a mono- 
graph of the Mauria genus of the 

cashew family 

11 



Notes from the Garden 




Lilla Tower, Director of the Institute of Museum Services, a federal agency that provides grants for 
operating support to museums in the United States, visited the Garden recently. The Garden has 
received the Institute 's maximum grant for the last several years. With her are Garden Director Peter H. 
Raven (right), who is a member of the Institute's National Museum Services Board, and the Honorable 
John G. Tower, Senator from Texas. The Towers commented that they were impressed with the 
Garden's developments of the last few years, and especially with the Ridgway Center. 




A. Timon Primm III, Emeritus Trustee of 
Missouri Botanical Garden, was hon- 
ored recently with a national conser- 
vation award from the Nature Con- 
servancy, a nonprofit conservation 
organization of 145,000 members na- 
tionally. Announced at the Conser- 
vancy's annual meeting this past fall, 
the award was presented to Mr. Primm 
for his leadership of the organization's 
Missouri Chapter and for his work in 
establishing the Missouri Heritage 
Program. 

Mr. Primm, retired vice president 
and general manager of the Pulitzer 
Publishing Co., was a Garden trustee 
for 16 years and was named Emeritus 
Trustee in 1981. He worked principally 
on environmental issues and was in- 
strumental in the 1970 expansion of 
Shaw Arboretum to its current size of 
2,400 acres 




George Wise(r)with Arboretum visitors, 1981. 
12 



George U. Wise, Superintendent of 
Shaw Arboretum since 1979, has been 
named Director of the Memphis Botanic 
Garden in Tennessee. "We will miss our 
friends in Missouri," Wise said. "I am 
grateful to have worked with a ded- 
icated staff at the Missouri Botanical 
Garden and Shaw Arboretum who have 
developed the intriguing prairie project 
and some interesting educational pro- 
grams." 

The Memphis Botanic Garden is a 
tax-supported institution operated by 
the Memphis Park Commission. It was 
established in 1966 and includes a Jap- 
anese garden and an arboretum. The 
Garden also provides educational pro- 
grams in horticulture 



Many meteorologists are predicting a 
cold winter and there are some people 
in St. Louis smiling. The cross-country 
skiers who visited Shaw Arboretum last 
winter are hoping snow will cover the 1 
mile, 3 mile, and 6 mile trails again this 
year. Last year, many skiers reported 
that they experienced the best skiing 
conditions in the area at the Arboretum. 
Members ski for free. A reduced 
rate of $1 .25 per person is charged to 
groups of 15 or more who call to re- 
quest a discount. Groups of 40 or less 
can also rent the lovely stone and wood 
Adlyne Freund Education Center with 
its huge fireplace and modern kitchen 
for $250.00 a day. Call the Arboretum at 
577-5138 for answers to your questions 
about skiing 




Jo-Ann Klebusch Digman has joined the 
Garden's staff as Coordinator of 
Events. She will plan, develop, and 
coordinate Garden events and pro- 
grams as well as events and meetings 
held at the Garden by other organiza- 
tions. She received a Master's Degree 
in 1979 from the School of Social Ser- 
vice of St. Louis University and prior to 
joining the Garden's staff worked as 
Legislative Caseworker and Intern Co- 
ordinator for the Office of Senator John 
C. Danforth. She has also worked as a 
volunteer in Tower Grove House since 
October, 1980 




Brassolaeliocattleya Clarence Kelley 'Tower 
Grove 'A.M., cultivated by the Missouri Botanical 
Garden, received an Award of Merit from the 
American Orchid Society during a juried-exhibit of 
orchids held at the Garden in late fall 



There is quite a bit of news from the 
Garden Gate Shop this time 

The series of attractive Keith West Wild- 
flowers of North America botanical 
prints will be available to Members at a 
special price during February and 
March. The six posters may be pur- 
chased at $10 for the complete set. This 
is a regular value of $30 for the set. . . . 

During the Orchid Exhibit, the shop will 
feature a large selection of stunning 
orchids for sale, to Members, at a 20% 
discount 

Brown-Jordan Outdoor Furniture is 
available to Members of the Garden at 
a 20% discount until March 28. Furni- 
ture may be ordered through the Gar- 
den Gate Shop and Members should 
allow six to eight weeks for delivery. . . . 



There are still 11 months left of 1983, so 
it is still a good time to purchase the 
7983 Flowers of the Missouri Botanical 
Garden Calendar. Ordinarily $4.95, the 
calendar is available now for $3.50 
each 



This year, once again, Members will 
have the opportunity to order bulbs like 
those displayed in the Spring Flower 
Show. These can be ordered through 
the plant department of the Garden 
Gate Shop, and all orders will be sent to 
growers in Holland, from which the 
bulbs displayed in the show came. This 
opportunity is being extended again 
this year because of the popularity of 
the offer during the 1982 show. Reports 
from Members who purchased bulbs 
last year were that the bulbs were of ex- 
ceptionally fine quality 



For the last ten years the Garden's 
library has been engaged in a project to 
recatalogue the holdings of its library. 
During that period of time, the Sunnen 
Foundation has provided generous 
support for the project. 

The library of Shaw's Garden, one 
of the world's finest collections of works 
of botany, contains nearly 100,000 vol- 
umes, including 80% of all the literature 
on systematic botany ever printed. Al- 



ready a major resource for scientists 
and science historians, the library will 
become even more accessible when 
the recataloguing project is completed. 
James Reed, the Garden's librarian, 
anticipates that, with the exception of a 
few collections of pamphlets on partic- 
ular plant families and on plants of eco- 
nomic importance, the library's entire 
holdings will be recatalogued within the 
next two years 



STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION (Required by 39 U S.C 3685) 

1. Title of Publication: MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN Publication No. 00266507 

2. Date of Filing: November 5. 1982 

3. Frequency of issues: Bi-monthly — 6 issues per year. $5.00 per year 

4. Location of known office of Publication: 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 

5. Location of the Headquarters or General Business Offices of the Publishers: 2345 Tower Grove 
Avenue. St. Louis, Missouri 63110 

6. Names and complete addresses of publisher and editor are: Publisher: Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. 
Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166. Editor: Joseph M. Schuster, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166 

7. Owner: Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, Missouri 63166 

8. Known bondholders, mortagees, and other security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of total 
amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities: None 

9 The purpose, function and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for Federal 
income tax purposes has not changed during preceding 12 months. Authorized to mail at special rates 
(Section 132.122, PSM) 



10 Extent and nature of circulation: 



Average no. copies 

each issue during 

preceding 12 

months 



Actual no copies 

of single issue 

published nearest 

to filing date 



A 


Total no copies printed 
(Net Press Run) 




16.473 


17,350 


B 


Paid Circulation 

1. Sales through dealers and carriers, 










street vendors and counter sales 




none 


none 




2. Mail subscriptions 




14.938 


15,125 


C. 


Total paid circulation 




14,938 


15,125 


D. 


Free distribution by mail, carrier or other 


means 








— samples, complimentary and other free 


copies 


954 


950 


E 


Total distribution 

1. Office use. left-over, unaccounted. 










soiled after printing 




581 


12,275 




2. Returns from news agents 




none 


none 


G 


Total (sum of E. F1 and 2— should equal 










net press run shown in A) 




16.473 


17,350 



I certify that the statement made by me above is correct and complete. 

(Signed) Joseph M Schuster, Editor 
Manager of Publications 



When we think of spring, we think of 
tulips. When we think of tulips, we think 
of Holland. This spring, Members of the 
Missouri Botanical Garden have the op- 
portunity to visit the Garden Country of 
Europe— Holland— during a fifteen day 
tour of Holland and Belgium. 

Departing from St. Louis on April 25 
and returning on May 10, the tour will 
visit the historic Botanic Garden at 
Leiden (one of the world's oldest, 
founded in 1587); Keukenhof, featuring 
the largest display of tulips in the world; 
the Hague; five castles (one of which 
tour members will spend the night in); 
and a medieval market place. 

If you want this spring to be one 
you'll long remember, join the tour to 
Holland and Belgium. Call Foster Travel 
at 421-1787 for information 

w 

What does the Garden's increase of ad- 
mission rates mean to Members? They 
save more money each time they visit 
the Garden: of course Members are still 
admitted free of charge. The new rates, 
for your information, are: Adults, $3.25. 
Children, 6-16, $1. The Family Rate is 
now $7.50 and tour groups of 15 or 
more are admitted for $2.25 for each 
person 



New 
Members 

October-December 1982 



Sponsoring Members 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Monsey 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pennington 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Saligman 

Mrs. William B. Weaver 

Mr. John R Weber 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Westerbeck 

Sustaining Members 

Mr. Gay J. Ackerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert W. Begeman 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn A. Christopher 

Mrs. Rollin L. Curtis 

Mr. Paul F. Fletcher 

Mr and Mrs. John H. Long 

Mr and Mrs. William McBride Love 

Mr. Hugh Scott, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs James M. Scott 

Mr. Kenneth Skaggs 

Mr and Mrs Nicholas M. Weiss 

Contributing Members 

Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Allen 
Mr. and Mrs. David E. Babcock 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh F. Barnett 
Mrs. Lula Mae Boehmer 
Mrs. Mane M Brandt 



(continued on page 14) 



13 



New Members 

(continued from page 13) 

Mrs. Dorothy D. Buehrle 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bush 

Mr. and Mrs. George J. Casalone 

Mr. and Mrs. Basil C. Cole 

Dr. and Mrs Nick Colarelli 

Mr and Mrs. Leon Corlew 

Mary and Ray Cosner 

Mr. and Mrs. David Cumming 

Mr and Mrs. Charles W. Davis 

Miss Mildred Depping 

Mr. Lewis E. Dinsmore 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Dodson 

Mrs. Teresa Emnett 

Mr. John H. Fernng IV 

Mr and Mrs. W. W. Fetner 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob H. Fiala 

Ms. C. Joan Fink 

Dr. and Mrs. Alvin R. Frank 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D Greco 

Mr Chris Guise 

Yusef Hakimian 

Mrs. Raymond Hampston 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Hartwell 

Mr. and Mrs Maurice G. Hill 

Mr. and Mrs Arthur E Hoffman 

Mrs. Edna M Jones 

Frances Kampen 

Mr. and Mrs. Lucky Kelley 

Mr. and Mrs. Loren M. Knowles 

Mrs. Josephine M. Korte 

Mr. and Mrs Richard J. Kozacka 

Mr. and Mrs Norman Langraf 

Mr. and Mrs Wilbur J. Larson 

Rev Thomas N. Lay, S.J. 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles Leven 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Loos 

Mrs. Virginia Lopez 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Marshall 

Mr. C. L. Martin, II 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert McLean, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ted A. Melsheimer 

R. G. Metcalfe, Jr — Metcalfe Travel 

Mr and Mrs James J. Michael 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J Middendorf 

Mr. and Mrs. G W. Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary Mueller 

Mr. and Mrs. Glen Mueller 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Newman 

Miss Edna P. Pipkorn 

Mr. and Mrs L. Poellot 

Mr and Mrs Mel Quarternik 

Mr. and Mrs Norman Rebsamen 

Regency Park Financial Associates 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Schiffman 

Mr. and Mrs. Adolf E. Schroeder 

Ms. Wanda Lee Sicking 

Mr. and Mrs Leo Steck 

Mr. and Mrs John C. Sullivan 

Mr and Mrs. John Surgant 

Mr. John R. Sutter 

Mr. and Mrs. Wylie Todd 

Mrs. Gl'oria T. Trieman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Vanderhnden 

Dr. and Mrs. Pio M. Vilar 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. White 

Mr. George Wirth 

Mr. and Mrs Roland J. Young 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Zentay 



Increased 
Support 

Sponsoring Members 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin R. Breihan 

Mr. Richard D. Dunlap 

Dr. Robert L. Guaas 

Dr. and Mrs. Ronald K. McGregor 

Dr. and Mrs. G. G. Robben 

Sustaining Members 

Mrs. Ralph Appel 

Mr. Tom Bade 

Mr and Mrs. Robert H Chapman 

Mr. and Mrs William J. Chapman 

Mr. and Mrs. John O. Dozier 

Miss Barbara Elftman 

Mr. A. R. Elsperman 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Goodman 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Hoffman 

Mr and Mrs E O. Klein 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred S. Kummer 

Miss Edna Landzettel 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold G. Lieberman 

Mr. Bernard Mangelsdorf 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry C. Mueller 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis H. Niebling 

Mr. James W Robinson 

Mr. and Mrs. William G. Schuler 

Mr and Mrs. Milton G. Scott 

Mr. and Mrs Robert J. Slattery 

Contributing Members 

Mr. H. M. Altepeter 

Ms Linda Beck 

Mr. Richard W Bennet 

Miss Margaret J. Borgman 

Miss K M. Boos 



Ms. Sue Burklund 

Mr and Mrs. J J. Landers Carnal 

Ms. Beverly Cochran 

Mr and Mrs Eugene Corey 

Mr. and Mrs. David G. Dempsey 

Ms. Jean Duvel 

Ms. Rose Evoy 

Mrs. L. A Freund 

Mr. Wm. K. Frymoyer 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Carr Gamble 

Mrs. Minnie H Gardner 

Mr. and Mrs. John G Goessling 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Gosebrink 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles R. Gulick 

Mr. and Mrs. James H Howe III 

Mr Edwin W. Joern 

Ms Kathryn M Klemp 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey J. Kopff 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Kunz 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Laux 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Lawrence 

Mr. and Mrs. L W Ledbetter, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert S Lerman 

Mr. C. L. Martin, II 

Mr. and Mrs. G. W Miller 

Mr. Elwood J. Moore 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard I. C. Muckerman 

Mrs. E. M. Nadel 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Noll 

Mrs. Susan Popovich 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul O. Schnare 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene C Sunnen 

Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Taibleson 

Dr. and Mrs. Francis O. Trotter, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne R. Wagner 

Mr. and Mrs Robert L. Wenzlaff 

Mr. and Mrs Richard Zarembka 



Tributes 

January-February 1983 
IN HONOR OF: 

Mr. and Mrs. David Baer 

Dr and Mrs John Fries 

Mrs. Howard Baer 

Mrs. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. Clarence C. Barksdale 

The Femmes Follies Syndicate 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Beal 

Mrs. Morris Glaser 

Mr. Charles H. Blumenthal 

Mr and Mrs Stanley C. Blumenthal 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bonacker 

Marilyn and Arthur Boettcher, Jr 

Mr. Marvin Burstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 

Mr. William H. T. Bush 

David A. Ivry 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Cochran 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman W Halls 

Dr. Thomas Croat 

Women's Organization of the 
National Association of 
Retail Druggists, Chapter 8 

Mr. Saul Dubinsky 

Sam and Selma Soule 

Mrs. Eva Fleischer 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Adelson 

Anabel Gilroy 

Dorothy Becker 

Mrs. Helen Gittelman 

Mr and Mrs H M Talcoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Harris 

Mr. and Mrs Symour Balis 

Miss Sara Prahl Hebrank 

Mrs. Prince A. Gardner 

Mr. and Mrs. William Hines 

Mrs. Ben H. Senturia 

Dr. and Mrs. Harry R. Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Key 

Mr. and Mrs. Otway W. Rash III 

Mrs. Robert E. Kresko 

Mr. and Mrs Walter G. Stern 



Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Levi 

Mrs. Ben H. Senturia 

Mr. and Mrs. Tobias Lewin 

Sunny and Myron Glassberg 
Nancy Lieberman 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M Talcoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Sheridan K. Loy 

John and Mary Loy 

Patty Martin and S. E. Freund 

Michael H. Freund 

Mrs. Natalie E. Freund 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mass 

Mrs Peggy Hellman 

Mr. and Mrs Peter Husch 

Phyllis Minden 

Macy and Betty Abrams 

Dr. and Mrs. Daniel O Sullivan 

Dr. and Mrs. John Wm. Fries 

Kathryn Amelia Raven 

Dr. and Mrs Marshall Crosby 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Daley 

Dr. and Mrs. Alwyn Gentry 

Mrs Florence Guth 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvard Hecker 

Mr. Charles Orner 

Mr. and Mrs. James Reed 

Dr. and Mrs. Leslie Rich 

Mrs. Carol Linger 

Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Walter Roehrs 

Miss Irma Haeseler 

Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Samuels 

Mrs. J. A. Jacobs 

Mr. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Dr. Virginia Brown 

Mrs. Margaret Dagen 

Mrs. Frances Franklin 

Mr. Oliver Wagner 

Mr. and Mrs. James Singer 

Dr. and Mrs. Max Deutch 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel England, Jr. 

Peggy Hellman 

Mrs. Zena Hellman 

Mrs. J. A. Jacobs 

Helen and Fred Levis 

Mr. and Mrs Tobias Lewin 

Clara N. Lowenstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis R. Putzel 



Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence K. Roos 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Ruprecht 

Mr and Mrs James Rutherford 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Dr. and Mrs. Llewellyn Sale, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Singer. Jr 

Mrs. Albert Stix 

Jenny N. Strauss 

Richard K. Weil 

Mr. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mr. and Mrs. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr. 

Miss Jamie Stern 

Mr and Mrs Henry O. Johnston 

Mrs. Ben H Senturia 

Mrs. George D. Stout 

Mrs. William S Bedal 

Mrs. Milton H. Tucker 

Mr. and Mrs Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mrs. Mahlon B. Wallace 

Dr. and Mrs Harold Cutler 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Witte 

Reynold W Maimer 

IN MEMORY OF 
Mrs. Scott K. Alvis 

Mr Duane M. Smith 
Theodore Asimakopoulos 

George V Hogan Family 

Mrs. Jerry (Vina) Bair 

Mrs. Edwina Medlock 

Charles C. (Buck) Barker 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Harvey Jobe 

Mr. Edward G. Bischoff 

Mr. and Mrs C Robert Pommer 

Lois G. Bixby 

Stella B Houghton 

Ted J. Bottom 

Elmer Boehm Family 

Laurence R. Brown 

Phyllis Lenz 

Vernelle Linch 

Alma Rapue 

Frieda Ross 

Meredith Woodman 

Mr. Louie Bryan 

Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Bainter 



Dr. Grayson Carroll 

Mr and Mrs Robert L Blanke, Jr 

Mr. Redman Carroll 

Mr. and Mrs. Donell J Gaertner 

Mr. Harley Castle 

Mrs. Marion Parker 

Mrs. Theron Catlin 

Elizabeth and Alexander Bakewell 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr. Edward G. Cherbonnier 

Mr and Mrs. Roy Brandenburger 

Ann and Amy Stewart 

Mrs. William Clabaugh 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Goessling 

Mrs. Wayman (Mary) Crow 

Mr and Mrs. B. Everett Gray 

Mr. Tom P Kletzker 

Mrs. Joseph E. von Kaenel 

Mrs. Elleard C. Entzeroth 

Smith Entzeroth, Inc. 

Frank C. Faquin, Sr. 

Mrs Gloria Hogbin Luitjens 

Mr. Echeal Feinstein 

Mr. and Mrs. John E Brown 

Roy V. Flesh 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Alexander Jones 

Mrs. Gloria Hogbin Luit|ens 

Ed and Mary Flohra 

Gerald Flohra 

Mr. Roy Monroe Fox 

Mr. and Mrs. Don McClain & Family 

Mr. Ralph Friedman 

Mrs Jane Lending 

Mr. Richard Fuder 

Mr and Mrs. Dale W Ehlers 

Mr. John Gausch 

Loretta Cliffe 

General Donation 

H. Ann Daws 

Mrs. Tillie O. Gerchen 

Mr. and Mrs. I. B. Rosen 

Mrs. Grace Gilbert 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin J. Cornwell, Sr. 

Marvin Goldstein 

Elizabeth and Alexander Bakewell 

(continued on next page) 



14 



(continued from page 14) 

Alice Goodman 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lowenhaupt 

Dr. Samuel B. Grant 

Mrs. Mason Scudder 

Mr. and Mrs. William LeRoy Ward 

Mrs. Adele Grass 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Mathias 

Jack Greenlee 

Anita and Bob Siegmund 

Mary Howard Hall 

Mrs. Ada Mary Max 

Mrs. Hiram Norcross 

Mrs. David Wells 

Debby Hansen 

Mrs. Robert H Kittner 

Mrs. Erwin (Gayle) Harms 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Bascom 

Mrs. Clark R. Gamble 

Mrs. John C. Tobin. Jr. 

Mr. Albert Hart 

Mr. Fred Rock 

Miss Elizabeth Hays 

Mrs. Dwight W Coultas 

Mrs. Chauncey P. Heath 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Scharff 

Christine Stapler Hedges 

Alice H. Annin 

Mr. Arthur Heimenz, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Parker Smith 

Mr. Walter F. Heinecke 

Mrs. Walter F. Heinecke 

Colonel James Higgs 

Polly Brown 

Leonard Hornbein 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lowenhaupt 

Mrs. Paula Hotze 

The Women's Association 

Pilgrim Congregational Church 
Mrs. Mary Julia Ing 
Mrs. Evelyn Muether 
Mrs. Susie Johnson 
The Dale W. Ehlers Family 
Mr. Arthur Charles Jones 
Mr and Mrs. C. Robert Pommer 
Mr. Edward D. Jones 
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome C. Allen 
Mrs. Ethel C. Jost 
Mrs. E. X. Boeschenstein 
Mrs. June Karandjeff 
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Henderson 
George E. Kassabaum 
Nancy and David Metcalfe 
Virginia M. Kilper 
Friends at Washington University 
Edward Korn 
Dr. and Mrs. Michael Glines 
Alice Hungerford Kramer 
Mr. and Mrs. Stifel W. Jens 
Mr. and Mrs. B. K Werner 
Mrs. Henrietta Kramer 
Dr and Mrs. Clarence M. Benage 
Donald Krieger 
Myrtle G. Weinrobe 
Rembert W. La Beaume 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 
Albert Kurrus 
Mrs. R. E. Smyser, Jr 
Mrs. John H. Landwehr 
Mrs. Marie Essock 
Mr. Elmer W. Lueckerath 
James Lane 
Mrs. Morris Suchart 
Edith Lord 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Husch 
Mrs. Florence Lynott 
Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Ackenhausen 
Rhoda and Ken Robin 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Watel 
Mr. Paul A. Lyons 
Emily and Helen Novak 
Mr. Clifford P. McKinney 
Mrs. John G. Burton 



Mrs. P. A. Gardner, Jr. 

Mrs. Florence Major 

Herman and Addie Lueking 

Mrs. William A. Mann 

Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Lange 

Mrs. Olpha Mattes 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Baker. Jr. 

Mrs. Bertha Meyers 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Kocot 

Mrs. Katherine McLeod Moore 

Mr. James L. Sloss. Jr. 

Mrs. Jean Mueller 

Mrs. Louise Dremhofer 

Mrs. Ruth G. Nevins 

Dr. and Mrs. Glenn A. Gentry 

Mr Ron Holton 

Ms. Nancy Lawrence 

Ethel H. Schweppe 

Dr. and Mrs. Venkat Veensetty 

Dr. Alston W. Noyes 

Mrs. Elaine W. Ernst 

Mrs. Harlan B. Owens 

Richard R. Wobbe 

Minerva Paster's Mother 

Mrs. Marion G. Parker 

Mr. Frank Pelton 

Mr. and Mrs. Parker Smith 

Mrs. Vera Ransin 

Wallace W Allman 

Walter G. Repohl 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley C. Blumenthal 

Mrs. R. J. Rice 

Sam and Helen Hodgdon 

Mrs. Sarah Rich 

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Brayman 

Miss Gladys Richardson 

Ms. Elizabeth Behle 

Ms. Donna Wallace 

Mrs. Clemence Riefling 

Mrs. Wm. W. Crowdus 

Mrs. Ruth Riester 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Hawksbee 

Mrs. Donald E. Riffle 

Dr. and Mrs. James C. Sisk 

Mr. W. Crosby Roper, Jr. 

Mrs. Victoria C. Simmons 

Rose House 

The Robert C. Purk Family 

John Roth 

Mrs. Carl Bauman 

Mark Adam Roth 

Richard V. and Elaine Anderson 

Mrs. Bronson S. Barrows 

Mrs. Joan L Bebee 

Begeman Family 

Tracey Leigh Beisman 

Vernon and Meryl Berry 

Tom Blanchfield 

Frank Block Associates 

Mrs. John M. Bowlin 

Mr. and Mrs. G A. Buder, Jr. 

Mr. Richard W. Burgess 

Mary. Katie. Donna, and Jim Busch 

William Cam 

Jane H. Campbell and Family 

Robert W. and Peg Carvell 

John W. Chnstensen 

Mr. and Mrs. Hartley B Comfort 

Laura and Charles Cook 

Cooper for Congress Staff 

Donald S. and Barbara Correll 

Craig Family 

Miss Nancy Craig 

Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Custis 

Mrs. Harlow P. Davock 

Mr. Richard R Deskin 

J. S. and Teresa F. De Tar 

Mr. and Mrs Ralph D'Oench 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Doering 

Phil Edwards 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Foley 

Foreign Credit Insurance Association 

Robert J. Forgrave 

Mr and Mrs. Wm. H. Forgrave 

J Gordon and Nancy S. Forsyth 



N. J. Gassensmith 

David A Gee 

Dr. William M. and Cynthia L Gee 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter J Goodson 

Ted and Sally Groetsch 

J. Henges Enterprises, Inc. 

Mrs. Charles Hickman 

Mr Jeffrey A. Hoch 

Mildred and Charles Johnson 

Jim and Anita Jones 

Ardis R. Jorndt 

Ronald and Bonnie Kershner 

Nancy and Everett Kling 

Althea and Joe Kortenhof 

Eric Kraeutler 

Dorothy and Bill Leara 

Mrs. Charles J. Lynn 

Mr. and Mrs A. W MacLean 

Mr. William R Mahne 

The Malone Family 

Ed, Mary Kay, and Trina McDuffie 

Gladys M. Millar 

Missouri Savings and Loan Association 

James J. Nance 

Janet Peppel 

Margaret B. Perry 

Andrew Kinnear Powell 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Verne Powell 

George Matthew Powell 

Helen Mary Powell 

Mrs Robert M. Rasmussen 

W. E Reed and Nancy Reed 

Laura Reid 

H. Kenneth Reynolds, Jr. 

Miss Alice W Roth 

Roth Insurance Agency. Inc. Staff 

Louise Carter Roth 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry K Sandhagen 

Mrs. Marie K. Scheibal 

Walter L. and Betty Jane Schirr. Jr. 

David and Susan Schuler 

Bruce L. Shaw 

Dr. and Mrs. John J. Sheridan 

Mr. and Mrs. Brent Sherman 

James L Sloss, Jr. 

Mrs. E. T. Smith 

Roland E. Smith 

Kathryn C. and Richard I. Stearns 

Robert P. Stupp 

Gwyneth and Charles Swardson 

Mrs. Harold R. Swardson 

Mrs. Thomas O Tarrant 

The Teutenberg Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Thielker 

The Truesdell Family 

Gladys A. Turk 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard D Turk 

J. W. Linger and Katherine Linger 

John W. Unger 

Clyde H. and Manlynn Vadner 

Mrs. Melchia A. Wagner 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. M. Ward 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam C. Wartinbee 

Mr. Sam C. Wartinbee, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Watrous 

and Family 
Jack and Ellen Weihe 
Mrs. Carl Winsor 
Earl P. Winsor 
Mr. Ted Ruwitch 
Mr. and Mrs. Lester Adelson 
Mrs. Pearl Sandle 
Mrs William Biggs 
Mrs. Louis Christen 
Mrs. F. T. Guelker 
Mrs. Genevieve Hall 
Mrs. Charles Kelly 
Mrs. Joseph Lembeck 
Mrs. Christa Rariden 
Mrs. Louis Rothenheber 
Mrs. John Rothweil 
Mrs. Charles Sherwin 
Mrs. Junius Speas 
Mrs. John Vogel 
Mrs. W. D. Wheeler 
Mrs. Adele Sappington 
Dorothy Becker 
Mrs. Theodore Schmid 
Mrs. Walter F. Raven 



Mrs. Edward Schroeder 

Hawbrook Garden Club 
Mr. J. Barry Schroeter 

Miss Georgia M. Richardson 

Mrs. Gertrude Schunk 

Helen L. Bruce. M.D. 

Mrs Cordelia Finnegan 

Mrs. Helen Hilliker 

Katherine Louise Scull 

Beta Alpha Phi Sorority 

Kurt A Buchheim 

Mary Jane Cox 

Helen Dowell 

Mr. and Mrs Ron Goetzke 

Mr and Mrs Lloyd B. Hanahan 

Mickey A. Heimos 

N, G Heimos Greenhouses 

Mr. and Mrs. Norwm G Heimos 

Richard and Linda Kelley 

Harold Patton Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Myron Zaborowski 

Marvin B. Seltzer 

Ella Tappmeyer 

Thomas W. Shields 

Marion and George Herbst 

Virginia Spiegelhalter 

Virginia E. Meyer 

Mrs. Rose Spitzmiller 

Miss Kathryn Harpstrite 

Richard P. Stahl II 

Mr. and Mrs Thomas A Rogers 

Mr. and Mrs Milton J Schulze 

Hazel Lee Adcock Strain 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward L O'Neill 

Dr. E. Stranquist 

Mrs lone Pilkington 

Mrs. Eli Strassner 

Mrs. Robert Burnett 

Carl and Qumtus Drennan, Jr 

Clark and Joyce Dnemeyer 

Mr and Mrs. D. Goodrich Gamble 

Jack and Barry Kayes 

St. Louis Herb Society 

Sylvia Schweich 

Mrs. Herman Seldm 

Dr and Mrs. D. B. Strominger 

Mr. Erwin Strehlmann 

Dot Everding 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Guise 

Louis Stuetzer 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Kocot 

Mrs. Marie Taylor Spink Sweeney 

Mrs. Jean-Jacques Carnal 

Mrs E. R. Culver, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Franchot 

Elizabeth S. Foster 

S. E. Freund 

Mrs J A. Jacobs 

Frank and Ruth James 

Mrs Helen Lewis 

Mr and Mrs Roger E. Lord, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mrs. Florence Jones Terry 

Mr. and Mrs. Ingram Boyd, Jr. 

Nancy Owen Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Pensel 

Mr. Fred Toguchi 

Dr. and Mrs. Peter K. Matsuoka 

Mr. R. Claud Trieman 

Mrs. Dwight W. Coultas 

Mrs. Gertrude Von Spach 

Mrs. Robert H. Kittner 

Whitney C. Wilson 

Mrs. Frances Brawner 

Helen Wolff 

Lee and Harvey Shapiro 

Mrs. Mattie Wood 

Mrs. Dwight W. Coultas 

Miss Marjone L. Feuz 

Ann Zeltmann 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Belzer 

Mrs. Mary Ellis 

Mrs. Carolyn Garoian 

Mrs. Clara A. Wieland 



15 




C A Garden Party With Bobby Short 



A Garden Party with Bobby Short, a gala benefit for the 
Ridgway Center of the Missouri Botanical Garden, will be held 
on Saturday, April 23. This is the first gala benefit staged at 
the Garden since the Chrysanthemum Ball of September 
1976. 

Bobby Short, the featured entertainer for the Garden 
Party, has been called America's best-loved cabaret per- 
former. He has been acclaimed for his concerts and his work 
both on and off-Broadway and is best-recognized as the 
singer-pianist in the Charley perfume commercials on tele- 
vision. His album, Bobby Short Loves Cole Porter, received a 
Record of the Year Award from Stereo Review Magazine in 
1972 and was one of the best-selling records of that year. 

The black-tie evening will be divided into two parts. Dinner 
(reservations are limited to 250 persons) will be held begin- 
ning at 6:30 p.m. in the Ridgway Center. The cost of $150 per 
person includes cocktails and a private performance by 
Bobby Short, as well as the after-dinner festivities. (Persons 
interested in being Patrons may contribute $250; Benefac- 
tors, $500.) 

Beginning at nine o'clock, cocktails will be served and 
there will be a cabaret program by Bobby Short, dance music 
by Encore Orchestra, and (still later) an omelet breakfast pre- 
pared by the omelet king, Rudy Standish. 

For those not attending the formal dinner earlier in the 
evening, the cost of the after-dinner festivities is $75 per 
person; 32 and under, $50 per person. 

Chairpersons for this fabulous event are Mrs. Robert Her- 
mann, Sr., Mrs. Walter Stern, and Mrs. Warren Shapleigh. 

A coupon for reservations is found below. Because seat- 
ing for dinner is limited, you should make your reservations as 
soon as possible. 



PLEASE MAKE. 

MR. MRS. MS MISS 

ADDRESS 

CITY 



RESERVATIONS FOR: 



STATE 



ZIP. 



TELEPHONE 



WE WILL BE ATTENDING: 
6:30 

Cocktails, Dinner and Private Show $150 per person. Price 
includes cabaret dance and breakfast. 

I would like to be a Patron— $250 per person 

I would like to be a Benefactor— $500 per person 



9:00 

Cabaret Dance and Breakfast $75 per person. 

32 years and under— $50 per person. 

I have enclosed my check for $ 

Charge my reservations for $ 

to my MasterCard # 

VISA #_ 

Expiration date 



Contributions are tax deductible for income tax purposes 
in the manner and to the extent provided by law. 

Make Checks payable to: A GARDEN PARTY 
P.O. BOX 14216F 
BLACK TIE ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 63150 



Do you have some free time this winter? Why not volunteer at 
the Missouri Botanical Garden? Call 577-5187 for informa- 
tion 



MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN -0026-6507) 

P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST. LOUIS, MO. 



m 




Volume LXXI, Number 2 

April 1983 

Includes Calendar for April/May 1983 



Missouri 

Botanical 

Garden 

Bulletin 



The Garden Looks to the Future 



The Garden has the capacity to 
profoundly increase the resources 
for science education in St. Louis 
and nationally if we have 
sufficient support. 



This spring, voters will be asked to approve 
a measure that will provide tax support for the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, the world's only 
major botanical garden that does not receive 
direct tax support for its operations. 

"With the completion of the Ridgway Cen- 
ter, the cornerstone of the master plan, the 
single most important task confronting us 
today is to put the Garden on a financial foot- 
ing that will insure our prosperity for gen- 
erations to come. The only way to do this is to 
obtain a base of local public funding." That is 
how Peter Raven, the Garden's Director, de- 
scribed the importance of the measure, la- 
beled Proposition 4, which will be on the April 
5th ballot in St. Louis City and County. 

Proposition 4 will create a Botanical Gar- 
den Subdistrict in the Zoo Museum District 
and levy a 4 cents per $100 assessed valuation 
property tax to support the Subdistrict. The 
Zoo-Museum District currently funds the 
St. Louis Zoo, the Art Museum, and the 
Museum of Science and Natural History. Prop- 
ositions 1, 2 and 3, which also appear on the 
ballot, provide for property tax increases for 
each of these institutions. 

It is anticipated that the tax will provide 
about $1.2 million to the Garden— after de- 
ducting for some losses in revenue (admission 
prices, for example, will be reduced under the Proposition)— 
or about 20 percent of the Garden's nearly $5 million annual 
budget. 

The funds would be used for much needed repairs and 
improvements and to support the Garden's public programs. 
"We have two challenges to meet that we cannot adequately 
fund now," Raven said. "First, major repairs. We operate on 
an extremely tight budget and do not have the resources to 
maintain our older buildings. Our production greenhouses are 




70 years old, for example. The Desert and Mediterranean 
Houses (built in 1913) are in need of major repair. Even the 
Climatron, which is only 22 years old, is built on the founda- 
tion of the old Palm House which is 70 years old. 

"Our other challenge is to provide more programs for 
school children, for families, and for senior citizens." The 
Garden is a major center for science and horticulture educa- 
tion for children and adults." 

Each year, the Garden serves more than 50,000 people in 

(continued on page 3) 



Comment 




When most people think of the Missouri 
Botanical Garden, they do not think of 
numbers but instead— and rightly so— of 
our horticulture displays, our many educa- 
tion programs, and our scientific research. 

We ourselves usually describe our pro- 
grams in terms of quality, not in quantity. 
Our primary goal is always to provide pro- 
grams and displays of the highest caliber. 
But I would like to — for the minute or so it will take you to 
read this— deal with our programs in quantitative terms. 



During 1982, one-half million people visited the Gardei 
more than 50,000 participated in our educational program: 
Over the past several years, the numbers of visitors and sti 
dents have been increasing more than ten percent annuall; 

Our budget, though, has been going up even faster. I nfl< 
tion the last few years has taken a heavy toll, not only on us bi 
also on our contributors. Utility costs increase unrelenting!; 
and we do require large amounts of energy in order to gro 
and maintain our plants. Our buildings are aging, and we hav 
not been able to provide the preventive maintenance nece; 

(continued on page 



HENRY SHAW 
ASSOCIATES 

Anonymous 

Mr and Mrs Adam Aronson 

Mrs. Newell A Auger 

Mrs Agnes F. Baer 

Mr and Mrs Howard F. Baer 

Mr. and Mrs Alexander M. Bakewell 

Mr. and Mrs Edward L. Bakewell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr. and Mrs Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. and Mrs Carl L A Beckers 

Mr. and Mrs Brooks Bernhardt 

Mr. and Mrs Albert G. Blanke, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs John G. Buettner 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. T. Bush 

Mrs J. Butler Bushyhead 

Mr. and Mrs. Jules D. Campbell 

Mrs Jean-Jacques Carnal 

Miss Adelaide Cherbonnier 

Mrs. Fielding T. Childress 

Mr. and Mrs. Fielding L Childress 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary A Close 

Mr. Sidney S. Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin J. Cornwell. Sr. 

Dr. and Mrs William H. Danforth 

Mr and Mrs. Sam'l C. Davis 

Mr. Alan E. Doede 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Dohack 

Mr. and Mrs. H. R Duhme, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs J. Robert Edwards 

Mr. and Mrs David C Farrell 

Mrs Mary Plant Faust 

Mrs. Clark P. Fiske 

Mr. and Mrs Gregory D Flotron 

Mr. and Mrs Robert B Forbes 

Mrs. Eugene A Freund 

Mrs Henry L Freund 

Mr S E. Freund 

Mrs. Clark R Gamble 

Dr and Mrs Leigh L Gerdme 

Mr Samual Goldstein 

Mr Stanley J Goodman 

Mrs Mildred Goodwin 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Ashley Gray, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs W. L Hadley Griffin 

Miss Anna Hahn 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Hall 

Mr and Mrs. Norman W. Halls 

Mrs. Ellis H. Hamel 

The Hanley Partnership 

Mrs. Marvin Harris 

Mr. and Mrs. Whitney R. Harris 

Mrs. John H. Hayward 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvard K. Hecker 

Mr. William Guy Heckman 

Mr. and Mrs Robert R Hermann 

Mr. and Mrs Henry Hitchcock 

Mr. and Mrs Wells A. Hobler 

Mrs. John Kenneth Hyatt 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley F Jackes 

Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Jackson 

Mrs. Margaret Mathews Jenks 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Eugene Johanson 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry O. Johnston 



Mr. and Mrs. Landon Y Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Boardman Jones, Jr. 

Mrs A F. Kaeser 

Dr. and Mrs John H. Kendig 

Mr and Mrs. Samuel M Kennard III 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer G. Kiefer 

Mr. A. P. Klose 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Knowles 

Mr and Mrs Robert E. Kresko 

Mr and Mrs. Hal A. Kroeger, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver M. Langenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Langsdorf, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Lathrop 

Mr. and Mrs John C Lebens 

Mrs. John S Lehmann 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard L Levy 

Mr. and Mrs Stanley L Lopata 

Miss Martha Irene Love 

Mr and Mrs H, Dean Mann 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Maritz, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs William E. Maritz 

Mr. Harry B. Mathews III 

Mr, and Mrs. Morton D. May 

Mrs. James S. McDonnell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sanford N. McDonnell 

Mr. and Mrs. Roswell Messing, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. I. E. Millstone 

Mr and Mrs Hubert C Moog 

Mr and Mrs John W Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Moore 

Mrs. W. Gillespie Moore 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter L. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Eric P. Newman 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr. and Mrs C. W. Oerth 

Mrs. John M. Olin 

Mr. Spencer T. Olm 

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Orthwein, Jr. 

Mrs Elizabeth R Pantaleoni 

Mrs Jane K. Pelton 

Miss Jane E Piper 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 

Mrs Herman T. Pott 

Mrs Miquette M Potter 

Pratt Buick. Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Timon Primm III 

Mr and Mrs Joseph A Richardson 

Mrs Howard E. Ridgway 

Mr and Mrs. F. M Robinson, Jr. 

Mr Stanley T. Rolfson 

Mr. and Mrs G. S. Rosborough, Jr. 

Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. Louis Sachs 

Mr. and Mrs Louis E. Sauer 

Mrs. William H. Schield 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Thomas F. Schlafly 

Mrs. Frank H Schwaiger 

Mrs. Mason Scudder 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Shaikewitz 

Mrs. A Wessel Shapleigh 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mrs Thomas W. Shields 

Mrs. John M. Shoenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H Shoenberg 

Mr and Mrs Sydney M Shoenberg, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. John E. Simon 

Mr and Mrs. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mrs Tom K. Smith, Sr. 

Mr and Mrs. Tom K. Smith, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace H. Smith 

Mrs Sylvia N. Souers 

Mr. and Mrs. C C Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Hermann F. Spoehrer 

Mrs. Robert R Stephens 

Mr and Mrs Walter G Stern 

Mrs Mildred E. Stifel 

Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius F. Stueck 

Mr. and Mrs. Hampden Swift 

Mr. and Mrs Edgar L Taylor, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Tooker 

Mr. and Mrs Joseph W. Towle 

Mr. and Mrs Jack L. Turner 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Walsh, Jr. 

Mrs. Horton Watkins 

Mr and Mrs. Richard K. Weil 

Mrs. S. A. Weintraub 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben H. Wells 

Mr and Mrs. B. K. Werner 

Mr and Mrs. O. Sage Wightman III 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene F. Williams. Jr 

Mrs. John M. Wolff 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald D Wren 

Miss F A Wuellner 

Mrs. Eugene F. Zimmerman 

Mr and Mrs Andrew R Zinsmeyer 

Mr and Mrs. Sander B. Zwick 

DIRECTOR'S 
ASSOCIATES 

Anonymous 

Mr. and Mrs John W Bachmann 

Mrs. Arthur B Baer 

Mr. and Mrs C. Perry Bascom 

Ms Allison R. Brightman 

Mr. and Mrs. H, Pharr Brightman 

Mrs. Richard I. Brumbaugh 

Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Buder, Jr. 

Mr. Kurt A. Bussmann 

Mrs. David R. Calhoun, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C Champ 

Mr. Maris Cirulis 

Consolidated Gram & Barge Co. 

Mrs. Francis Collins Cook 

Mrs. Robert Corley 

Mrs. Dwight W Coultas 

Mrs. Elsie Ford Curby 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Davidson, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. Day 

Mr Bernard F. Desloge 

Mrs. Joseph Desloge, Sr. 

Echo Valley Foundation 

Mr. Hollis L. Garren 

Mrs Christopher C. Gibson 

Ms Jo S Hanson 

Mr. George K. Hasegawa 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Hedley 

Dr. and Mrs August Homeyer 

Mrs John Valle Janes. Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. M Alexander Jones 

Dr. and Mrs David M. Kipnis 

Mr and Mrs. Thorn Lewis 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldrige Lovelace 



Mr. and Mrs. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Ben Miller 

Mr and Mrs Shadrach F Morris, Jr 

Mr and Mrs. Donn Carr Musick, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs William L Nussbaum 

Mrs. Harry E. Papin, Jr. 

Mrs. Jean M. Pennington 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Perry 

Mrs. Drue Wilson Philpott 

Mrs. Ralph F Piper 

Mr Dominic Ribaudo 

Mr and Mrs. Sidney Richman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A Ridgway 

Mrs. Edward J Riley, Jr 

Mrs. John R Ruhoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Ruprecht 

Safeco Insurance Company 

Mr Don R Schneeberger 

Dr. and Mrs John Shoentag 

Mr and Mrs Leon B Strauss 

Miss Lillian L Stupp 

Mr and Mrs Harold E Thayer 

Mr and Mrs. John K Wallace. Jr. 

Watlow Electric Company 

Mr Thomas L. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. Don L. Wolfsberger 

C. C. Johnson Spink 
President, Board of Trustees 

Mrs. Shadrach F. Morris, Jr. 
President of the Executive 
Board of the Members 



Dr. Peter H 
Director 



Raven 



8^3 Member of 

V% The Arts and Education 

Fund of Greater St. Louis 

The MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN 
BULLETIN is published seven times a 
year, in February, April, May, June, 
August, October, and December by the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower 
Grove, St Louis, Mo. 63110 Second 
Class postage paid at St. Louis. Mo 
$12.00 per year. $15 foreign 

Thp Missouri Botanical Garden 

Bulletin is sent to every Member of the 
Garden as one of the benefits of their 
membership For a contribution as 
little as $30 per year. Members also 
are entitled to: free admission to the 
Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitations to special 
events and receptions; announce- 
ments of all lectures and classes; dis- 
counts in the Garden shops and for 
course lees; and the opportunity to 
travel, domestic and abroad, with 
other Members. For information, 
please call 577-5100. 

Postmaster: send address changes to 
P.O. Box 299 St Louis, MO 63166. 



The Garden Looks to the Future 



(continued from page 1) 



its education programs. Students range from 
pre-school and kindergarten age to graduate 
students seeking doctoral degrees to senior 
citizens interested in continuing education. 

"Although we serve so many students 
each year, we would like to be able to reach 
many more than we presently can," Raven 
said. "The next few decades are going to be 
increasingly oriented to science and tech- 
nology. We at the Garden have the capacity to 
profoundly increase the resources for science 
education in St. Louis and nationally if we 



We do not have the resources to 
maintain our older buildings. The 
Garden is the only major botanical 
garden in the world that does not 
receive direct tax support. 



have sufficient support." 

The Garden, founded by Henry Shaw in 
1859, is the oldest botanical garden in the 
United States and is a National Historic 
Landmark. 

When Shaw died in 1859, his will specified 
that the Garden be "forever kept up and main- 
tained for the cultivation and propogation of 
plants and devoted to the same and to the 
science of Botany, Horticulture, and allied 
subjects." 

For the most of its first century the Garden 
operated almost exclusively on the funds pro- 
vided by Henry Shaw's estate. Today, the 
endowment provides only 18 percent of the 
operating budget income. The Garden has 
greatly diversified its sources of revenue 
during the last 30 years. 

"Our current support structure can be un- 
derstood if you think of it as a pyramid. At the 
top is Shaw's endowment. Beneath it are the 
means of support we've added in the almost a 
century since his death. What we require now 
is a solid, financial base for the Garden's 
support," Raven said. 

"We've increased and diversified our ser- 
vice in this last century and are a valuable part 
of the life of St. Louis." 

Among botanical gardens today, the Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden is unsurpassed in the 
U.S. and ranks with the Royal Botanical Gar- 
den at Kew, the British Museum, and the botanical gardens in 
Geneva and Paris as the most important in the world. 

C. C. Johnson Spink, President of the Garden Board, 
summarized it this way: "Henry Shaw had the vision of the 
Garden, and he provided support for the Garden to insure its 




prosperity. His vision has lasted a century and a quarter. 

"Support through the Zoo-Museum District will insure the 
prosperity of the Garden for the next generations. Shaw had a 
great dream, and we want to continue it and insure the Gar- 
den's vitality in the years to come." 

3 



Gardening in St. Louis 

New Plants To Try in Your Garden 

Strawberries from Seed 

A new strawberry hybrid called SweetHeart, which can be 
grown from seed, will be introduced to gardeners this year. It 
is an everbearing type which means it produces fruit from 
summer through fall. The more commonly grown strawberry 
is called a springbearing or Junebearing type (even though 
most of these produce fruit during May in St. Louis). This 
strawberry has much larger and more berries than the ever- 



bearing type. Springbearers are usually purchased as 
dormant plants in March or April. There are many good culti- 
vars which do well in St. Louis. Two varieties which I highly 
recommend are Cardinal, developed at University of Arkan- 
sas, and Guardian. 

Try growing some of these strawberries this year. In addi- 
tion to having delectable fruit, these plants have attractive 
foliage which makes them an ideal ornamental border. 



Miniature Fruit Trees for Containers 

A new horticultural development is the genetic dwarf fruit 
tree. These miniature fruit trees grow to an average of 6 to 8 
feet and can be grown in 24 inch tubs. They bear full-size 
fruit. Varieties which are available now are Sensation Peach, 
Sweet Melody and Honeyglo Nectarine, Golden Glow Apricot, 
and Compact Mac Apple. The peaches, nectarines, and apri- 
cots have beautiful foliage so they are very attractive for patio 
plantings since they provide colorful blossoms in the spring, 



attractive foliage in the summer, and fruits in the fall. Extra 
care should be taken in overwintering these plants in con- 
tainers. Put them in an unheated garage, a lath house, or up 
against the northeastern side of the house where they are not 
exposed to much winter sun or wind. 

Miniature fruit trees are available from Stark Bros. Nur- 
sery, Louisiana, MO. (toll free telephone number— 1-800- 
392-0278). These trees are also sometimes available from 
local nurseries. 



Super-Sweet Corn 

Super Sweet or Extra Sweet Corn has been bred to con- 
tain a special gene, making the kernels sweeter and prevent- 
ing the sugar in them from being converted to starch as 
quickly as in standard sweet corn varieties. Some people feel 
that the kernels of these varieties are not as creamy as the 
standard sweet corn; this was not apparent to my wife and me 
when we tried it last summer. We thought it was the best corn 
we had ever eaten! 

To insure good pollination, I planted the corn in blocks of 
four to six rows, ten to 15 feet long. I planted some single and 
some double rows. Seeds should be planted about four to six 
inches apart and then the seedlings should be thinned to 10 
to 12 inches apart to allow adequate room for each corn plant. 
You need about four ounces of seed per 100 feet of row. This 
length of row will yield about 100-125 ears of corn. 

Since my soil was poor (I was using a vacant city lot), I had 
to fertilize frequently for better growth and yield. I used about 
three to four pounds of 5-10-5 fertilizer per 100 square feet of 
row applied at the side of the row at planting time. I side- 
dressed with a nitrogen fertilizer (Urea) at the rate of about V2 



pound per 100 feet of row when the plants were eight to ten 
inches, and sidedressed again when the silks appeared. 

To harvest fresh sweet corn on a regular basis, you can 
sow blocks of one variety at two-week intervals or sow blocks 
of several varieties with different maturing dates at one time. 
The soil should be 60-65°F when sowing the seeds. If it is 
much colder than this, many of the seeds will rot in the 
ground. In the St. Louis area you can sow sweet corn from 
mid-April to early July. 

It is important not to plant Super Sweet varieties close to 
standard sweet corn varieties since they will cross-pollinate 
and the result will be reduced sweetness. 

The exceptions are those varieties called Everlasting Her- 
itage. They appear in the catalogs with the initials "EH" after 
the variety name. They will not cross-pollinate with other corn 
varieties and may be the best choice if you would like to have 
some of the Super Sweet and standard sweet corn planted 
close together. 

To retain best flavor, boil Super-Sweet corn for four to six 
minutes. 



The chart below shows how I rated each of the Super Sweet Corn varieties I grew: 
Super Sweet Corn Varieties 



Comments 

Yellow, crisp, very sweet, fruity. Excellent flavor — 2-3 ears per stalk. My 
favorite. 

Good, sweet, flavor— tender kernels. 

Yellow, not as sweet and crisp as Butterfruit — more starchy tasting. 

Tender— somewhat starchy like Kandy Korn. 

Small ear, short growth, quick maturity — very sweet, 2nd favorite to Butterfruit. 

Good sweet flavor — vigorous grower — medium-size ear. 

Large ear— vigorous grower— creamy, starchy — better than Kandy Korn. 

— Steven A. Frowine, Public Horticulture Specialist 

SOURCES 

Burpee, W Atlee Burpee Co., 300 Park Avenue. Warminster, PA 18974; Geo. W. Park Seed Co., Inc., Greenwood, S C 29646. 1-800-845-3366; Stokes Seeds, Inc., 737 

Main St., P.O. Box 548, Buffalo. NY. 14240, Twilley Seeds Co., Inc., P.O. Box 65. Trevase, PA 19047 

4 



Variety 


Source 


Butterfruit 


Park's 


lllini Xtra-Sweet 
Kandy Korn (EH) 


Many Sources 
Many Sources 


Miracle 
Sugar Sweet 


Stokes 
Burpee 


Sweet Time 
Tendertreat 


Twilley 
Twilley 



Approx. Days to Mature 

72 

85 
89 

82 

72 

82 

95 



Gardening in St. Louis 



Hosta 

The genus Hosta contains perhaps forty species of peren- 
nial herbaceous plants. The majority of the species are native 
to Japan, with a few species occurring in Korea and China. 
The genus itself was named in commemoration of Nicolaus T 
Host, an eighteenth century Austrian physician, and was first 
introduced into culture in European gardens about 1790. 

Hostas are hardy and thrive under light shade, which cer- 
tainly makes them useful plants for many St. Louis gardens. A 
member of the Liliaceae, the lily family, Hosta was previously 
known as Funkia, which is still often used as a common name. 
A more apt and descriptive common name is plantain lily. 

The leaves of Hosta resemble those of plantain, a com- 
mon weed found in lawns throughout St. Louis, hence its 
common name. But, the similarity stops there, as hostas are a 
useful and ornamental garden plant deserving more attention 
in the St. Louis area. 

Hostas vary in size from miniatures only a few inches tall 
to large plants 30 to 36 inches tall with leaves the size of 
rhubarb. In late summer, they produce long spikes, up to six 
feet tall on some species, of funnel-shaped flowers of lav- 
ender-blue or white. Some species have a pleasant sweet fra- 
grance which is especially apparent at dusk. 

The basic requirements of this diverse and interesting 
group of plants are rich soil highly amended with organic 
matter, regular moisture, and light shade. The prime enemy of 
the Hosta is the garden slug and/or snail which can be con- 
trolled by baiting or spraying with preparations specifically for 
slug control. They also need protection from hot, drying winds 
in the summer which can tatter the thinner leaved varieties. 

Planting is usually done in spring or fall with the crown or 
top of the plant set just below ground level. Spring and fall are 
also the times that one undertakes division, the mode of prop- 
agation available to the homeowner. Most modern nurseries 
use the micro-propagation technique of tissue culture to 
produce greater quantities of some of the highly desirable 
cultivars of Hosta. 

Hosta, valued mostly for its foliage, has leaves that are 
generally lance-shaped or heart-shaped with deeply im- 
pressed veins, giving the plant a very bold, textural appear- 
ance. The color of Hosta foliage is quite variable. It can be 
light chartreuse-green, glaucous blue-grey, dark green, varie- 
gated with white, or variegated in multiple shades of green. 
These traits make the Hosta a valuable addition to the hera- 
ceous plant pallet. 

The following hostas are recommended for the St. Louis 
area: 

Hosta decorata This species has white-margined, blunt- 
based leaves, and tall stalks of purple urn-shaped flowers in 
August. A good cultivar is "Thomas Hogg." 

Hosta fortunei One of the larger, more bold-leaved forms 
with a large number of cultivars, including "Aurea," a beau- 
tiful form whose leaves are entirely yellow, fading gradually to 
green leaves broadly edged with white and grey beneath. 

Hosta lancifolia With lance-shaped leaves of rich green and 
lilac flowers freely born on vigorous plants during the sum- 
mer. There are several cultivars with white margins, one of 
which is "Louisa." 

Hosta plantaginea Has olive-green, heart-shaped, some- 
what heat-resistant leaves with fragrant flowers in August. 



Two hybrid cultivars of note are "Honey Bells" and "Royal 
Standard." 

Hosta sieboldiana This species has large bluish or green 
heart-shaped leaves with lavender flowers in early summer. 
There are also yellow-leaved forms and variegated forms, the 
best known being the hybrid cultivar "Francis Williams." 

Hosta tardiflora This is a very distinctive plant. It is a dimin- 
utive species, with narrow, very shiny dark leaves and purple 
flowers in the autumn. 

Hosta tokudama This species has blue-green leaves puck- 
ered like seersucker fabric and stalks of white flowers. It is a 
rather slow-growing species. 

Hosta ventricosa This is a bold plant with broad heart- 
shaped leaves of rich dark shining green with wavy edges. 
The flowers are bell-shaped of deep violet, making an unmis- 
takable impression in the shady border. 

There is also a society for those who become infected with 
the Hosta bug. The address for those interested is: 

Mrs. Olive Langdon, Secretary 

The American Hosta Society 

5606 11th Avenue 

South Birmingham, Alabama 35222 
For a list of Hosta resources send a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope with your request to: 

Alan Godlewski, Chairman 

Department of Horticulture 

Missouri Botanical Garden 

P.O. Box 299 

St. Louis, Missouri 63166 

—Alan Godlewski, Chairman of Horticulture 



Many of the hosta species and cultivars will be on 
display in the new Hosta Garden, the garden area that has 
been developed between the Scented Garden and the Flora 
Gate along the east wall. The Hosta Garden will be planted 
this spring, and has been given in memory of Marie Schaef- 
fer Shields by her children. A number of other hostas will 
continue to be featured in the English Woodland Garden, 
where they have delighted visitors during recent years. 



Shovel, Hoe, Radio 

Your radio is now one of your most important gardening 
tools. 

Since mid-February, Steven A. Frowine, the Garden's 
Public Horticulture Specialist, has appeared twice monthly on 
KMOX-AM's "At Your Service" series, giving listeners horti- 
cultural information and solutions to gardening problems. 
Each program deals with a specific topic appropriate to the 
season. 

For April and May, the schedule is: 
Thursday, April 7: Spring Lawn Care 2-3 p.m. 
Saturday, April 16: Annual & Perennials 1-2 p.m. 
Wednesday, May 11: Tomato & Other Warm Growing 

Vegetables 3-4 p.m. 
Saturday, May 21: Shade Plants 3-4 p.m. 

KMOX is at 1120 on the A.M. dial. 

5 



Science Notes 



Southern African Mosses 

For the last six and a half years, Dr. Robert E. Magill, 
Assistant Curator of Bryophytes at the Missouri Botanical 
Garden, has been working on a moss flora of Southern Africa. 
Recognized as the world's leading authority on Southern 
African mosses, Dr. Magill has completed two of the planned 
four fascicles for the project which is part of an overall flora of 
the area. Completion of his project, the first major moss flora 
of the African continent in almost half a century, will be ex- 
tremely important to scientists' understanding distribution 
patterns and evolutionary trends for both African and South- 
ern Hemisphere mosses. Of the 600 to 700 species of mosses 
Magill expects to find in southern Africa, an area about the 
size of Texas and New Mexico combined, about a third will be 
species found to occur naturally no where else in the world. 

While a recent catalogue lists more than 15,000 separate 
publications dealing with African bryophytes (the class of non- 
flowering plants including mosses and liverworts, the word 
coming from the Greek bryon moss— and phyton plant), most 
are out-of-date and have no illustrations or keys to aid identi- 
fication. Because none are comprehensive, even routine 
specimen identification requires time-consuming research. 
Magill's flora will provide scientists with a reliable tool for 
identification of all known mosses of southern Africa as well 
as for many found in parts of central and eastern Africa. 

The need for such a comprehensive study on Southern 
Hemisphere mosses is especially important at this time 
because of increasing demands on the land there by lum- 
bering, mining, agriculture, and highway construction. These 
enterprises are quickly displacing the natural areas and there 
is no trend toward reversal. 

Through this project, the Garden (one of the world's lead- 
ers in the study of mosses) will continue its cooperation with 
the Botanical Research Institute of Pretoria. 



The "Useless" Moss 

When we spoke with Dr. Robert E. Magill about his Moss 
Flora of Southern Africa (see above), we asked him why a 
scientist would study mosses: aside from sphagnum (peat 
moss) and aside from helping a Boy Scout locate north in a 
woods, they seem to have no practical use. 

While Dr. Magill agreed that they have little apparent use, 
he said that scientific investigation cannot be restricted only 
to subjects which may fit a utilitarian criterion. First, some- 
thing that seems useless today may be found to be extremely 
valuable later. Second, he said, mosses are "an integral part 
of the flora of an area. You can't study the flora and fauna of 
an eco-system and not study all of it. 

"Mosses are a primary element of many eco-systems. 
They are important for retarding soil erosion. They also form 
seed beds for other plants because they hold a lot of water 
and soil. Mosses participate in the breakdown of rock and 
organic matter, such as leaves and bark, which supply 
nutrients for other plants." 

Magill also listed three reasons scientists are interested in 
studying mosses at this time. 

They are important in the detection of air pollution, he 
said. "Mosses are very sensitive. Their leaves are mostly only 
one cell thick and so have no protection against pollution. 

"They are also used in detecting soil minerals. Because 
they draw minerals from the soil we can determine what is 
present in an area from examining them. 

"Third, mosses are also valuable in the study of dessica- 
tion [drying] and drought resistance in plants. They can sur- 
vive long periods of drought; they dry up very quickly when 
they are deprived of water but they do not die. If scientists can 
isolate what gives them this characteristic and can introduce 
this into other plants, we could protect some crops from 
severe damage because of drought." 



Notes on Cameroon 

The Missouri Botanical Garden recently initiated a research project in 
Cameroon when it sent Dr. Duncan W. Thomas to reside and work in that 
country. The world's most active center for studies in tropical botany, the 
Garden now has full-time staff members residing and researching in Panama, 
Bolivia, New Caledonia, Nicaragua, Colombia, and Peru, in addition to Cam- 
eroon. Dr. Thomas, a Research Associate with the Garden since December, 
1980, received his Ph.D. degree from University College of North Wales in the 
United Kingdom. Following this, he performed field work in tropical Africa, 
including Cameroon. 

Cameroon, located on the western coast of Africa a few 
degrees north of the Equator, is just over 180,000 square 
miles in size. This is a little more than two and one-half times 
the size of Missouri. The geography ranges from a low coastal 
plain with rain forests in the south to forested mountains in 
the west and grasslands in the north. 

We will be concentrating our work in the large forest 
reserves of southwest Cameroon, in particular Korup and 
Ejagham Council reserves. A committee of the U.S. National 
Research Council has identified the Cameroonian forests as 
the most species-rich in Africa. Economic pressures in recent 
decades have caused the loss of natural areas there as in the 
tropics in general. Even on land set aside for forest, the need 
for economic timber often leads to the replacement of diverse 
natural ecosystems with monocultures. As a result of this a 
large number of species will soon become extinct. 

Historically, American botanists have shown little interest 
6 



in the flora of tropical Africa. As the North America Repository 
for African Collections, it is logical for the Missouri Botanical 
Garden to take a lead in this project. 

For several reasons, the rain forest ecosystems of Cam- 
eroon offer unique research opportunities. Tracts of little- 
disturbed forest still exist, including some of the most floris- 
tically diverse in Africa. The government is in the process of 
establishing large national parks in some of these least dis- 
turbed areas, where long term research projects will be 
welcomed. 

These factors suggest that work in the Cameroonian 
forests will make important contributions to the emerging 
picture of African rain forests. Our work will form an important 
basis for future scientific researchers from many disciplines. 

We anticipate extensive collections in two important plant 
families, the Euphorbiaceae (spurge) and the Sterculiaceae, 
which includes the cacao tree, Theobroma cacao. Cacao is 
one of the most important economic plants of Cameroon; 
many species of Euphorbiaceae are important components of 
mature rain forest in Cameroon. 

In our work we will be collaborating with the Herbier 
National Camerounais and also working with the Flora du 
Cameroun project, centered at the Laboratoire de Phaner- 
ogamie, Museum National, Paris. We will be contributing ma- 
terial on the Euphorbiaceae. 

— Dr. Duncan Thomas, Assistant Curator 




Dr. Krukoff (r) receiving 1981 Shaw Medal from 
C.C. Johnson Spink. 

B. A. Krukoff 1898-1983 

B. A. Krukoff, an important benefac- 
tor of systematic botany, died on Jan- 
uary 19, 1983. Born in Kasan, Russia, 
on July 20, 1898, he arrived in the 
U.S.A. in 1923. He graduated from 
Syracuse University in forestry in 1928 
and spent most of his professional 
career with Merck and Co. (now Merck, 
Sharp and Dohne) working with plants 
as sources of various drugs, including 
anesthetics, anti-malarials, anthel- 
mintics, and cortisone. 

Between 1928 and 1955, he led nu- 
merous botanical exploration expedi- 
tions to South America, Africa, and 
Sumatra. The principal aim of these 
explorations was the discovery of po- 
tentially useful plants. Over 100,000 
sheets of herbarium specimens were 
collected, together with about 4,000 
wood samples. 

Aside from his work with Merck, he 
carried out extensive research in syste- 
matic botany, often in collaboration with 
others. His concentration was on the 
American species of Strychnos (the 
genus including Strychnine) of which 
he described 25 new species, the Meni- 
spermaceae (the Moonseed family, 
many members of which, like Strych- 
nos, yield alkaloids) of which he de- 
scribed four genera and 11 species, 
and Erythrina (a genus of the pea 
family) of which he described 28 
species. He was the author or co-author 
of about 70 publications, and organized 
a series of four symposia on Erythrina. 

In 1928 he began a long association 
with the New York Botanical Garden, 
serving as honorary curator from 1940 
to 1948 and again from 1970 until his 
death. In 1970 he received a Distin- 
guished Service Award from New York. 
The Missouri Botanical Garden award- 
ed him the Henry Shaw Medal in 1981. 

The Krukoff Curatorship of African 
Botany at Missouri Botanical Garden 
(held by Dr. Peter Goldblatt) was en- 
dowed by him, and he also supported 
various botanical studies at Kew, Lei- 
den, and Missouri. 

—Marshall R. Crosby, 
Director of Research 



The Garden Library 



Founded in 1859, the Garden's 
library is the oldest botanical library in 
the United States and among the five 
largest such libraries in the world. With 
collections of over 400,000 items, the 
library supports the research activities 
of the Garden's botanists, students, 
and research associates by providing 
the necessary scientific literature and 
related information services. It holds an 
estimated 80 percent of the world's 
printed literature on systematic botany, 
from the 15th century to the present. In 
addition, the library maintains rich col- 
lections in the other plant sciences, in- 
cluding botanical history, plant ecology, 
horticulture, gardening and economic 
and medical botany. 

As well as having these rich collec- 
tions of published scientific literature, 
the library has nearly 200,000 non-book 
materials, including maps, man- 
uscripts, photographs, archival rec- 
ords, and botanical art and illustration. 
These non-book collections serve as 
valuable scientific, historical, and geo- 
graphical resources for researchers in- 
vestigating the plant kingdom. 

The library's collections are avail- 
able through personal visit and by inter- 
library loan. The bulk of the library's 
holdings is only available for use within 
the Lehmann Building, but a small cir- 
culating library of books on gardening 
and horticulture is available for borrow- 
ing by Members of the Garden. 

In 1982, 300 institutions from 47 
states and 22 foreign countries bor- 
rowed materials from the Garden's li- 
brary. 

Among the important special collec- 
tions in the Garden's library are the 
Sturtevant Pre-Linnean Collection 
(about 1,000 volumes on botany and 
natural history published between 1474 
and 1753) and the Linnean Collection 



(about 1 ,800 volumes by and about the 
great Swedish naturalist who estab- 
lished the system of Latin names still 
used for plants). In addition to these two 
collections of early botanical literature, 
the library also contains the William 
Campbell Steere Bryological Library of 
1,000 volumes and 6,000 published 
papers on mosses, liverworts and their 
relatives. 

In an effort to preserve the physical 
condition of the materials in its care, the 
library maintains an in-house book 
bindery/book restoration unit to repair 
and restore the older and more fragile 
books and papers in the collection. On 
a limited, fee-for-service basis, the skills 
of the Garden's book restorers are util- 
ized by other libraries in the St. Louis 
area. The Garden's bindery also pro- 
vides occasional classes and work- 
shops for those interested in bookbind- 
ing, paper marbling, and related crafts. 

Since 1970, the cataloguing staff of 
the library has been recataloguing the 
collections of books and periodicals, 
and since 1977, these cataloguing rec- 
ords have been put into a nationwide 
computer data bank (OCLC, INC.) to 
share with more than 3,000 other li- 
braries in this country and abroad. Until 
this project is completed, researchers 
should check both the new and the old 
card catalog to determine if the library 
has the literature they require. Since 
most of the library has been recat- 
alogued, it is advisable to look first in 
the new card catalog (distinguishable 
by yellow labels on the drawer fronts). 

The library is open for research use 
from 8:30-5:00, Monday through Friday. 
Members of the Garden and the adult 
public are welcome to use the library, 
but are requested to call in advance. 

— James Reed, Librarian 




For Younger Members 



In A Shovelful of Soil 




April and May are the months when 
St. Louisans "dig in," preparing plant- 
ing beds and setting out plants. Dis- 
cover what soil is made of as you and 
your child "dig in" together. 

You will need: Small hand trowel or 
large, sturdy spoon; shallow box lined 
with plastic; newspaper; magnifying 
glass. 

What to do: Select the planting 
area in which you and your child will 
work. As you begin to dig in the soil, talk 
with your child about how the soil looks 



and feels. Is it wet? Is it crumbly? What 
color is it? Look for soil particles, such 
as rocks, sticks, roots, leaves or seeds. 
Does your child recognize any of 
these? Are there any live creatures in 
the soil? What are they? Observe their 
movements. 

Spread some of the soil out on an 
old newspaper and look at it carefully 
with the aid of a magnifying glass. What 
more can your child see? Recognize? 
Shovel some soil into the plastic-lined 
box. Gently water the soil in the box 
and leave it in a sunny location. If seeds 
are present in the soil, small plants may 
begin to grow. Keep the soil moist and 
observe what happens to it over a pe- 
riod of days. 

Just for fun, dig up a spoonful of soil 

somewhere else in your yard. Does it 

have the same appearance as the soil 

which is in the box? 

—Ilene Follman, Education Department 



Award to Garden for 
Education of Children 




With Peter H. Raven is Mary Miehaus, Vice-Pres- 
ident of the St. Louis Association for the Educa- 
tion of Young Children. 

Dr. Peter H. Raven, Director of the 
Garden and initiator of progressive Gar- 
den educational programs with more 
than 50,000 participants each year, was 
the first recipient of the "For the Love of 
Children" award presented by the St. 
Louis Association for the Education of 
Young Children (SLAEYC). 



Serving the educational needs of 
young children, the SLAEYC is a 
branch of a national association of 600 
organization members devoted to de- 
veloping early childhood education and 
voicing the needs of young children. 
The award honors those in the com- 
munity who are dedicated to providing 
effective ongoing educational programs 
for young children and creating new 
avenues for childhood development. 

The Garden has been instrumental 
in developing early childhood educa- 
tional programs for thousands of chil- 
dren who visit each year. The Garden's 
Education Department sponsors clas- 
ses to develop young children's inter- 
ests in nature, and provides self-guided 
tour packets for group hikes through 
the Garden. Children under the age of 6 
also receive free admission to the Gar- 
den to encourage more frequent visits; 
the Garden hosts a series of Saturday 
morning activities for young children 
and their parents. 



Closing Event— Week of the Young Child 



During the week of April 17-23, the 
St. Louis Association for the Education 
of Young Children (SLAEYC) will cel- 
ebrate the Week of the Young Child. 
The Garden will host the closing event 
of the week on Saturday, April 23, 9:30 
a.m. -2:00 p.m. Activities, ranging from 
performances to puppetmaking will be 
in store for children ages 3-7. Admis- 
sion to the Garden on April 23 will be 
8 



free for families who are accompanied 
by children under the age of eight. Take 
advantage of this opportunity to share a 
special experience with your young 
children in the Ridgway Center and 
throughout Garden grounds. 

In celebration of this Week a special 
Sunday Brunch for Children has been 
planned for the following day, April 24, 
from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. 



Notes for Younger Members 

For the last year and one-half we've 
been publishing special features for 
younger members. If you've enjoyed 
those, watch for our June, 1983, issue. 
The Younger Members page will have a 
new look and will also be expanded to 
include more information and activities. 



Speaking of activities, a reminder that 
The Collector's Bag gives young visitors 
a chance to explore nature in the 
Garden by collecting leaves, twigs, 
rocks, and other objects from the 
ground. Check at the ticket counter for 
bags and instructions 

Even more activities are planned for 
school children of all ages who want to 
make this summer an exciting, educa- 
tional one. Watch for Summerscape in 
your mail; it lists 15 classes and work- 
shops planned for you this summer at 
the Garden 

Finally, a new map of the Garden will 
soon be on sale. Called the Discovery 
Map, it shows places in the Garden of 
special interest to our Younger Mem- 
bers. Look for it early this summer. . . . 

'Til next time, The Education Department 

Comment 

(continued from page 2) 

sary to keep them up to par. 

In order for us to continue providing 
high quality programs and services for 
all our visitors, for senior citizens and 
the disabled, for students— and for the 
countless people we reach indirectly 
but who never visit here — we need to 
gain a new financial base. We are cer- 
tain that the creation of the botanical 
garden subdistrict of the Zoo-Museum 
Tax District is the best means of pro- 
viding this underpinning of support. 
Under the property tax proposed to 
support the subdistrict, which calls for a 
tax of 4 cents per $100 assessed val- 
uation, a property owner with a $75,000 
home (fully assessed) would pay just 
$10 more per year in taxes. 

The Garden is a vital part of the 
quality of life in St. Louis. We urge you 
to vote YES on Proposition 4 and to 
help us continue serving our com- 
munity to the best of our ability. 



CfetLK 'UGr(< 



CU^/ 



CALENDAR 



While you're making your Spring Chore list, add a "thing- 
to-do" for yourself. Somewhere among the items which read, 
no doubt, "Paint trim," "Till garden," or "Wax car," note: 
"Visit Garden." With all you have to do, you owe yourself 



April 



St Louis' own Thomas Stearns Eliot may have said "April is the cruelest month," but 
if he ran his eye down our calendar for the month, he might have changed his mind 



APRIL 1-6 

April 1-3: 

April 2: 

April 3: 

April 5: 

APRIL 7-10: 

April 9: 

April 9-10: — 
APRIL 10-16 

April 14-15: 

April 16-17: 
APRIL 17-23 

April 23: 

April 24-30: 



April 24: 
April 30: 



Working: a play by Theatre Project Co. Ridgway Center, 8 
p.m. on all days, and 2 p.m. matinee on 4/3. A play with music 
based on Studs Turkel's book: a celebration of the American 
way of work-life. Call the Theatre for information. 
Easter Egg Hunt. Garden Grounds. 1 p.m. Children from 1 to 
10 are invited to. well, like the name, hunt Easter Eggs. A 
coloring contest is planned, as well as a visit from T. Easter 
Bunny. (T, of course, short for his first name, The.) 
Easter Sunday Brunch. Gardenview Restaurant, 11 am - 
1 p.m. The perfect meal: the food is good, you don't have to 
fix it. we wash all the dishes 

Election Day: Your local poll. 6 a.m. -7 p.m. Vote for Proposi- 
tion 1. 2. 3, 4 

Working (same as above, except no Sunday Matinee) 

Arbor Day Celebration. Garden grounds, 12:15 p.m. We'll 
read the winners in the essay contest Plus, free tree seed- 
lings to the first 1,000 visitors. 
African Violet Society Show. Ridgway Center. 9 a.m. -5 p.m. 



Spring Plant Sale for Members. Garden Gate Shop. 9 am - 
6 p.m. Save 20% on everything in the Plant Sales Depart- 
ment. 
Spring Plant Sale Open to Public 

Week of the Young Child Celebration. Ridgway Center And 

Grounds. 9:30 a.m. -2 p.m. All sorts of things for the Young 

and the Young at Heart 

Children's Brunch. Gardenview Restaurant. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. 

What's Cooking? Bring your children or grandchildren and 

find out. 

Flower Sunday. Christ Church Cathedral. Downtown; the 

94th annual celebration of God's Green Earth. 

Carolyn Forche/River Styx P.M. Shoenberg Auditorium. 8 
p.m. A reading by the recipient of the coveted Yale and 
Lamont prizes for poetry. Call 725-0602 for information. 
Carnivorous Plants Exhibit. Climatron. 9 a.m. -5 p.m. and 
10 a.m. -7:30 p.m. beginning on 5/1 . We have representatives 



something for you. And we have a lot going on. Clip this page 
and post it; circle the items you want to remember, and then 
come to the Garden: do something nice for yourself this 
Spring. (And, oh, don't forget our classes, either.) 



May 



Grammar Lesson: For those in school, there s only a little more than a month left, but 
here's a lesson on VERBS for May. Namely, verbs you can experience at the Garden. 
Listen (Music, poetry) Run (a race) Save (Money in a plant sale) See (a movie) Eat (ice 
cream) Smell (roses) and some others: Stroll, relax, enjoy. 



MAY 1-7 

May 1 : 

May 5-6: 

May 7: 



May 7-8: 



Continuing: 
MAY 8-14 
Continuing: 
MAY 15-21 

May 15: 



May 21: 

Continuing: 

MAY 22-31 

May 22: 



May 23: 
May 28-29: 
Continuing: 



Classes 



fDafe indicated is the first meeting Number in parentheses after class title is the 
number of meetings, if there is more than one. Saturday Morning Activities are tor 
children and their parents.) Consult your Spring Course brochure for further information. 
Need one 7 Need help in registering 7 Call the Education Department at 577-5140. All 
classes are at the Garden s Ridgway Center, unless they are noted as occurring at the 
Arboretum. 

April 2 Composting Workshop 10 a.m. -noon 

April 5 Ground Covers in the Landscape 7-9 p.m. (3) 

Wildflower Walk (Arboretum) 9:30-1 30 
April 9 Saturday Morning Activity: Trees for Arbor Day 

10-11:30 a.m. 

Missouri's Birds (Arboretum) 9 a.m. -3 p.m. (2) 
April 12 Wildflower Walk (Arboretum) 9:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. 

April 16 Saturday Morning Activity: Exploring Photography 

10-11:30 a.m. 

Soil Preparation and Planning 9-11 a.m. 
April 19 Wildflower Walk (Arboretum) 9:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. 

April 20 Herbs: Uses and Culture 9 30 a.m. -2:30 p.m. 

April 24 Spring Flowers of the English Woodland 2-4 p.m. 

April 26 Wildflower Walk (Arboretum) 9:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. 

April 27 Evening Walk in the Japanese Garden 6-8 p.m. 

Growing without a Garden 7-9 p.m. (2) 

8-10:30 p.m. 



April 29 



Night Hike (Arboretum) 



April 30 

May 3 
May 5 
May 7 

May 10 

May 14 

May 17 
May 20 
May 21 



May 24 
May 26 
May 28 



May 29 



Garden open until 7:30. Tough day at work, at home, in 
general? Come on down to the Garden and. Ahhhhh! Every- 
thing's alright. 

Members' Herb Sale. Floral Display Hall. 9 a.m. -7:30 p.m. 
Save 20% on more than 15,000 plants to spice up your life 
Children's Film: 20.000 Leagues Under the Sea Shoenberg 
Auditorium— Noon. Watching this, you'll not forget to water 
your garden for a long while 
Herb Sale Open to the Public 

Ice Cream Social. Grounds. 1-4 p.m. Entertainment and Ice 
Cream, ice cream, and ice cream (You expected, maybe 
kumquats?) 
Carnivorous Plant Exhibit 



Carnivorous Plant Exhibit 



Mothers Day. Repay your mother (in part, anyway) for all 
those years: bring her to the Garden. There's Sunday brunch 
and a stroll through the nicest place this side of Eden. 
Horticulture Society Show. Ridgway Center, 9-7 30 p.m. 
Carnivorous Plant Exhibit 

Shaw Neighborhood Run. It begins in the Garden's parking 
lot and goes through one of St. Louis's best neighborhoods 
Call 664-2011 for information 

St. Louis Symphony Chamber Chorus Concert. Ridgway 
Center 8 p.m. Music and spring: What more does a spirit 
need? Call the Symphony at 533-2500 for information 
Rose Society Show. Ridgway Center. 9 a.m. -7:30 p.m. We 
don't know what Linnaeus would say, but Wm. Shakespeare 
said, "A rose by any other name would smell as sweet." 
Carnivorous Plant Exhibit (last day, May 30) 



of all of the known genera of carnivorous plants. Only, be 
careful around feeding it. 

Children's Movie: The Love Bug (Disney). Shoenberg Audi- 
torium, noon. Even if you're not a child, you can still come. 



Saturday Morning Activity: Meet the Honeybees 

10-11:30 a.m. 

Wildflower Walk (Arboretum) 9:30 am -1 30 p.m. 

Floral Arrangement 1-3:30 p.m. (5) 

Saturday Morning Activity: Corsage for Mothers' Day 

10-11:30 a.m. 

The Garden In Watercolors 9 a.m. -noon (6) 

Wildflower Walk (Arboretum) 9:30 a.m.-1 :30 p.m. 

Saturday Morning Activity: Your First Garden 

10-11:30 a.m. 

Spring Bird Walk 8:30 a.m. -noon 

Wildflower Walk (Arboretum) 9:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. 

Night Hike (Arboretum) 8-10:30 p.m. 

Saturday Morning Activity: Fun With Herbs 10-11:30 a. 

Transplanting and Seeding 9-11 a.m. 

Nature Photography (Arboretum) 9 a.m. -3:30 p.m. (2) 

Plant Communities of Missouri (Arboretum) 10 a m - 

2:30 p.m. 

Wildflower Walk (Arboretum) 9:30 a.m.-1 30 p.m. 

Evening Walk in the Japanese Garden 6:30-8:30 p.m. 

New Harmony Tour (two days) 

Plant Communities of Missouri (Arboretum) 10 am - 

2:30 p.m. 

Pick a Rose 2-4 p.m. 



Jill Mead To Manage Gardenview Restaurant 




The Garden is pleased to announce 
that Jill Mead, a popular St. Louis res- 
taurateur, has assumed the manage- 
ment of the Gardenview Restaurant in 
the Ridgway Center. 



Jill Mead 

Miss Mead brings to the Garden her 
reputation of excellence for food ser- 
vice in the metropolitan area. The menu 
includes weekly specials and Miss 
Mead's famous soups. A different soup 



will be offered each day; there will be 
close to 35 different soups. 

The menu also features: Mediter- 
ranean Lunch — Soup, Cheese and 
wine. Chicken salad on home-made 
white; Herbed Egg Salad on whole- 
wheat; Smoked Turkey with Russian 
dressing on Pumpernickel; Grilled 
Cheddar, Swiss and Tomato on Pumper- 
nickel; Rare Roast Beef on French 
bread; Hamburger, Cheeseburger Chil- 
dren's Bag (#1 Hot dog, Chips, Cookie; 
#2 PBJ, Chips, Cookie). Salads— Chef, 
both large and small; House vegetable 
—also large and small; cheese and fruit 
plates; fresh fruit desserts; sorbet; ice 
cream specialties; pastries; tropical 
shakes (Sound good?) 

The Garden and Miss Mead invite 
all members to come in and enjoy the 
restaurant during the beautiful days of 
spring. Is there anything more pleasant 
than lunch on the outdoor dining ter- 
race overlooking the Linnean House 
and the Spoehrer Plaza and the Latzer 
Fountain? 

Remember— brunch at the Garden 
on Sundays from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. 
The view and the brunch are spec- 
tacular. 



Winter Photography Contest Winners 



Ron Kovach and his six-year-old 
son, Eric, showed recently that visiting 
the Garden and photography are two 
pastimes that members of a family can 
share. Ron Kovach was awarded first 
prize in the 1983 Winter Photography 
Contest for his entry in the Senior Divi- 
sion, Color Category. Eric received one 
of four honorable mentions awarded in 
the Junior Division (18 and under), 
Color Category. 

First prizes also went to Rick For- 
estal (Senior Division, Black and 
White), Kim Osborn (Junior Color), and 
Craig Higgins (Junior Division, Black 
and White). 

The judges also awarded 14 honor- 
able mentions in the four categories. 
For Color, Senior Division: William Hud- 
son, Charles Sherwin, and Jeannette 
Daugherty. For Black and White, 
Senior Division, Deborah Brown Han- 
sen, Charles Dana, Bill Hartman, and 
Dr. James Stockes. For Color, Junior 
Division: James Eaton, Jean Bordes, 
Eric Kovach, and Ari Schneider. In 
Black and White, Junior Division: Kim 
Majoras, Dana Rose, and Erik Dahms. 
There were more than 250 photographs 
submitted for the competition. 
10 




$50,000 Grant from 
Joyce Foundation 

The Joyce Foundation of Chicago 
has awarded to the Garden an addi- 
tional challenge grant of $50,000 since 
the Garden successfully met the sec- 
ond phase of a two-year, $1 00,000 chal- 
lenge grant. The Joyce Foundation is a 
philanthropic organization that makes 
grants in several fields primarily to mid- 
western, nonprofit organizations. 

In meeting the challenge, the Gar- 
den was required to enroll 1,000 new 
members and to receive increased con- 
tributions from existing Members total- 
ling $50,000. 

The Foundation also made an ear- 
lier grant to the Garden to enable Latin 
American botanists to participate in a 
symposium on the Flora of Panama 
project in 1979. 

Visit Tower Grove House to see the re- 
cently refurbished library. The walls 
were painted a light gray and wallpaper 
borders were added. It was the custom 
in the mid-19th Century to divide walls 
into panels, using stylish "fresco pa- 
pers," or imitations of artificial mold- 
ings to frame vertical rectangles. 

The Tea Room in Tower Grove 
House is open Tuesday and Thursday. 
Call for reservation by noon on Monday 
or Wednesday . . . 577-5150 




Being congratulated by Board President C. C. Johnson Spink (right) are Members of the Henry Shaw 
Fund Committee, (l-r) Mr. John C. Lathrop, Mr. Robert M. Williams, Jr., Mr. Alan E. Doede, Mr. Robert E. 
Kresko, Mrs. Robert H. Kittner, Mr. Kevin R. Farrell, and Mr L Patrick Ackerman. 



Henry Shaw Fund Success 

Congratulations and thanks to the 
Henry Shaw Fund drive committee for 
yet another successful effort. This 
year's campaign resulted in contri- 
butions of $526,236— a 35% increase 
over last year's drive. The committee 
included: Robert E. Kresko (Trammel! 
Crow Co.) and Harry E. Wuerten- 
baecher, Jr. (Union Electric), Co- 
Chairmen, and Patrick F. Ackerman 
(Ackerman, Inc.), Rosemary E. Carson 
(Centerre Bancorporation), Gary A. 
Close (Arthur Andersen and Co.), 
Charles A. Dill (Emerson Electric), 



Alan E. Doede (MFG Associates), 
Kevin R. Farrell (White Management 
Co.), George K. Hasegawa (Horner 
and Shifrin, Inc.), Mary Hillerich (Mer- 
cantile Bancorporation), John C. 
Lathrop (Arthur Andersen and Co.), 
H. Dean Mann (Ernst & Whinney), 
George S. Rosborough, Jr. (Measure- 
graph Co.), Charles M. Ruprecht, 
David L. Sliney (Monsanto), Franklin F. 
Wallis (Bryan, Cave, McPheeters & 
McRoberts), Robert M. Williams, Jr. 
(Williams Patent Crusher & Pulverizing 
Co.), and Mrs. Robert H. Kittner, Chair- 
man of the Phonathon Committee. 



Board Elects Officers 




At its January meeting, the Gar- 
den's Board of Trustees elected its offi- 
cers for 1983. Re-elected to a third year 
as President was C. C. Johnson Spink. 



William R. Orthwein and C. C. Johnson Spink 



William R. Orthwein, Jr. was re-elected 
as First Vice-President, and Louis S. 
Sachs was elected as Second Vice- 
President. 




Louis Sachs 
11 



Come to Colorado 




For seven days this summer, using 
the resources of the Nature Place, Gar- 
den Members can explore the moun- 
tains and rivers of one of the country's 
most beautiful states. They will visit 
fossil beds to observe remnants of the 
earth from 35 million years ago and 
have the chance to dig some of their 
own fossils as well. They will see the 
Sonoran Desert and tour Cripple Creek, 
one of the world's richest gold-pro- 
ducing areas. 

On the fifth day of the visit they will 
take a guided, all-day alpine excursion 
and enjoy beautiful timberline scenery, 
discover tiny alpine flowers, and ex- 
plore the historic mining areas in Lea- 
vick Valley. They will have the oppor- 



tunity to do some star gazing in an 
inflatable star lab. 

Throughout the entire trip, they will 
have the chance for evening hikes, 
early morning bird-watching, swim- 
ming, camp fires, cook-outs. 

The Nature Place, designated by 
the National Park Service as a "Na- 
tional Environmental Study Area," is 
part of the Colorado Outdoor Education 
Center. Situated on the back side of 
Pike's Peak, it is centered on 6,000 
acres of beautiful mountain land. It 
provides visitors with deluxe studio 
apartments constructed of natural 
wood, native rock, and large areas of 
glass. 

The leaders of the tour are Erna E. 
Eisendrath, a St. Louis botanist and 
author of the popular Missouri Wild- 
flowers of the St. Louis Area; Richard 
Coles, a St. Louis biologist and Director 
of Washington University's Tyson Re- 
search Center; and David Wilson, the 
Garden's environmental educator and 
coordinator of the ECO-ACT program. 

The cost for this tour is $400 and it 
includes meals, room and instruction 
and tours, and a $50 tax deductible 
contribution to the Garden. For children 
9 to 15, cost is $235; and for those 2 to 
8, it is $175. 

For those interested, there will be a 
program presented by Dr. Eisendrath 
and Dr. Coles in the Ridgway Center on 
Sunday, April 17, at 2:00 p.m. Call 577- 
5100 for information. 



A Garden Party with Bobby Short 




C 



AG 



\rdkxP\rtyWitiiB mm Sii 



The Garden Benefit on Saturday, 
April 23, promises to be a spectacular 
event. Entertainment will be provided 
by renowned pianist/vocalist Bobby 
Short and omelets will be made to order 
by "The Omelet Man" Rudolph Stan- 
ish. These attractions plus fabulous 
decorations by Stix, Baer & Fuller's 
designer Ray Pape will transform the 
Ridgway Center into a cabaret in grand 
style. Mr. Pape has provided the dec- 
orations for several other Garden bene- 
fits as well as benefits throughout the 
city. 
12 



The Black-tie evening will be in two 
parts. Dinner will be held beginning at 
6:30 p.m. in the Ridgway Center. The 
cost of $150 per person includes cock- 
tails and a private performance by 
Bobby Short, as well as the after-dinner 
festivities. Patrons ($250) and Bene- 
factors ($500) will receive preferred 
seating. 

Beginning at 9:00, cocktails will be 
served and there will be a cabaret pro- 
gram by Bobby Short, dance music by 
Encore Orchestra, and an omelet 
breakfast prepared by Mr. Stanish. 

For those not attending the formal 
dinner earlier in the evening, the cost of 
the after-dinner festivities is $75 per 
person; 32 and under, $50 per person. 

To make reservations mail checks 
payable to: A Garden Party, P.O. Box 
1421 F, St. Louis, Missouri 63150. 

Chairpersons for the benefit are 
Mrs. Robert Hermann, Mrs. Walter 
Stern, and Mrs. Warren Shapleigh. 




Receiving certificates from Alan Godlewski (cen- 
ter) are Edward Gildehaus and Regan Schall. 

Master Gardener: 
Education & Service 

A new program at the Missouri Bo- 
tanical Garden combines horticulture 
education and public service, two of the 
Garden's most important roles. 

Called Master Gardener, the pro- 
gram provides advanced training for 
amateur horticulturists. It was de- 
veloped by the Garden in association 
with the University of Missouri Exten- 
sion Service, and calls for an eight- 
week course of intensive work in sub- 
jects from plant physiology to insects 
and plant diseases to propagation. Par- 
ticipants are also required to attend the 
annual, 15-week Answer Service lec- 
ture series. In all, the training program 
involves more than 50 hours of instruc- 
tion. No fee is charged aside from the 
cost of any optional resource material a 
participant chooses to purchase— but, 
upon completion of the program, each 
Master Gardener must volunteer to 
spend an equal amount of time in com- 
munity service. 

The program was designed to en- 
able the Garden to meet increasing re- 
quests from the community for help in 
cultivating gardens, maintaining land- 
scapes, and solving problems related to 
plant care. Master Gardeners are avail- 
able to assist community groups and 
organizations as staff for plant clinics, 
as advisors for community gardening 
projects, or as horticulture seminar 
leaders. The Garden does not charge a 
fee to groups who use Master Garden- 
ers; interested organizations may call 
577-5140. 

In late February, the first class of 
Master Gardeners completed the train- 
ing program. All have been active with 
the Garden's Answer Service. They 
are: John P. Brown, Edward J. Gilde- 
haus, Gerald E. Tynan, Phyllis Phelps, 
Frank E. Hanchett, Barbara Kuhl, Ken- 
neth Lindenmann, J. Marshall Magner, 
Robert G. Schaeffer, Regan Schall, 
Carol Taxman, George J. Tribble, and 
Elmer W. Wiltsch. Instructors included 
staff members of the Garden and the 
Extension Service. 



Notes from the Garden 




Garden Membership 
Tops 15,000 



A.A.R.S. Honor to Lehmann 

The Anne L. Lehmann Rose Garden 
will receive the 1983 All-America Rose 
Selection's "Public Rose Garden 
Award" later this year. The award is 
made, once a year, to an outstanding 
United States rose garden if there is 
one the judges consider worthy of se- 
lection. 

The presentation will be made dur- 
ing the annual convention of the Amer- 
ican Rose Society, held this September 
18-21, at the Missouri Botanical 
Garden. 




John Behrer has been promoted to the 
position of superintendent at the Shaw 
Arboretum, a facility of the Missouri Bo- 
tanical (Shaw's) Garden located near 
Gray Summit, Missouri. In his new ca- 
pacity, Behrer will be responsible for 
the overall operation of the four square 
miles of prairies, woodland trails, vis- 
itors center, plant collections, and 
educational programs. Behrer pre- 
viously served as operations coordina- 
tor at the Shaw Arboretum and at- 
tended Colorado State University. . . . 

M. Jessica Ventimiglia has recently 
been appointed Grants Administrator at 



Rose Garden 

Displaying more than 4,000 roses, 
the Anne L. Lehmann Rose Garden 
was dedicated in 1976. It is one of 23 
test gardens for the All-America Rose 
Selections honor, awarded to the most 
outstanding rose varieties each year. 
Because the Garden is a test center, 
visitors have the opportunity to see the 
newest rose varieties several years 
before they are available for sale to the 
public. 

The rose garden is named for Anne 
L. Lehmann, long-time Garden sup- 
porter. 




M. Jessica Ventimiglia 
the Missouri Botanical Garden. She will 
be responsible for accounting, main- 
tenance, and other tasks related to the 
more than $1 million in grants the Gar- 
den receives annually for support of its 
education, research, and library ac- 
tivities. 

Ms. Ventimiglia previously worked 
on special projects for the Garden's 
Controller's Office. Prior to joining the 
Garden's staff in 1977, she was an 
Assistant Research Statistician for Ral- 
ston Purina and a Budget Analyst for 
Monsanto. She holds a Bachelors de- 
gree in Mathematics from Fontbonne 
College 




With Mr. and Mrs. Buescher is Mrs. Shadrach F. 
Morris, Jr., (I) President of the Members' Exec- 
utive Board 

Marlene Buescher of Chesterfield, 
MO., became the 15,000th member of 
Missouri Botanical Garden when her 
husband bought her the membership 
as a gift on December 6, 1982. To mark 
the record Mrs. Buescher participated 
in the dedication ceremonies for the 
Beaumont Room at her first member- 
ship event, the Orchid Preview Party on 
January 28. 

"I am simply delighted with this rec- 
ognition. We have always enjoyed the 
Garden and are happy to help it 
achieve this milestone," Mrs. Buescher 
said. 

Membership for the Garden has in- 
creased by 11 percent over last year's 
total. In the past 12 years, membership 
has risen from 2,500 to 15,000 people, 
a 500 percent increase 

Botanical II, the sequel to the popular 
travelling exhibit, 500 Years of Botanical 
Illustration, has been touring the middle 
west, to much acclaim, in the last few 
months. The exhibit, consisting of 82 
drawings, paintings, and illustrations 
from the Garden's collection of almost 
5,500 examples of botanical illustration, 
is a joint project of the Garden and the 
Mid-America Arts Alliance. The M-AAA 
reports that the exhibit has been sched- 
uled into September, 1985, throughout 
the five states served by the Alliance: 
Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Ne- 
braska, and Arkansas. The Alliance 
reports also that there is much interest 
in the exhibit beyond the area it serves 
and that Botanical II will be shown in 
several other states and Canada. 
M-AAA commissioned the Garden to 
create Botanical II because the first 
exhibit was the most popular travelling 
exhibition in the history of the Alliance. 



13 



Tour Guides Honored 

The Garden recently honored Hazel 
Lowenwarter and Katherine Chambers 
for outstanding service as volunteer 
tour guides at the Garden. Both women 
have led group tours through the Gar- 
den for more than 5 years and were 
recognized during a reception celebrat- 
ing their 80th birthdays. 

"Volunteering as a Garden tour 
guide offers me a chance to meet 




World renowned mime Marcel Marceau recently 
visited the Garden. 



Peter H. Raven, the Garden's Director, 
was recently elected as a member of 
the Council of the National Academy of 
Sciences. The 12-member Council is 
the governing board of the 120-year-old 
N.A.S. which was created by legislation 
signed by Abraham Lincoln. The Acad- 
emy now has almost 1,400 members 
who are elected for distinguished con- 
tributions to the sciences. It publishes a 
journal, The Proceedings of the National 
Academy of Sciences, organizes sym- 
posia, and convenes meetings on 
issues of particular importance and 
urgency— such as the impacts of 
changes in the federal budget for 
research and development. 

Dr. Raven was elected to the Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences in 1977. . . 



people and share my knowledge of the 
Garden and plants," said Mrs. Loewen- 
warter. "Being 80 years old is a plea- 
sure, especially because I am able to 
be so active." 

More than 500 volunteers of all ages 
contribute their time to the Garden and 
are a vital part of its operation. The 
volunteers participate in developing the 
Garden's education, display and re- 
search programs and also provide a 
public gardening information service. . . 




With Garden Director, Peter H. Raven are Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward L. Bakewell, Jr., in the new 
Bakewell Court on the west side of the Linnean 
House. Made possible through a gift of the Bake- 
wells, the Court was designed to complement the 
architecture of the Linnean House, the oldest 
public greenhouse in the country. Mr Bakewell is 
president of Bakewell Corp., a commercial-indus- 
trial real estate brokerage, development, and 
consulting firm. 



Lots of news from the Garden Gate 
Shop. For instance, the annual 
Spring Plant Sale opens to Members 
on April 14-15 and offers them a 20% 
discount on all merchandise in the 
Floral Display Hall and Plant Sales 
Department of the Garden Gate 
Shop. It's a perfect time to purchase 
everything you'll need to make your 
home and yard the best it's ever 
been 

And, the Spring Herb Sale, very pop- 
ular last year, is back, offering more 
than 15,000 herbs ready for planting. 
Imagine cooking with your own fresh 
herbs, and (here's the good part) sav- 
ing 20% when you buy them. It's in 
the Floral Display Hall 

A new feature of the Garden Gate 
Shop opens in April: an outdoor plant 
patio, offering hard to find perennials, 
hostas, hardy boxwoods, and more. 
The staff thanks, by the way, Isabelle 
Morris and all the other volunteers 
who worked so hard to make the out- 
door plant patio such a fine attraction. 



And Brown-Jordon Outdoor Furniture 
is available to Members, through May 
31, at a 20% discount. Order it 
through the Garden Gate Shop; 
please allow 6 weeks for delivery. . . . 



Violets for All Seasons is the theme for 
the 1983 African Violet Show. Spon- 
sored by the Metropolitan St. Louis Afri- 
can Violet Society, the Show— the 29th 
sponsored by the Society— will be held 
in the Ridgway Center on Saturday and 
Sunday, April 9-10, from 9 a.m. until 5 
p.m. The Society anticipates that more 
than 300 African Violets will be dis- 
played; awards will be given in 46 
classes. 

The African Violet Society, affiliated 



with the African Violet Society of Amer- 
ica, provides information on the culture 
and arrangement of African Violets. 
Persons interested in the Show may 
call 725-8185; those wanting to join the 
Society may do so at the Show or may 

call 962-7312 

As a center for horticulture, the Missouri 
Botanical Garden works closely with 
more than 200 societies and garden 
clubs in the St. Louis area, providing 
assistance and information 



New Members 



January-February 1983 



Sponsoring Members 

Ms. Velma R Boyer 

Mr and Mrs Robert E. Lilley 

Mr and Mrs. Arthur A. Zeis, Jr. 

Sustaining Members 

Ms Catherine R. Abramson 

Ms Mary Appuhn 

Ms Edna Duenckel 

Mr. Thomas J. Guinan 

Mr. and Mrs Norman L. Krause 

Mr and Mrs. Herbert A Mack 

Mr Stanley R. Mitchell 

Mr David L. Sliney 



Contributing Members 

Mr. John Abramson 

Mr. John D Adams 

Mr Joe Adorjan 

Mr. and Mrs Donald M. Albers 

Mr, and Mrs William L. Bartz 

Dr. and Mrs. John Biggs 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Black 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J Bodme 

Miss Marjone J. Borgmann 

Ms. Carroll B. Christie 

Mr and Mrs. Frederick L. Dierker 

Mr James Doyle 

Mr. Merle L. Engle 

Mr. and Mrs. Parker W. Fritschle 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles W Groennert 

Ms. Iris V. Habermaas 

Mr. and Mrs. John H Harwood 

Mr. Bruce Homeyer 

Mr, Thomas P. Howe 

Mr, and Mrs. John Hudson 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip A. Hutchison 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs Francis X Kaiser, Jr. 

Ms, Betty R. Lee 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald H. Lindner 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry F. Luckel 

Ms. Catherine Mallinckrodt 

Mr and Mrs. Brian Matheny 

Mr Ralph E. Meahl 



Mr. James R. Meeker 

Mr and Mrs William C. Nusbaum 

Ms Lois Olsen 

Mr and Mrs Charles O. Planting 

Mr. and Mrs James Ruyle 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert G. Schaeffer, Jr 

Mrs. Elizabeth J. Shands 

Ms. Marie Simmons 

Mr. James P. Sinclair 

Sisters of Most Precious Blood 

Mr and Mrs. Robert W. Staley 

Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Vincent 

Mr. and Mrs. Adolph H. Wende 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Winkler 



14 



Increased 
Support 

Sponsoring Members 

Mr. Kevin R. Farrell 

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Horlacher 

Mrs Willard King 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene A. Knackstedt 

Mr. and Mrs Joseph W Losos 

Mr. and Mrs Chalmers A. Macllvaine 

Mr. and Mrs. J. K, VerHagen 

Ms. P. Lynn Wakefield 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Williams. Jr. 

Sustaining Members 

Dr. and Mrs Morris Abrams 

Mr. G R. Blackburn 

Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Brubaker 

Dr. and Mrs. John J. Dann. Jr. 

Ms Janice K Flanery 

Mr. and Mrs James B George 

Mr. and Mrs Joseph P. Hopkins 

Mr. and Mrs Kenneth M. Klaus 

Mr, and Mrs. Russell A LaBoube 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Lorenz 

Mr and Mrs. Charles MacVeagh 

Miss Phyllis McPheeters 

Mr. Greg S Niedt 

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Pettus 

Mr. and Mrs. William E Remmert 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Rogers 

Mr James L. Sloss. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel R. Stark 

Mr. and Mrs Marcus T. Theodore 

Mrs. C. T. Wilson 



Contributing Members 

Mr. and Mrs William F. Allison 

Mr. and Mrs. Van-Lear Black III 

Mr. and Mrs. Dolph O Boettler 

Mr. and Mrs. S. John Bono 

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Braun 

Mr. and Mrs. Eric Brunngraber 

Mrs. Grace R. Brod 

Ms Peggy Brouillet 

Dr. and Mrs. David H. Brown 

Mr. and Mrs Dennis Bruns 

Mr. and Mrs Wallace L. Carnker 

Mr. and Mrs Richard W. Cary 

Mr. and Mrs. James D Cherry 

Ms. Janice C. Clements 

Mr. and Mrs. Cornell H. Eckert 

Mr. Donovan Eller 

Mr. Richard Ernst 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Giddings 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Hanpeter 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel F. Harrison 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Hegel 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson L. Hower 

Mr. and Mrs T. J. Jarrett 

Mr. and Mrs. Norvell G Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. M Kataoka 

Dr. and Mrs. Jack Kayes 

Ms. Anna M. Keithler 

Mr. and Mrs Clinton W. Lane. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Leslie 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Liman 

Mr. William G. Longheinnch 

Mr. and Mrs. O. M. Lowry 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. MacDermott 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Mendel 

Miss M. C. Morfeld 

Mrs. Virginia Mueller 

Mr. John Pickett 

Mr. Earl Rosen. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. David E. Schoeffel 

Mr. and Mrs Arthur F. Schulz. Jr 

Mr. and Mrs E. J. Senn. Jr. 

Dr. Robert J. Slocombe 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl A. Smith 

Mr Leroy Stephens 

Mr John L. Walker 

Miss Jane Weber 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Wendel 

Miss Dolores Wildhaber 

Mr Bernard S. Wildi 

Mr Tom Williams 



Tributes 

January-February 1983 

IN HONOR OF: 

Paul Armin 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Bodenheimer. Jr 

Mr. Edmund Banashek 

Marv and Myra Grossman 

Mrs. Joseph Bascom 

Mrs. Martha N. Simmons 

Leon Bodenheimer 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lelewer 

Louise Golman 

Dr. and Mrs. Harold Cutler 

Mr. and Mrs. William Hedley 

Associated Garden Clubs of Clayton 

Mrs. Richard Hellman 

Mr and Mrs. John Isaacs, Jr. 

Carolyn and Jim Singer 

Robert Herman 

Missouri Botanical Garden Guides 

Miss Emily Liberman 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Demba 

Mrs. Hazel Loewenwarter 

Mrs. Jean Bloch 

Mr. and Mrs Joseph Wollenberger 

Mr. and Mrs Paul Lowenwarter 

Mr. Steve Wollenberger 

Mr. Richard Wollenberger 

Miss Andrea Lowenwarter 

Mr. David Lowenwarter 

Mrs. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. and Mrs. A T Primm III 

Mr. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvard Hecker 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 

Kathy and Ollie Siegmund 

Mr. and Mrs Robert S. Turner 

Mr. John K. Wallace, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs. Bruce R Yoder 



IN MEMORY OF: 
Mr. Hugh W. Baird 

Mrs. John G. Burton 

Mrs. Dwight W. Coultas 

Mr and Mrs. Edwin R. Waldemer 

John R. Barsanti 

Alice Cox 

Dan and Jane Goetz and Family 

Mrs. Lucille B. Barsanti 

Alice Cox 

Dan and Jane Goetz and Family 

Miss Virginia E. Barth 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Hermon 

Mrs. Florence Bergman 

Robert Gaubatz Family 

Mrs. Marian Gierse 

Mrs. Hilda Haida 

Norman G. Hannig 

Charles Iselin 

John P. Jones 

Mrs. Ruth Krause 

McKay's 

Norfolk Southern Corp., 

Traffic Sales/Pricing Depts. 
Charles D. Mueller, Interiors 
Carol J Philipak 
Mr. Earl Rosen, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Al Sankis 
Mrs. R. E. Smyser, Jr. 
J. Wuller 

Miss Anna G. Blahovec 
Miss Irene Steinman 
Mrs. Agnes Blair 
Virginia L. Burnett 
Byron Cade 
Carolyn Martin 
Mrs. Theron Catlin 
Mary Elizabeth Bascom 
Mrs. Dora Claggett 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gahr 
Mr. Coleman Cornblet 
Alame M. Arndt 



Mrs. James A. Corrigan 

Mr, and Mrs, Joseph Corrigan 

Mr. Richard Cramm 

Jeanne Norberg 

Mrs. Wayman Crow 

Mrs Teddy H. Stauf 

Mr. Urban Dames 

Mrs. Gloria Hogbin Luitjens 

Beatrice Deyo 

Mary L. Kerwin 

Mr. Harry Duetscher 

Linda and David Yawitz 

Mr. William N. Eisendrath. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C Purk 

Mr. and Mrs. Morton Lange 

John Erlich 

Teel Ackerman 

Martin Israel 

Mrs. Violet Evers 

Dr. and Mrs. Armand D. Fries 

Miss Aurora Leigh Frederick 

Miss Florence Freyermuth 

Helen French 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Luecke 

Henry G. Fritz 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Fritz 

Mrs. Gladys M. Funsten 

Mr. Joseph Bettencourt 

Miss Edna Cornell 

Mrs. Kenneth Davis 

Mary Frances Hazelton 

Mr and Mrs. David R. Hensley 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Horan 

Mrs. Eleanor Moore 

Georganne F. Pollnow 

Mr. and Mrs Warren M Shapleigh 

Louis Golterman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sharp 

Adelyn Gross 

Mrs. Ben H. Sentuna 

Mrs. Erwin Harms 

Mrs. Henry Rand 

Mrs. Chauncey Heath 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sharp 

Mrs. Fred Hermann, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Cunliff 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Eddy, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. A. Frank 

Mr. and Mrs. William R Orthwein. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Timon Primm III 

Mr and Mrs. Robert Sharp 

Mrs. Isadore (Miriam) Hirschman 

Hilda Feenberg 

Gary R. Jensen 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Koranyi 

Sally Lubeck 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Rochberg 

Mrs. Helen M. Howell 

Mr and Mrs. L. J. Grigsby 

Mr. Robert A. Humber 

Mrs. John Torrey Berger 

Mrs. Betty Jo Meyer 

Florence Jones 

Mary and Bill Remmert 

Mrs. Elsie W. LaBarge 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Oertli 

Mrs. Charles A. (Inez) Lee, Sr. 

Miss Alice W. Roth 

Mrs. L. L Roth 

The Cape Bridge Club 

Mrs. Moody Lentz 

Bess J Corn 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Littman 

Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Littman 

Ms. Carol Littman 

Wilfred F. Long 

Dr. and Mrs Armand D. Fries 

Mrs. L. J. Grigsby 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Ring 

Mr. Dave Ludwig 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 

Mr. William Lustkandl 

Dr. and Mrs. Armand D Fries 

Jeannette McKinney 

Mina Sennott 



Scott Wilson McReynolds 

Sue Madison 

Mr. Garret F. Meyer 

Mrs. John G Burton 

Mrs H C. Grigg 

Mr. William Miller 

Mr, and Mrs. Dale W. Ehlers 

Miss Nell Mulberry 

Richard A. Clark. 

Adept Silk Screen Co 
Marion and George Herbst 
Miss Edith Murch 
Laurene Bamber 
Bess J. Corn 
Dr. Fred A. Couts 
Miss Virginia McMath 
Charles D Mueller, Interiors 
Virginia Rosenmeyer 
The Little Gardens Club 
Mrs. Jack Muren 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Sauer 
Mrs. John C. Naylor 
Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakm. Jr. 
Blanche Nifong 
Scientific Associates, Inc. 
Mrs. Helen Packman 
Ms. Joyce Lodato 
Tom Peterson 
Rosemary Bennett 
Dr. Pierece W. Powers 
George and Nadine Mahe 
St. Louis Herb Society 
Mrs. Margaret E. Presley 
Associated Clayton Garden Club No 4 
Mr. and Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 
Mrs. Lewis D. Dozier, Jr. 
Henry C. Probst 

Miss Bonzel R. Mooney 

Mark Adam Roth 

C. William Garratt 

Mr. and Mrs John A. Morrow 

George and Shirley Spaniel 

Harold R. Swardson 

Mrs. Elwood (Celeste) Rothaus 

Associated Clayton Garden Club No. 4 

Mrs. Dwight W. Coultas 

Mrs. Catherine Deans Roy 

R. G. and Berniece Fraser 

Mrs. W Judge 

Mrs. Margaret F. Spilker 

Dr. Russell W. Sappington 

Dorothy Becker 

Henry Scherck 

Mr. and Mrs Robert Sharp 

Molly Snodgrass 

Missouri Botanical Garden Guides 

Frederick Frank Stampehl, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Riley Bennett 

Mrs R. N. Hall 

Don Hoffmann 

Seeders and Cedars Garden Club 

United Van Lines. Inc. 
Data Processing Dept. 

Mrs. Catherine Strassner 

Mrs. S. A Wemtraub 

Mrs. Margaret M. Taylor 

Ms. Ellen F. Harris 

Mrs. Marie Spink Sweeney 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Calvin Christy 

Mrs. Florence Jones Terry 

Mrs L. G Vogler 

Mrs. Frances Vaughan 

Mrs. Andrew Brennan 

Mrs. Ray E. White III 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F. Boettcher, Jr. 

Mrs. Stephen (Harriett) Wolff 

Clayton Garden Club #4 

Josephine Green Wood 

Mrs. Dwight W Coultas 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam'l C Davis 

Mr. and Mrs Louis Frederik DuBois 

Mr. and Mrs Landon Y Jones 

Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 

The Garden Club of St. Louis 

Mr. Carl Walkenhorst 

Mr and Mrs. R. Leibengood 




The Garden in 
Sheffield Gray 

At left is Linnean in Sheffield 
Gray by artist Patrick Shuck, one of 
ten gum-bichromate prints Shuck 
exhibited recently at Maryville Col- 
lege. All ten prints use the interior of 
the Linnean House as their central 
image. In his Post-Dispatch review, 
critic Robert W. Duffy said, "Using 
this image as a skeleton [Shuck] 
adds color and overlays plant forms 
and clouds and various shapes to 
create the final product. ... In Lin- 
nean in Sheffield Gray, he makes ref- 
erence to his and [Garden founder 
Henry] Shaw's hometown, to what 
he remembers as the town's atmo- 
sphere ... but the general air of the 
prints is mysterious; it is as if the 
artist x-rayed the greenhouse and 
discovered haunting presences." 
Shuck himself, who immigrated to 
St. Louis from Sheffield a decade 
ago (as Shaw did almost 165 years 
ago), said, "The building was rem- 
iniscent of Sheffield to me— I was 
struck by this the first time I walked 
into it, before I knew that Shaw, like 
me, was from Sheffield. The Lin- 
nean House seemed to say some- 
thing to me about the man himself — 
it's indicative of Shaw and his times, 
of his thinking and the world he 
wanted to create. It shows the man 
as an artist; a thinking man creating 
a space for himself. The building 
seems to be full of moods— full of 
ghosts." 

Shuck is on the faculty of St. 
Louis Community College-Mer- 
amec. 



MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN-0026-6507) 

P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST. LOUIS, MO. 




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Annual 
Report 

1982 



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MISSOURI 

BOTANICAL 

GARDEN 

BULLETIN 



VOLUME LXXI • NUMBER 3 • MAY 1983 



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FROM THE PRESIDENT ♦ 



/f for no other reason that the com- 
pletion of the Ridgway Center, we 
could say that 1982 was one of the 
most eventful and successful years 
in the Missouri Botanical Garden's 
history The $ 9 million Center — 
funded entirely through the generous sup- 
port of individuals, corporations, and private 
foundations, in addition to a challenge grant 
from the National Endowment for the Arts — 
significantly increases the Garden's potential. 
Perhaps we could have called 1982 The Year 
of Promise and let it go at that, content in 
what we are hringing to the future of St. Ix)uis 
and the world. But speaking of the promise 
we have, the potential we have because of this 
new Center, would not truly give an accurate 
or complete description of the last year. 

Despite the enormity of the accomplish- 
ment of the new Center, because of the 
importance of our roles as educator, scientific 
institution, and horticultural center, we 
could not put forth any less effort toward the 
fulfillment of our responsibilities in these 
areas, regardless of whatever else was 
achieved. 

Perhaps, then, a more accurate name for 
1982 would be The Yearof Promise and Ful- 
fillment, for the year was successful in all 
areas: 

♦ In a year in which many school districts 
were cutting their budgets, the number of 
students participating in educational pro- 
grams here reached its highest level ever. 

♦ Our attendance increased once again at a 
rate in excess of 10% ; for the months follow- 
ing the opening of the Ridgway Center, it in- 
creased by more than 25%. 

♦ Much of the north end of the Garden was 
redeveloped; several new gardens were in- 
stalled. In addition, extensive work was done 
throughout the grounds to improve our ex- 
hibits. 

♦ Our botanical program, already the 



world's most active, had its most productive 
year ever, with our staff adding a third more 
scientific specimens than were added the 
previous year. 

♦ Our total membership, one of the most 
important indicators of our success in serving 
the public, surpassed 15,000. No other gar- 
den in the world has a membership as large. 

♦ The annual Henry Shaw Fund Campaign 
resulted in contributions totaling more than 
one-half million dollars, a 35% increase over 
1981. 

The only problems with the facts and fig- 
ures I have mentioned above is that they 
merely summarize the accomplishments of 
the year. They do not adequately express the 
diligence and enthusiasm of all who worked 
so hard, day to day — every one of 365 days — 
to bring about our success. Behind every 
class, every exhibit, every research project are 
hours of labor and support by staff members, 
volunteers, members, and contributors. 

The report that follows — and it is a good 
one — is a reflection of this work and support. 
Everyone behind the numbers, lists, projects, 
and programs included throughout these 16 
pages are to be congratulated and appre- 
ciated. They have made 1982 what it was, 
they have brought the Garden to where it is 
now: ranking as one of the finest botanical 
institutions on earth. 



Cuu 




— C. C. Johnson Spink 
President, Board of Trustees 



♦ FROM THE DIRECTOR ♦ 



rhe last decade has been one of 
the most important in the 
twelve-plus decades that the 
Garden has been in existence. 
Between 19^2 and 1982, the 
Japanese Garden, English 
Woodland Garden, and Anne L. I^hmann 
Rose Garden were constructed. The John S. 
Lehmann Building, the center of the world's 
most active botany program, was completed. 
There have, as well, been uncountable im- 
provements and expansions to all Garden 
facilities and programs; we are serving tens 
of thousands more visitors and more students 
now than we were in 1972. 

And in 1982, the Ridgway Center was 
opened. 

Throughout the planning and construc- 
tion of the Center, we have repeated that its 
operation would profoundly increase our 
potential for service. Although it was open 
for only the last five months of the year, this 
has been unquestionably borne out. While 
each of the other features we completed in 
the last ten years has added significantly to 
our ability to serve our visitors, giving us 
some of the finest garden displays in the 
world, the Ridgway Center brings us such a 
range of facilities that it affects every area of 
operation. 

♦ For the first time, the Garden has an all- 
weather facility for visitors; the effect of this 
was demonstrated in that, for the fall, with 
the Center our attendance was higher by 40% 
than in the previous year. In December, the 
increase in attendance approached 50% over 
the same month in 1981. This trend continues 
into 1983, during which time our attendance 
has been significantly higher than in the first 
part of last year, in which we did not have the 
benefit of the Center. 

♦ The Floral Display Hall, with its 5,000 
square feet of exhibit area, allows us to do a 
wider varietv of horticultural exhibits and 



other programs requiring a large, open area. 

♦ The additional classroom space means 
we can continue to serve effectively the ever- 
increasing number of students who turn to 
us for science, horticultural, and botanical 
education. 

♦ The Shoenberg Auditorium gives us the 
opportunity to offer more and different 
programs than did our previous public audi- 
torium. 

♦ The Spink Gallery adds another dimen- 
sion to our exhibits, allowing us to display 
some of the world's finest porcelain sculp- 
ture. 

♦ A Visitor Orienta- 
tion Theater acquaints 

"1" even the most casual 
visitor with our pro- 

Tw grams and displays, 
P^^f making visitor's time 

here more meaningful 
than ever before. 

♦ By moving our Ed- 
ucation department 
into the Ridgway Gen- 
ii ter, we are able to pro- 
vide more room for 
our research program 
which, although it is 

already the world's most active, has been 
expanding at a tremendous rate every year. 
The substantial increase in attendance fol- 
lowing the opening of the (.enter, along with 
the enthusiasm for the building and the fa- 
cilities it provides by those who have seen it 
and enjoyed what it offers, clearly demon- 
strates two points. One, that people see the 
Ridgway Center as a valuable resource in 
itself. Two, that they understand the impor- 
tance of the Garden's work in all areas and are 
excited by the new Center because they fore- 
see it greatly enhancing our displays, pro- 
grams, and service, enabling us to increase 
dramatically the effectiveness of our vital 




FROM THE DIRECTOR ♦ 



work. 

If there was one disappointment in 1982 — 
and it was a qualified disappointment at that 
— it was the defeat in August, hy voters, of a 
sales tax proposal which would have pro- 
vided much needed revenue for the com- 
munity in several different areas: economic 
development, tourism promotion, and sup- 
port of the community's major cultural insti- 
tutions, including the Garden. However, even 
in that defeat was a positive result. Those 
with whom we talked during the campaign 
affirmed that they saw the Garden as one of 
the areas most vital and important resources. 



This regard for us and all that we do was 
very obviously demonstrated when, in April 
of this current year, voters approved a 
measure which will now provide us with a 
critical financial base of tax support. 

The combination of the Ridgway Center 
and the new tax support places the Garden 
at the beginning of what could be its most 
productive era ever. 



Cjsj^ uQhi 



Peter //. Raven 
Director 




♦ RESEARCH ♦ 



^^^^T^^^ith each passing year, 
^^ M humanity loses more and 
f more of one of its most 
I / [/ valuable yet irreplaceable 

Mr WF resources — the world's 

r r tropical rainforests. From 

these areas have come plants that are today 
used as basic foods in our diets and essential 
medicines for our treatment of diseases. Reg- 
ularly our own scientists discover new 
species which have 



in 












<-^v 




potential as foods, 
medicines, and eco- 
nomic products that 
could — like rubber, 
corn, or rice — pro- 
foundly affect the 
world's peoples and 
economies. Yet, be- 
cause of pressure for 
development of trop- 
ical land, these areas 
are being destroyed at 
incredible annual 
rates. The total area of 
the rainforests is now equivalent to the size 
of Europe; last year an area equal to that of 
Great Britain was destroyed. Each week, an 
area equal to that of Delaware vanishes. As 
these areas are deforested, countless species 
of plants and animals become irretrievably 
extinct 

Because only about one-sixth of the 
tropic's estimated 3 million plant and animal 
species have been identified, and because 
almost a quarter of these are likely to become 
extinct by early in the next century, the Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden maintains the world's 
most active botanical program, striving to 
locate and study as many plant species as 
possible before they are lost forever. 

♦ During 1982. more than 120,000 spec- 
imens were added to our herbarium. This 
represented an increase of 33 % over the 



number added in 1981 and an increase 
of almost ^5% over the total added two 
years ago. 

♦ Our botanists did extensive research in 
Peru, Bolivia, Colombia, Nicaragua, Brazil, 
Ecuador, Panama, Costa Rica, South Africa, 
New Caledonia, and Mexico. 

Because of this extraordinary activity and 
the high quality of work performed here, the 
Garden is recognized as one of the world's 
leading centers of scientific research. 

♦ Almost 650 individuals and institutions 
borrowed a total of 43,878 specimens from 
the Garden's herbarium. This was an increase 
in loans of 30% over the number of loans 
made in 1981. 

♦ Almost one-third of these loans were to 
foreign scientists and institutions — an indi- 
cation of our international importance. 

♦ Additionally, another 300 individual re- 
searchers and institutions from 46 states and 
22 countries borrowed materials from our 
library which contains one of the world's 
largest collections of botanical literature. 

A further mark of the Garden's interna- 
tional stature was shown at the 29th annual 
Systematica Symposium, which concerned 
the relationship between the plants and 
animals of Eastern Asia and Eastern North 
America. Almost 400 scientists from 38 states 
and the People's Republic of China, Japan, 
Sweden, Canada, Mexico, and Venezuela at- 
tended. The 16 member delegation from the 
PRC represented the largest group of Chinese 
scientists ever to attend a botanical meeting 
in the Western Hemisphere. 

♦ In August, the Second International Sym- 
posium on the Biology and Taxonomy of the 
Solanaceae was held at the Garden. Attended 
by 200 scientists from around the world, the 
Symposium was concerned with current re- 
search in this economically important and 
diverse plant family which includes the 
potato, tomato, tobacco, pepper, and other 



RESEARCH ♦ 





plants of economic and medicinal value. In 
recognition of the importance and scope of 
its scientific work, the Garden received 
grants totaling more than $1,000, 000 for its 
botanical program. 

♦ A grant of $5 5, 000 from the Jessie Smith 
Noyes Foundation supports work in Costa 
Rica and Colombia as well as provides a post- 
doctoral fellowship in the herbarium. 

♦ A grant from the Andrew Mellon Founda- 
tion provides 5350,000 for the Garden's 
work in tropical Africa, tropical America, and 
Madagascar. 

— Marshall R. Crosby 
Director of Research 



♦ EDUCATION ♦ 




fifth grade student who panic- Partially because we foresaw this— that 
ipated in the Garden's ECO- fewer students might have the opportunity to 
ACT program this past year participate directly in our educational pro- 
commented, "I like ECO-ACT grams— and also because we were eager to 



because you ask a little ques- 
tion and you get a big answer." 

Mi 



expand our ability to serve even more stu- 
dents, we began to provide programs and 
«» facilities for teachers. For each ed- 

ucator we reached directly, we esti- 
mated we would indirectly reach 
thirty to fifty students or more each 
year since teachers would return to 
their classrooms with the informa- 
tion and materials we offered. 

♦ One of the most exciting facil- 
ities in the Ridgway Center is our 
teacher resource center, containing 
books, slide packets, and other ma- 
terials for use by teachers. Much of 
this material would not otherwise be 
available to educators. 

♦ In November, we held the first 
St. Louis Science Educators Sym- 
posium, designed to inform teachers 

In our age, with its rapid technological of recent advances in science and technology 




advances and our increasing awareness of the 
importance of science education, more and 
more people— teachers and students alike — 
are turning to the Garden for information and 
instruction; for the "big" answers to the 
apparently "little" questions. 



and to provide them with related curricula 
and materials. Teachers from 4 3 junior and 
senior high schools attended the Sym- 
posium. 

Other programs during 1982 offered some 
unique educational opportunities for stu- 



♦ In 1982, 51,710 students— more than in dents of many ages and backgrounds, 

any previous year— participated in programs ♦ Global Issues Day in October, developed 

at the Garden. This was an increase of 10% by the Garden and the St. Louis City School 

over 1981; 44% over 1980. Partnership Program, introduced 100 Stu- 

While the increase appears modest when dents to the problems, consequences, and 

compared with that of the previous year, we possible solutions to one of the world's most 

were extremely pleased since we had actually severe maladies: hunger, 

anticipated a decline in enrollment by stu- ♦ECO-ACT, developed two years ago, was 

dents. Because of the economic problems expanded to serve twice as many students as 

faced by many schools and school districts, in the previous year (485 as opposed to 262) 

there were sharp budget cuts by these institu- and provided grade school and high school 

tions, resulting in fewer funds being available students not only with important informa- 

for the costs of transporting students to the tion on environmental issues but also with 

Garden and other, similar institutions. basic skills they will need to solve en- 



♦ EDUCATION ♦ 



vironmcntal problems in the future. 

♦ Our participation in the national educa- 
tion program for senior citizens, Hlderhostel, 
provided an opportunity for adults of age 60 
or older to learn about Japanese gardens 
through our own Seiwa-En, the country *s 
finest Japanese Garden. 

♦ More than 2,000 young children and their 
parents attended the Gardens program 
during the Week of the Young Child, spon- 
sored by the St. Louis Association for the 
Education of Young Children. 

♦ The Living History program, held at Shaw 
Arboretum and which offers students a 
chance to learn about Ozark life in the 19th 
century by spending a week in a log cabin, 
drew more participants than ever before. 



The opening of the Ridgway Center per- 
mitted us to expand our educational work 
into less formal programs designed for even 
the most casual visitor. These included: 

♦ A natural history series, including lectures 
and films on wildflowers, prairies, and the 
Ozarks. 

♦ Plant Clinics, offered by the Horticultural 
Answer Service, and a Green Thumb series— 
both providing answers and suggestions for 
solution of problems faced by amateur gar- 
deners. 

—Judith H. Studer 
Cba irm a n of Edit ca tin n 




♦ DISPLAY ♦ 



rhe opening of the Ridgway 
Center in July of 1982 tre- 
mendously enhanced the exhi- 
bition facilities of the Missouri 
Botanical Garden, not only 
because of the facilities of the 
Center itself and not only because of the con- 
struction of gardens adjacent to and near the 
Center, but also because the Ridgway Center 
redefined the entire Garden for visitors by 
subtly inviting them to tour areas, gardens, 
and courtyards to which they were not nat- 
urally led when they entered through the 
flora date. 

♦ The Floral Display Hall, in which we held 
our Holiday Plant Exhibit in December, gives 
our show designers a flexibility they have- 
never before had, one which will allow them 
to be even more creative in staging the floral 
shows for which the Garden is already world 
famous. 

♦ The Spink Gallery — an unique exhibition 
facility for a botanical garden — lets our 
visitors enjoy some of the world's finest 
porcelain sculpture, and features procelain 
birds and flowers by Edward Marshall Boehm 
and the Boehm Studios. 

♦ Outside the Ridgway Center, we added 
the Spoehrer Plaza with its spectacular I.atzer 
Fountain, the Bakewell Court on the west 
side of the Linnean House and the Cohen 
Court on the east side, and the Swift Family 
Garden on the Houses south side. The 
Scented Garden was moved from the knolls 
and greatly expanded in its new location 
along the Garden's east wall, just north of the 
Flora Gate. We added a new Hosta Garden in 
memory of Marie Schaeffer Shields, adjacent 
to the Scented Garden. 

In addition to the work related to the Ridg- 
way Center and the development of the north 
end, there were a number of other exciting 
improvements and additions to the Garden. 

♦ A new Stream Bed Garden, constructed 



on the knolls, was made possible by a 
generous donation in memory of Ben Weis- 
man by Patsy Hilda Weintraub. Featuring 
hardy waterlilies and other water plants, the 
area will be at its peak in the summer of 1983- 

♦ We expanded the hardy rock garden on 
the east side of the Mediterranean House, in- 
stalling new plantings that are suitable for 
rock gardens in the St. Louis climate. This 
expansion was possible because of gener- 
ous contributions in memory of Audrey 
Heckman. 

♦ To the already 
magnificent field of 
100, 000 crocuses near 
the Henry Moore 
sculpture beside the 
John S. Lehmann 
Building, we added 
still another 15,000. 

♦ We began con- 
struction of a major 
addition to the English 
Woodland Garden in 
memory of Edward G 
Cherbonnier, located 
across the path from 

the current woodland area. 

♦ In all, and not including bulbs, we added 
more than 3,000 new plantings to the entire 
(iarden. 

♦ In Tower Grove House, the restored coun- 
try home of Garden founder Henry Shaw, 
there was extensive restoration and redecora- 
tion of the front stairway hall on both the first 
and second floors. As in past years, the House 
was decorated for the Christmas season after 
the manner of a Victorian holiday. 

♦ At the Garden's Shaw Arboretum, an 
observation deck was constructed on the Fx 
perimental Prairie Project hillside providing 
a magnificent view of the prairie and the sur- 
rounding countryside. Also 10,000 plants 
representing 52 different species were in- 




10 



♦ DISPLAY ♦ 



stalled into the prairie. 

Aside from all of the improvements and 
additions during 1982, the Garden continued 
to feature a variety of horticultural exhibits. 
In addition to the major floral shows — the 
Spring Flower Show, the Orchid Show, the 
Fall Flower Show, and the Holiday Exhibit, 
exhibits included: 

♦ In conjunction with the important Solan- 
aceae conference held in August, we 
mounted a display of the major species of that 
plant family including the commonly known 
economic species (tomato, potato, tobacco, 
pepper) and others which are of horticultural 
interest. 

♦ There were two exhibits with a religious 
emphasis; one for the Jewish holiday, Tu 
Bishevat(New Year of Trees), and one which 
showed plants which figure prominently in 
biblical texts and which are appropriate for 
plantings in St. Louis. 

+ There were also exhibits of bromeliads, 
waterlilies, carnivorous plants, cacti, roses, 
and staghorn ferns. 

The Garden also continued its pursuit of 
cultural exchange during 1982 with a major 
exhibition of art and a festival: 

♦ For the last four months of the year, we 
featured in the Flora Gate Building a major 
exhibit of Chinese Botanical Art, containing 
100 illustrations, watercolors, and line draw- 
ings of plants native to China. This exhibit 
was only the second time this art was on 
public display anywhere in the world; they 
were earlier displayed at the XIII Botanical 
Congress in Sydney, Australia, in 1981. 

♦ For the seventh time, we held our popular 
Japanese Festival during June. Attended by 
50,000 persons, the nine-day Festival fea- 
tured music, dance, food and crafts of Japan, 
and was sponsored by the Seven-Up Com- 
pany. 




— Steven A. Frowine 
Chairman, Indoor Horticulture 




— Alan P. Godlewski 
Chairman, Ixindscape Horticulture 




iJtJiKjiAr 



— John Behrer 

Superintendent, Shaw Arboretum 



II 



♦ COMMUNITY ♦ 



Agfrj 




^P^W rom the flower shows to educa- 

U * tional programs, from the 

^L^# expansion of our permanent 

U w displays to speeial admission 

m polieies for senior eitizens, 

^^» everything undertaken by the 

Missouri Botanical Garden is done to serve 

the residents of our community, the St. Louis 

area. 

During 1982, the 
Garden increased its 
involvement in com- 
munity affairs most 
notably by ereating a 
new position of Pub- 
lic Horticultural Spe- 
eialist who provides 
direet hortieultural 
WE& . a.SSJFv' ' -*^| information to the 
public through the media. 

♦ The Answer Service, our telephone ad- 
visory service for hortieultural prohlems — 
staffed completely by Garden volunteers 
— handled 12,000 questions from residents 
on all areas of gardening, landscaping, and 
plant eare. 

♦ Our professional staff horticulturists 
eooperated with the St. Louis City's beauti- 
fication program, Operation Brightside, by 
helping to transform a vacant city lot into a 
demonstration vegetable garden and by as- 
sisting those interested in rehabilitating other 
vacant lots. 

♦ Members of our staff also appeared reg- 
ularly on radio and television providing 
information on hortieultural teehniques; 
they were also an important resource for 
reporters from both print and electronic 
media, providing answers to questions about 
severe problems faced by area residents 
eaused by sudden changes in the weather or 
insect infestations. 

♦ The new Master Gardener program has 
multiplied our ability to reach further into the 



I J 



eommunity with our expertise by providing 
highly trained individuals as resources avail- 
able for plant clinics in the Ridgway Center 
as well as throughout the eommunity. 

♦ We continued our involvement in our 
own neighborhood eommunity through sup- 
port of and partieipation in the local, not-for- 
profit Housing Corporation which we helped 
form three years ago. This Corporation's 
objective is the revitalization of the residen- 
tial buildings in the area surrounding the 
Garden by promoting the rehabilitation of 
the structures. 

♦ Once again, we opened the Garden, free 
of charge, to senior citizens during the Orchid 
Show. Nearly 4,000 persons took advantage 
of the opportunity, representing a 60% 
increase over the number for 1981. 

♦ And on December 18, we invited all of the 
community to enjoy the Garden's holiday 
exhibits without admission charge as our 
annual Christmas gift to the people of our 
area; 3,0^ 1 visitors came that day. 

There are several obvious indications of 
our relative success at offering the com- 
munity residents the types of services and 
displays they desire; all of the measures lead 
us to the conclusion that — very simply — 
St. Louis likes what we are doing. 

♦ Our attendance increased by 12.5% over 
1982. There were 408,058 visitors last year 
as compared to 362,756 in the previous year. 

♦ Attendance from the opening of the Ridg- 
way Center through the end of the year (that 
is, approximately five months) was higher by 
more than 25 % over the same period in 198 1 
(297,930 over 165,539). 

♦ Our membership reached 15,302 — the 
highest total in our history. This represented 
an increase of 1 1 % over the total for 1981, and 
an increase of 512% during the last decade— 
from 19^2 when the membership total was at 
2,500. 

♦ Our membership total is the largest for 



♦ COMMUNITY ♦ 



-,«_ v *w' 




any botanical garden in the country. 

♦ The Henry Shaw Fund campaign, which 
supports the Garden's special programs, 
brought $526,236 in contributions to the 
Garden: a 35% increase over the total con- 
tributions for 1981. 

♦ The number of Garden volunteers 
reached its highest total ever — last year 506 
individuals selflessly gave of their time — 
41,100 hours in all — in all areas of the 
Gardens work. 

While we were extremely pleased with the 
very obvious support of our work by the 
community we are eager to increase our 
service to St. Louis. With the extraordinary 
facilities provided by the Ridgway Center — 
and the new financial base of tax support 
actually provided in early 1983 — we are 



confident that we will continue to offer new 
and different services in the future, all of 
which will be of equal or higher quality to 
those which we have been providing for the 
past 124 years. 




— Richard H. Daley 
Director of Public Programs 

— Earl K. Shreckengast 
Director of Development 



13 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



Missouri Botanical Garden Statement of Support and Revenue 
Expenses and Changes in Fund Balances for Current Funds 
For Year Ended December 31, 1982 

Public Support and Revenue 

Public support: 
Contributions and bequests 

The Greater St. Louis Arts and Education Council 
Memberships 

Total public support 
Revenue: 
Admissions 
Grants and contracts 
Net income from Garden Gate Shop 
Investment income, net 

Realized gain on investment transactions, net 
Other 

Total revenue 

Total support and revenue 

Expenses: 

Program services: 
Horticulture 
Research and library 
Education 
Arboretum 

Maintenance and improvements 
Utilities 
Security 
lower drove House 

Total program services 
Supporting services: 

Management and general 
Membership department 
Fund raising 

Total supporting services 

Total expenses 
Excess of Public Support & Revenue Over Expenses 

Other Changes in Fund Balances— Increase (Decrease): 

Property and equipment acquisitions 
Transfer of funds 

Fund Balances — Beginning of Year 

Fund Balances — End of Year 



/ / 



S 838,362 

572,250 

5 4 2,()9t 

$1,952,706 

S 581,312 
889,245 
101,604 
761,689 
85.669 
419,239 
$2,838,758 

$4,791,464 



S 616.851 

1 ,444,4 19 

213,486 

143,403 

349,257 

316,793 

1 15.330 

38,172 

$3,237,714 

$1,041,907 

2^2,370 

62,966 

$1,377,243 

$4,614,957 

$ 176,507 

(273.000) 
5-2 

3,251,624 
$3,155,703 



♦ FINANCIAL INFORMATION ♦ 



Public Support and Revenues, 1982 



Expenditures, 1982 

Membership and 
Fund Raising, 6.9% 



\rboretum, 2.9% 
Education, 4.4%> 




Other, 3.1% 



Income, 
Garden 
Gate Shop, 2.1% 




Property 

& Equipment 

Acquisitions, 5.6% 



Total Paid Membership, 1978 to 1982 





16,000 
15,000 
14,000 
13,000 
12,000 
11,000 
10,000 








15,302 










J5 




i.yoov 








5j 




12,013 






2 


10.911 










10.256 
















1 1 




1 1 











Year 



1978 1979 1980 1981 



1982 



Maintenance 

& Improvements, 7.1% 

Facts & Figures, 1982 

Total attendance 408,058 
Students in education 

programs 51,710 

Active volunteers 506 

Volunteer hours 41,100 
Total herbarium 

specimens added 127,173 
Horticultural 

accessions 2.5 15 



Other Financial Information: 



Additions to Endowment and Capital Funds: 
Contributions and bequests 
Investment income 
Realized gain on investment transactions 

Land, Building and Equipment Fund Balance: 
Beginning of Year 

Property and equipment acquisitions 
Depreciation 

Property retirements and transfers 
End of Year 



$4,313,801 

166.898 

100,611 

$4,581,340 

$14,984,576 
5,139,176 
(500,005) 
( 8,316) 
$19,615,431 



15 



♦ BOARD OF TRUSTEES, MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN + 



December M, I <)82 



Clarence C. Barksdale 

Joseph H. Bascom 

William H. T. Bush 

Dr. Thomas S. Hall 

Robert R. Hermann, Sr. 

Robert E. Kresko 

Stephen H. Loeb 

William E. Maritz 

William R. Orthwein, Jr. 

Marion K. Piper 
Lucianna Gladney Ross 



Louis S. Sachs 

Dr. Howard A. Schneiderman 

Warren M. Shapleigh 

Sydney M. Shocnbcrg, Jr. 

Tom K. Smith, Jr. 

Wayman F. Smith III 

C. C. Johnson Spink 

John K. Wallace, Jr. 

Robert C. West 

Harry E. Wucrtenbaecher. Jr. 



16 



Ex Officio Trustees 

Penelope Alcott 

President, Hoard of Education of 

the City of St. Louis 

Jules D. Campbell 

President, Academy of Science 

of St. Louis 

Dr. William H. Danforth 
Chancellor, Washington University 

Rev. Thomas R. Fitzgerald, S.J. 
President. St. Louis University 

The Rt. Rev. William A. Jones, Jr. 
Episcopal Bishop of Missouri 

The Honorable Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr. 
Mayor, City of St. Louis 

ADMINISTRATION 

Dr. Peter H. Raven, Director 

Dr. Marshall R. Crosby, 

Director of Research 

Richard H. Daley, 

Director of Public Programs 

Charles W. Orner, Controller 

Pat Rich, Special Assistant 

Farl K. Shreckengast, 

Director of Development 

Carol A. linger, Personnel Director 



EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Howard F. Baer 

Sam'l C. Davis 

Henry Hitchcock 

A. Timon Primm III 

Daniel L. Schlafly 

Robert Brookings Smith 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF 

TRUSTEES 

C. C. Johnson Spink, President 
William R. Orthwein, Jr., 

First I ice- President 

Robert R. Hermann, Sr., 

Second \ ice- Preside/it 

Charles W. Orner, Secretary 

Cheryl B. Mill, Assistant Secretary 



m 



Photography by Richard Benkof 

Graphic Design by Susan Wooleyhan 

Typesetting by Paragon Typographers, Inc. 

Printing by Garlicb Printing Company 

The MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN is published 
seven times a year, in February, April. May, June. August, 
October, and December by the Missouri Botanical Garden, 
2345 lower Grove, St. Louis. Mo 63110. Second (lass 
postage paid ai St. Louis. Mo J12. 00 per year SIS foreign. 
Postmaster: semi address changes to P O Box 299, St Louis. 
MO 63166. 



MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN-0026-6507) SECOND CLASS 

P.O. Box 299 POSTAGE 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 p A(D 



AT ST. LOUIS, MO. 



m 






m 




Volume LXXI, Number 4 
June 1983 

Includes Calendar for June/July 1983 




Missouri 

Botanical 

Garden 

Bulletin 




A Victory for St. Louis 

The entire St. Louis metropolitan 
area has won a tremendous victory. The 
voters in the City and County have ap- 
proved the proposals that will provide 
increased public support for the Zoo, Art 
Museum, Science Museum, and Botan- 
ical Garden. 

The approval of the 15-cent tax in- 
crease benefits far more than the indi- 
vidual institutions involved. The vote 
benefits the metropolitan area as a 
whole. These institutions are part of the 
cultural heritage of all who live in the 
area, whether they live in north or south 
St. Louis, Crestwood or Bridgeton, 
Ladue or Lemay, Normandy or Webster 
Groves. 

They are part of our memories of a 
St. Louis childhood. They are creating 
memories for our children and grand- 
children. They are part of what we mean 
when we say St. Louis is a great place to 
live and work. 

This vote means, of course, that 
each of the cultural institutions will be 
able to maintain its high standards and 
fulfill many plans and projects. But the 
vote reaches far beyond the institutions 
themselves. It sends a signal to our area 
and the nation that residents of St. Louis 
and St. Louis County stand together 
united with a common identity, common 
traditions and goals. It sends a strong 
message to those evaluating St. Louis 
as a possible site for living and working. 
It tells them St. Louis is an area that 
regards cultural enrichment as essential 
to a quality lifestyle. The St. Louis area is 
stronger because of this vote for our cul- 
tural institutions— a vote that strength- 
ens our sense of unity and identity. 

—Robert Hyland 



How many children have entered the Garden? How many discoveries has each made?— The 
Community and the Garden: a future together. (Photos: P. Deutschman) 



Because of periodic inquiries re- 
garding the meaning of the 
Garden's logo, we reprint here 
an explanation of it that was 
published in the Bulletin in July, 
1972, when the logo was first 
announced to Members. 



Y 



The genesis of the 
mark is the folk sym- 
bol for man 

Compounded to be- 
come men (mankind) 
abstracted to be- 



HENRY SHAW 
ASSOCIATES 

Anonymous 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Aronson 

Mrs Newell A. Augur 

Mrs Agnes F Baer 

Mr and Mrs. Howard F. Baer 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander M Bakewell 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward L Bakewell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence C Barksdale 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. and Mrs Carl L A Beckers 

Ms. Sally J. Benson 

Mr and Mrs. Brooks Bernhardt 

Mr and Mrs. Albert G. Blanke, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs. John G. Buettner 

Mr and Mrs. William H T. Bush 

Mrs. J Butler Bushyhead 

Mr. and Mrs. Jules D. Campbell 

Mrs. Jean-Jacques Carnal 

Miss Adelaide Cherbonnier 

Mrs. Fielding T. Childress 

Mr. and Mrs. Fielding L. Childress 

Mr. and Mrs Gary A Close 

Mr. Sidney S Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs Franklin J Cornwell, Sr. 

Dr. and Mrs. William H Danforth 

Mr Sam'l C. Davis 

Mr Alan E Doede 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Dohack 

Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Duhme, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Robert Edwards 

Mr. and Mrs. David C. Farrell 

Mrs Mary Plant Faust 

Mr. and Mrs. John H Ferring 

Mrs. Clark P. Fiske 

Mr and Mrs. Gregory D. Flotron 

Mr. and Mrs Robert B Forbes 

Mrs. Eugene A. Freund 

Mrs. Henry L Freund 

Mr. S E Freund 

Mrs Clark R Gamble 

Dr. and Mrs. Leigh L Gerdine 

Mr Samuel Goldstein 

Mr Stanley J. Goodman 

Mrs Mildred Goodwin 

Mr and Mrs W. Ashley Gray, Jr 

Mr and Mrs. W. L. Hadley Griffin 

Miss Anna Hahn 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas S Hall 

Mr and Mrs. Norman W. Halls 

Mrs. Ellis H. Hamel 

The Hanley Partnership 

Mrs Marvin Harris 

Mr. and Mrs. Whitney R. Harris 

Mr. George K Hasegawa 

Mrs. John H. Hayward 

Mr. and Mrs Harvard K Hecker 

Mr William Guy Heckman 

Mr and Mrs Robert R. Hermann 

Mr and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 

Mr and Mrs. Wells A Hobler 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Hunter 

Mrs. John Kenneth Hyatt 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley F. Jackes 

Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Jackson 

Mrs Margaret Mathews Jenks 

Mr. and Mrs J Eugene Johanson 







come plant form (bo- 
tanical). Reflecting 
the garden's dual 
concerns for man 
and the natural 
world. The insepar- 
able nature of both 
and, most important- 
ly, their "oneness." 

Also the process of 
research. 

A seed pod 



K& 






germinating 

Seeking the common 
denominator in the 
plant kingdom, the 
point at which most 
things look alike, so 
as to represent the 
entire kingdom and 
not one part . . . new- 
ness . . . growth. 

The two forms 
brought together. . . 
and divided, symbol- 
izing in their separ- 



ateness plant and 
man, in their sym- 
metry or reflection 
the interdependence 
of one upon the other 
to create a whole, a 
mutual reinforce- 
ment. Again, "one- 
ness." 

vJ|fl> The curved lower 

ivjI^j line: the 9 arden as 
vjjy' holding, cradling, nu- 

turing the whole: the 

earth. 



Mr. and Mrs Henry O. Johnston 

Mr. and Mrs Landon Y. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs W. Boardman Jones, Jr. 

Mrs A F Kaeser 

Dr and Mrs. John H. Kendig 

Mr and Mrs. Samuel M. Kennard III 

Mr and Mrs. Elmer G Kiefer 

Mr. A. P. Klose 

Mr. and Mrs William S. Knowles 

Mr. and Mrs Robert E. Kresko 

Mr. and Mrs. Hal A. Kroeger, Jr 

Mr and Mrs. Charles S Lamy 

Mr and Mrs. Oliver M Langenberg 

Mr and Mrs. Sam Langsdorf, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs John C. Lathrop 

Mr and Mrs John C. Lebens 

Mrs. John S. Lehmann 

Mr and Mrs. Willard L Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley L Lopata 

Miss Martha Irene Love 

Mr. and Mrs. H Dean Mann 

Mr and Mrs James A. Maritz. Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Maritz 

Mr. Harry B. Mathews III 

Mrs James S McDonnell, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs. Sanford N. McDonnell 

Mr and Mrs. Roswell Messing, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs. I. E. Millstone 

Mr and Mrs. Hubert C. Moog 

Mr. and Mrs John W Moore 

Mr. and Mrs Thomas M. Moore 

Mrs. W. Gillespie Moore 

Dr. and Mrs Walter L. Moore 

Mr and Mrs. Eric P. Newman 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred A Oberheide 

Mr. and Mrs C W Oertli 

Mrs. John M. Ohn 

Mr Spencer T Ohn 

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Orthwein, Jr. 

Mrs. Elizabeth R. Pantaleoni 

Mrs. Jane K Pelton 

Miss Jane E. Piper 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon W Piper 

Mrs. Herman T. Pott 

Mrs. Miquette M. Potter 

Pratt Buick. Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs A Timon Primm III 

Mr and Mrs Joseph A. Richardson 

Mr and Mrs F. M. Robinson, Jr. 

Mr. Stanley T. Rolfson 

Mr and Mrs G. S Rosborough, Jr 

Mrs Lucianna Gladney Ross 

Mr and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr and Mrs. Louis Sachs 

Mr and Mrs. Louis E Sauer 

Mrs. William H Schield 

Mr. and Mrs Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Thomas F. Schlafly 

Mrs. Frank H Schwaiger 

Mrs Mason Scudder 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Shaikewitz 

Mrs. A Wessel Shapleigh 

Mr. and Mrs Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mrs. Thomas W. Shields 

Mrs John M. Shoenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Shoenberg 

Mr and Mrs Sydney Shoenberg, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs John E. Simon 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings Smith 



Mrs. Tom K. Smith, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs Tom K. Smith, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs. Wallace H. Smith 

Mrs Sylvia N. Souers 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Hermann F. Spoehrer 

Mrs. Robert R Stephens 

Mr and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mrs Mildred E. Stifel 

Mr and Mrs. Cornelius F. Stueck 

Mr. and Mrs. Hampden Swift 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar L Taylor, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs Charles L Tooker 

Mr. and Mrs Joseph W. Towle 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack L. Turner 

Mr and Mrs. Edward J. Walsh, Jr 

Mrs Horton Watkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard K Weil 

Mrs S. A. Wemtraub 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben H Wells 

Mr. and Mrs B K Werner 

Mr. and Mrs O Sage Wightman III 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene F. Williams, Jr 

Mrs John M. Wolff 

Mr and Mrs. Donald D. Wren 

Miss F A Wuellner 

Mrs Eugene F. Zimmerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew R. Zinsmeyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Sander B. Zwick 

DIRECTOR'S 
ASSOCIATES 

Anonymous 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Bachman 

Mrs. Arthur B Baer 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Perry Bascom 

Ms. Allison R Brightman 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Pharr Brightman 

Mrs. Richard I Brumbaugh 

Mr. and Mrs G. A Buder. Jr 

Mr. Kurt A. Bussmann 

Mrs. David R Calhoun. Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C Champ 

Mr Maris Ciruhs 

Consolidated Grain & Barge Co. 

Mrs. Francis Collins Cook 

Mrs Robert Corley 

Mrs. Dwight W. Coultas 

Mrs. Elsie Ford Curby 

Mr and Mrs. John L. Davidson, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs. Henry P. Day 

Mr Bernard F Desloge 

Mrs. Joseph Desloge, Sr. 

Echo Valley Foundation 

Mr. Hollis L. Garren 

Mrs Christopher C Gibson 

Ms. Jo S Hanson 

Mr George K Hasegawa 

Mr. and Mrs. William J, Hedley 

Dr. and Mrs. August Homeyer 

Mrs. John Valle Janes. Sr, 

Mr. and Mrs M Alexander Jones 

Dr. and Mrs. David M. Kipnis 

Mr. and Mrs Harold Koplar 

Mr and Mrs. Thorn Lewis 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldrige Lovelace 

Mr. and Mrs. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. and Mrs. J Ben Miller 

Mr and Mrs Shadrach F. Morris, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. Donn Carr Musick, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs William L Nussbaum 

Mrs. Harry E. Papin, Jr. 

Mrs Jean M Pennington 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Perry 

Mrs. Drue Wilson Philpott 

Mrs Ralph F. Piper 

Mr. Dominic Ribaudo 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Richman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Ridgway 

Mrs Edward J. Riley, Jr 

Mrs John R. Ruhoff 

Mr and Mrs. Charles M Ruprecht 

Safeco Insurance Company 

Mr. Don R. Schneeberger 

Dr and Mrs. John Schoentag 

St Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Co 

Mr and Mrs. Leon B Strauss 

Miss Lillian L. Stupp 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold E Thayer 

Mr. and Mrs. John K Wallace. Jr 

Mrs. Mahlon B Wallace, Jr 

Watlow Electric Company 

Dr. Clarence S Weldon 

Dr. Virginia V Weldon 

Mr Thomas L. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. Don L. Wolfsberger 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Zorensky 

C. C. Johnson Spink 
President, Board of Trustees 

Mrs. Walter G. Stern, President, 
Executive Board of the Members 

Dr. Peter H. Raven 
Director 



SVJ Member of 

^5 The Arts and Education 

Fund of Greater St. Louis 

The MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN 
BULLETIN is published seven times a 
year, in February, April. May. June, 
August. October, and December by the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower 
Grove. St. Louis, Mo. 63110. Second 
Class postage paid at St. Louis. Mo. 
$12 00 per year. $15 foreign 

The Missouri Botanical Garden 

Bulletin is sent to every Member of the 
Garden as one of the benefits of their 
membership. For a contribution as 
little as $30 per year. Members also 
are entitled to: free admission to the 
Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitations to special 
events and receptions: announce- 
ments of all lectures and classes; dis- 
counts in the Garden shops and for 
course fees; and the opportunity to 
travel, domestic and abroad, with 
other Members. For information, 
please call 577-5100 

Postmaster: send address changes to 
P.O. Box 299. St. Louis, MO 63166 




Comment 

April 5, 1983, was perhaps the most impor- 
tant day in the history of the Missouri Bo- 
tanical Garden since Henry Shaw first 
opened the Garden to visitors in the sum- 
mer of 1859. 

The voters of St. Louis City and St. 
Louis County approved Proposition 4 on 
April 5th which establishes a Botanical 
Garden Subdistrict of the Zoo-Museum Dis- 
trict and which can provide an important new financial base for 
the Garden's operation. 

While we of the Garden are both pleased and gratified by 
this victory— one for which we have been working for five years 
—it is the people of the St. Louis community who can be most 
proud. Their foresight in providing this new support for the 
Garden and increased support for the Zoo, Art Museum, and 
Science Museum indicates that St. Louisians are vitally con- 
cerned about our community. The contribution the voters have 
made for the welfare of all of us will be manifested over the 
years to follow as the Garden and the other institutions con- 
tinue to grow and provide the high quality of recreation, educa- 
tion, and scientific services of which we are all capable. 

While the opening of the Garden can be credited primarily 
to the work of two men— Henry Shaw, who provided the idea 
and the capital for the founding of a botanical garden, and 
George Engelmann, who helped shape Henry Shaw's idea— 
the accomplishment of the creation of the Botanical Garden 
Subdistrict was possible only because of extraordinary effort of 
many people. 

We want to acknowledge the supreme effort of Mr. Robert 
Hyland, president of the Zoo's Board, who served as Campaign 
Chairman and brought to the Campaign his unique abilities and 
seemingly limitless energy as well as his enthusiasm and con- 
cern for the future of our community. Marlin and Carol Perkins, 
who so graciously acted as Honorary Co-Chairman, deserve 
heartfelt praise and gratitude, as does Charles Valier, the Cam- 
paign's Treasurer, whose invaluable work was essential to our 



success and which cannot adequately be mentioned in our 
limited space. We need, also, to recognize the tremendous 
efforts of the Presidents of the Boards of the four institutions. In 
addition to Mr. Hyland, they are John Peters MacCarthy for the 
Art Museum, Elwood L. Clary for the Science Museum, and 
C. C. Johnson Spink who is President of our own Board. 

We must acknowledge our Members and our volunteers who 
granted an enormous amount of their valuable time in all phases 
of the campaign to bring about this success. In addition, we, of 
course, want to recognize all of those members of our staff who 
worked alongside the volunteers and Members, often late into 
the evenings, so that the Subdistrict could become a reality. Indi- 
viduals made phone calls, spoke before groups, wrote letters, 
contacted organizations, and in all cases put forth extraordinary 
effort for the campaign. 

A major reason we were successful was the effort of those 
who volunteered their time for the telephoning. Our margins of 
victory in both the city and county were slim— about 2,600 votes 
in the city; 1,200 in the county (a margin of 0.6 percent in the 
county!) and this personal contact by phone undoubtedly was 
the difference between success and failure. On election day, the 
staff members and volunteers of the four institutions contacted 
30.000 favorable voters to urge them to go to the polls. 

Finally, we should recall that the groundwork— without which 
there would be no Botanical Garden Subdistrict— was laid in 
Jefferson City by William M. Klein (now Director of the Morris 
Arboretum in Philadelphia) and Rick Daley. This resulted in the 
passage, in 1981, of legislation— sponsored by State Senator 
John E. Scott and Representative Russell E. Egan— that gave 
us the permission to ask the voters in the city and county to 
establish this new subdistrict. 

The passage of the proposition and the establishment of the 
Botanical Garden Subdistrict mark the beginning of a new era 
for the Garden. Because of it, we shall continue to grow and to 
give to the people of our community the quality of service they 
have come to expect from one of the world's most outstanding 
botanical institutions. 



\JhJJU^ /r\jC 



Ouht^^y 



Botanical Garden Subdistrict Created 



On April 5, voters in St. Louis City and County approved a 
measure— Proposition 4— establishing a Botanical Garden 
Subdistrict of the eleven-year-old St. Louis Metropolitan Zoo- 
logical Park and Museum District. With the creation of the Sub- 
district, the Garden, which this summer enters its 125th year of 
service to the community, will be provided with a financial base 
of tax support. 

The measure approved by voters allows the Garden to 
benefit from a property tax of up to 4C per $100 assessed 
valuation. It is anticipated that the Garden could receive $2.6 
million annually. (Because the measure that created the Sub- 
district calls for the Garden to reduce its admission fees, the 
estimated net income from the tax is $1.25 million or about one- 
fourth of the Garden's annual operating budget.) 

According to the procedures set-up for the operation of the 
Subdistrict, the Garden will present each year a budget to the 
ten-member commission that governs the Subdistrict. The 
commissioners will recommend a tax-rate up to the maximum 
of 4C per $100 assessed valuation to the Zoo-Museum District 
Board. (This is the same procedure followed by the Zoo, Art 
Museum, and Museum of Science and Natural History, the 
other three institutions covered by the ZMD.) Based upon 
these recommendations, the District Board will set the rate. 



The new Botanical Garden Subdistrict of the Zoo-Museum 
District created by the voters on April 5, 1983, is governed by a 
ten-member commission. County Executive Gene McNary has 
appointed Mrs. David C. Farrell, Mrs. James S. McDonnell, Mr. 
Robert M. Sunnen, Mr. George H. Walker III, Mr. Frederick S. 
Wood, as commissioners from St. Louis County and Mayor 
Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr. has appointed Mrs. Harry J. Ben- 
nett, Ms. Doris Moore-Glenn, Mrs. W. Lynton Edwards III, Mrs. 
William Kieffer, and Ms. Marjorie M. Weir, as the five com- 
missioners from the City of St. Louis. (An article in the next 
Bulletin will feature these commissioners.) 

C. C. Johnson Spink, President of the Garden's Board of 
Trustees, hailed the appointments, "The Mayor and County 
Executive have selected a truly outstanding group of indi- 
viduals to serve on the new Botanical Garden Subdistrict Com- 
mission. These men and women are respected throughout the 
community for their commitment to civic affairs. We look 
forward to working with them." 

The Garden's 26-member Board of Trustees will not be 
affected by the appointments and will continue in its capacity 
as the governing body of the Missouri Botanical Garden. 



(continued on page 7 1) 

3 



<< 



New" Plant Takes Off 



Despite its name, the winged bean cannot fly. But that 
appears about all it is unable to do. 

A member of the legume (pea) family (see related article), 
and classified by scientists as Psophocarpus tetragonolobus, 
the winged bean was almost completely unknown eight years 
ago, even though it was described by Carl Linnaeus as long 
ago as 1763. But, as this is written, there is a flurry of excite- 
ment and optimistic prophecy about the plant, which has been 
called in the popular press, "supermarket on a stalk." In a New 
York Times article last year, reporter Jane E. Brody wrote, "it 
promises to become the soybean of the tropics, where it alone 
may do more than any combination of foods to counter mal- 
nutrition." 

The soybean— as midwestern Americans can appreciate, 
driving, as they do, past mile after mile of soybean fields— is 
the most economically important legume and one of the 
world's most important crops in general. In 1982, American 
farmers produced 72 million acres of soy. The winged bean has 
been compared to soy because of its economic and nutritional 
value and also because of its growth potential. Soy has risen 
from obscurity to being regarded as one of the world's major 
protein sources in less than 60 years. 

As for the winged bean, scientists and journalists are doing 
almost everything they can to call attention to the plant. 
Reports are: 

• Its seeds contain about 37% protein, approximately the 
protein content of the soybean. 

• Its seeds are also 18% oil that is high in vitamin E. When 



Legumes 



One of the most important plant families, the Leguminosae 
(pea family) is also one of the largest, ranking third in size 
behind the orchid and sunflower families. It is second only to 
the cereals (grasses) as a source of food for humans, being 
extremely rich in proteins— containing two to three times the 
protein of cereal. Legumes also contain certain amino acids 
which complement those found in cereals; a mixture of 
legumes and cereals can produce a properly balanced diet. 

In addition to being a major food source, legumes also pro- 



A Miracle Ornament of Cure 

Miracles turn up in the 
least likely times and 
places; that in fact is the 
nature of them: something 
expected cannot be a mir- 
acle. Take the case of the 
small, pleasant Madagas- 
car periwinkle, for ex- 
ample. 

The Madagascar peri- 
winkle is a pretty flower, 
with its sometimes rose- 
pink, sometimes white 
petals. Gardeners like it 
because it's relatively easy to grow. But there is more— much 
more— to it than its aesthetic qualities. 

Scientists have found that this attractive flower is the 
source of some 75 alkaloids (plant produced nitrogen com- 
pounds which can affect animal— including human-phys- 
iology). Two of these alkaloids— vincaleukoblastine (also called 
4 




the oil is pressed from the beans, a high-protein "flour" is left 
behind, suitable for breads or cereals. 

• Its tuberous roots, resembling potatoes, are 24% pro- 
tein; compare this to 2% for potatoes and sweet potatoes. 

• The leaves of the winged bean resemble spinach both in 
taste and nutritional value. 

• Even its flowers are edible; when sauted they are sim- 
ilar to mushrooms. 

• Its stems have been compared to asparagus. 

The only negative characteristic pointed out by writers is 
that, because it is a vine (it is a perennial that grows to 9-12 
feet), the winged bean must be staked, which is a costly 
process and inhibits its production over large acreages. But 
with the large scale agricultural experimentation now being 
conducted in 50 countries, the hope is that genetically short 
varieties will be found. 

Perhaps as amazing as the many benefits the plant offers is 
that its protein value has been recognized since 1929, but the 
winged bean was ignored for almost half a century— until 1975, 
it was neglected everywhere except in Papua New Guinea and 
Southeast Asia; even there it was considered a poor man's 
crop and received little research attention. But in 1975, the 
United States National Academy of Science published a study 
of P. tetragonolobus, pointing out its merits and urging its 
development. 

If you are interested in seeing specimens of the winged 
bean, it will be grown in the Demonstration Vegetable Garden 
this summer and will be at its peak in July. 



vide timber trees, dyes and tannins, gums and resins, oil, med- 
icines and insecticides. Many also have ornamental value. 

The family is found throughout the world, from moist trop- 
ical regions to deserts to temperate regions. 

Important members of the family include (aside from the 
pea, soy, and winged bean) the peanut, lentil, licorice, and 
bean (for food); alfalfa and clover (for fodder); and broom, 
locust, redbud, wisteria, and Kentucky coffee tree (for orna- 
ment). 



Madagascar, an island country off the southeastern coast of the African 
continent, is 226,658 square miles— just over three times the size of 
Missouri. It is one of the most biologically interesting areas of the world- 
more than 12, 000 species of plants occur in this small nation (half of these 
are found nowhere else in the world) while only about 30.000 species 
occur in all of tropical Africa. (About 1,900 species occur in Missouri.) 

Unfortunately, the island is— biologically —one of the most threatened 
areas on earth— only about 10 million acres (or 7% of the total area) remain 
in natural vegetation. Garden botanists anticipate that it is unlikely there 
will be any significant opportunities to study Madagascar's natural veg- 
etation after this current decade. 

Plants with the potential to be as valuable as the Madagascar peri- 
winkle could be lost forever. 

Because of this, the Missouri Botanical Garden has begun several 
projects to study the flora of Madagascar. Articles about these projects 
will appear in future issues of the Bulletin. 



vinblastine— VLB) and leurocristine (vincristine— VCR) have 
shown remarkable effects in the treatment of leukemia and 
Hodgkin's disease. 

The two alkaloids have been, in fact, called miracle drugs 
since they are now used so successfully and so widely even 
though they have only been known in the last quarter century. 

(continued on page 1 1) 



Gardening in St. Louis 




Grass in Shady Areas 

Probably one of the most frequently asked lawn questions I 
encounter is "How can I get grass to grow in a shady spot?" 
Sometimes, unfortunately, the answer is to forget about trying 
to grow grass in a very shady area. You will have much more 
success if you plant a shade-tolerant ground cover such as 
Pachysandra (spurge), Vinca minor (myrtle) or Ophiopogon 
(dwarf mondo grass). Ophiopogon is a beautiful ground cover 
which is found throughout the Garden, but is especially prev- 
alent in the Japanese Garden. In addition to having attractive, 
dark-green glossy foliage during the summer, it has a pale 
purple flower spike in late summer. If you have a spot that is in 
dense shade, such as under large conifers, it is probably best 
to mulch this area with shredded or chunk bark or crushed 
stones, and not to plant anything. 

Grass requires a minimum of three to four hours of direct 
sunlight daily or all-day filtered sunlight such as might be pro- 
vided by large oaks or maples. If you can provide this basic 
light requirement, here are some other guidelines from lawn 
experts at O. M. Scott and Sons to help improve the grass 
growth in shady areas: 

—Prune or thin tree branches to improve light and circula- 
tion of air. 

—Sow grass seed in the spring before the tree leaves 
appear. 

—Use a seed mixture of grasses that grow best in re- 
stricted sunlight. 

—Use a fertilizer at seeding time designated to give new 
seedlings a boost. This is usually a high phosphorus fertilizer. 
(Phosphorus is the middle number on the fertilizer bag.) 

—Fertilize in early spring or late fall when leaves are off the 
trees. 

—Water and feed more under the drip lines of the trees, to 
compensate for the competition of tree roots. 

—Mow grass in shaded areas a half-inch longer to increase 
blade surface area to "catch" more sunlight. 

—Consider applying a lawn disease preventer in spring 
and fall, since turf diseases are more active in moist and 
shaded areas. 

—Remove tree leaves in early spring and fall to keep them 
from smothering the grass. 




Mole Control 

Moles can be aggravating pests in your lawn and garden. 
Many different control methods are used. Some people try 
various techniques of killing these creatures by using spring 
traps, by gassing their runways with exhaust fumes from the 
lawn mower or pellets, or by flooding the moles out by sticking 
a water hose into their burrow. Some people also repel these 
creatures by placing moth balls in their runways. Probably the 
best long-term control is to eliminate their food source— grubs 
and other lawn insects. You can do this by using chemical or 
biological controls. 

Spectracide (Diazinon) is probably the most commonly 
used chemical control. This material should be applied in early 
to mid-August. Most people prefer to use the granular form of 
this chemical; it can be put on with a lawn spreader. It is most 
important that this chemical be watered in thoroughly (apply at 



SHOVEL, HOE, RADIO 

Steve Frowine, Public Horticulture Specialist, will 
appear on KMOX-AM (1120 on the dial) as follows: 

Friday — June 3 Major Topic: Roses 

3-4 p.m. 

Saturday— June 18 Major Topic: Container Garden 

2-3 p.m. 

Thursday— July 7 Major Topic: Summer House 

2-3 p.m. Plant Care 

Saturday— July 16 Major Topic: Summer Gardening 

1-2 p.m. 

Rosarian Dave Vismara will appear on KFUO-AM's 
"How Does Your Garden Grow" on Thursday, June 16, 
from 9:30-10:00 a.m. KFUO-AM is 850 on the dial. 



one-half inch of water) after application to insure that it pene- 
trates the soil to a level where the grubs are feeding. 

You can apply to your lawn a biological control material 
called Milky Spore Disease which contains the spores of a 
couple of different bacteria that infect and eventually kill Jap- 
anese beetle larvae (grubs) and many other species of beetles. 
You must be patient when using this material, however, since it 
usually takes one to three years for effective control with Milky 
Spore Disease. 




Yellow Jackets 

Because of our very mild weather, yellow jackets will be in 
great abundance this summer. These bothersome wasps are 
frequently confused with honeybees. They seem to materialize 
out of nowhere to annoy us while we are gardening, mowing 
our grass, or enjoying a picnic. Their nests are located several 
inches underground. If you can locate this nest, you can apply 
Sevin or Diazinon to the soil around the nest for control. 



QQ 



Blossom-End Rot on Tomatoes 

If the bottom centers of your tomatoes are turning black, 
your plants have a very common physiological problem called 
"blossom-end rot." This problem shows up when we have hot, 
dry weather. To prevent it, you should make sure your plants 
get adequate moisture. You can do this by applying a heavy, 
three to five inch layer of organic mulch such as straw or 
compost, and by making sure that your plants receive at least 
one inch of water per week. If blossom-end rot has been a re- 
curring problem in your garden despite efforts to keep the 
plants well-watered, it may be advisable for you to add some 
calcium in the form of ground limestone to your garden next 
year. 

—Steven A. Frowine, Public Horticulture Specialist 

5 



A Garden Party with Bobby Short 



Joan Dames, writing in the St. Louis 
Post-Dispatch, called it, "An elegant 
party." Indeed. 

Almost 350 people attended the Gar- 
den's first benefit since 1976 on April 23. 
Featuring the music of Bobby Short- 
called by many the premiere cabaret 
performer in America — and some cul- 
inary magic by the Omelet Man, Rudy 
Stanish, the benefit was planned by a 
committee chaired by Mrs. Robert R. 
Hermann, Mrs. Warren M. Shapleigh, 
and Mrs. Walter G. Stern. The corporate 
sponsor for the event was Stix, Baer and 
Fuller Co., who also provided the dec- 
orations. 

Benefactors of the Garden Party in- 
cluded Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ruwitch, 
Mr. and Mrs. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr., 
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald D. Wren. 

Patrons were Mr. and Mrs. Whitney 
R. Harris, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley N. Hol- 
lander, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Friedman, 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald O. Schnuck, Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles G. Schott, Jr., Dr. and 
Mrs. Donald Ross, Mr. and Mrs. Orrin S. 
Wightman, III, Mrs. G. S. Kieffer, Field- 
ing Lewis Holmes, Mrs. Herman T. Pott, 
Mrs. Hermann F. Spoehrer, and Mrs. 
Robert West, and Mr. Alan E. Doede. 




rr» • 1 1 Bobby Short 

Iranquillo c 

— - J - €? ~+~ 




At the Benefit, left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Don Williams of Dallas, Mr. Robert Kresko (a 
member of the Garden's Board of Trustees), Mrs. Tommy Farnsworth of Memphis, 
Mrs. Robert Kresko, and Mr Tommy Farnsworth 




With Bobby Short are the Benefit Committee Co-Chairmen, Mrs. Warren M. Shapleigh, 
Mrs. Robert R Hermann, and Mrs. Walter G. Stern. 



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121 




Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg. Jr. , Ms. Betty Howe, 
and Mr. C. C. Johnson Spink at the Benefit. Mr. 
Shoenberg is a Garden Trustee; Mr. Spink, Pres- 
ident of the Trustees. 




Arriving are, left to right, Mr. and Mrs. Don Ray and Mr. Paul 
Cavalli Mr. Ray is President of Stix, Baer, and Fuller; 
Mr. Cavalli, Vice-President. Stix was the corporate sponsor 
of the Benefit. 




Serving one of his world-famous 
omelets to Bobby Short is culinary 
magician Rudolph Stanish. 



One of the souvenirs of the Garden Party was a cookbook of 
omelet recipes, Omelets, Crepes, and other Recipes for the 
Missouri Botanical Garden by Rudolph Stanish. It's now avail- 
able, along with Rudolph Stanish's custom designed omelet 
pan, in the Garden Gate Shop. Here's a sample from the book: 



MOUSSELINE OMELET 

(A sweet for two) 

3 eggs 

1 tablespoon butter 
3 tablespoons sugar 
3 tablespoons preserve 

Separate the eggs. Beat the whites with 1 tablespoon of sugar 
till glossy and stiff. Using the same beater, beat the yolks with 
the remaining sugar till creamy and lemon colored. Combine 
both of these mixtures. 

In hot omelet pan melt 1 tablespoon butter and pour in mix- 
ture. Spread over the entire surface of pan and when sides are 
brown, hold under the broiler to brown and set. Only takes one 
minute. 

Spoon the apricot preserve close to the handle. With a 
spatula, fold over (rather than roll) onto a hot oval dish. Dust 
with confectioners' sugar and eat hot. May be flamed with 3 
tablespoons of Irish Mist. 



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Come To The 
Japanese Festival 

Plan to take part in a workshop or a spe- 
cial event designed just for children. 

• Fold and re-fold paper to create an 
origami creature. 

• Listen to the fairy tales told to Jap- 
anese children. 

• Make a kite and try to fly it. 

• Learn to arrange flowers and 
branches in a traditional way. 

• Watch a selection of children's 
films about Japan. 

The workshops will be limited to the 
first 40 students ages 8 to 12 who arrive 
at the Beaumont Room. Workshops will 
begin at 1 p.m. For more information 
and a schedule of events call: 577-5181 
after June 6. 




FOR ^ 



MEMBERS 









: ; 












Want To Learn More? 

Join us for A Touch of Japan. Ten to 
twelve year olds who take part in the pro- 
gram will spend a week exploring the 
customs, people, and gardens of Japan. 
Using the 14-acre Japanese Garden as 
inspiration, participants will write haiku, 
design flower arrangements in the Jap- 
anese style, make dry gardens, and ex- 
perience other aspects of this unique 
culture. Bring your own bag lunch; ev- 



Treasures To Discover 

ANNOUNCING . . . that something spe- 
cial has been created for children who 
visit Shaw's Garden! A new "Discovery 
Map of the Missouri Botanical Garden," 
available at both the ticket counter and 
the Garden Gate Shop, is filled with trea- 
sures to find along each Garden path- 
way. One side of the map includes draw- 
ings and quotes from children who have 
visited the garden, while the other side 
lists suggestions for fun ways to use the 
map. Be sure to ask about the "Dis- 
covery Map of the Missouri Botanical 
Garden" next time you visit! 

erything else is provided. 

One 5-day session: August 1 through 
August 5, 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Ridg- 
way Center. 

Fee: Members $38.00, Non-mem- 
bers $42.00. 

For registration and more informa- 
tion dn this and other summer programs 
check The Summerscape Press or call 
577-5140. 



Water, Water Everywhere! 

A visitor to the Japanese Garden cannot help but notice the sights and sounds of 
water. The movement of water as it cascades, trickles, or ripples often has a sooth- 
ing effect on the observer. Young children can learn a great deal about the prop- 
erties of water by playing with it. Try working with water in two of its forms: liquid and 
solid. 

You will need: Old rubber boot, rubber glove, children's clay molds, cookie 
molds, a cone-shaped paper cup, or other objects that can be filled and frozen; sink 
filled with water; rubber band; salt. 

What to do: Experiment with water in its liquid state by filling several of the con- 
tainers listed above with water. Will a water-filled rubber boot float in a sink filled with 
water? What happens to the shape of the rubber glove if extra water is forced into its 
"fingers"? Pour water from one container into another. Does the water "fit"? 

Place the water-filled boot into a freezer. Use a rubber band to close the open 
end of the rubber glove, and place the water-filled glove into the freezer. Since water 
expands when it freezes, be sure to leave some empty space at the top of each con- 
tainer. 

Place as many other filled containers into the freezer as space will allow. The 
next day, remove the frozen containers from the freezer. Run warm water over the 
ice molds to release the frozen shapes. Fill a sink with water and test whether or not 
the ice shapes can float. 

Observe the melting process for a few minutes. How does the shape of ice 
change during melting? Sprinkle some salt on the ice shapes. What does this do to 
the melting process? 

Talk with your child about how both of you were able to change the shape of 
water by pouring, freezing, and melting. Make yourselves a frozen treat by pouring 
liquid fruit juice into your favorite ice mold! 
8 



Did You Know 

In Japan, families do not celebrate Moth- 
er's Day or Father's Day. Instead two 
children's days are celebrated. The 
Boys' Festival was originally a Chinese 
festival to ward off sickness during the 
rainy season. After the festival was intro- 
duced to Japan, it came to be regarded 
as a festival for boys. Families with boys 
flew carp streamers over their homes in 
honor of boy children. The carp symbol- 
ized strength and endurance, character- 
istics that the Japanese wanted for their 
sons. The Doll Festival or Peach Fes- 
tival is for girls. Originally it was part of a 
purification ritual. Small paper or wood- 
en dolls, set adrift on rivers or the sea, 
were believed to carry away troubles. 
Today the festival has been changed 
into a display of dolls on special tiered 
stands decorated with peach blossoms. 

Word Search 

There are 15 objects found in a Jap- 
anese garden hidden in this puzzle. How 
many can you find? Look up, down, 
across, and diagonally. 



I 


T 


E 


A 


H 


O 


U 


S 


E 


S 


s 


A 


N 


D 


O 


N 


M 


w 


L 


N 


L 


O 


T 


U 


S 


A 


S 


A 


N 


O 


A 


A 


R 


c 


B 


T 


E 


T 


E 


W 


N 


C 


K 





M 


U 


E 


E 


D 


L 


D 


A 


N 


E 


I 


R 


R 


R 


R 


A 


B 


R 


I 


D 


G 


E 


T 


F 


A 


N 


R 


P 


I 


D 


Y 


S 


M 


A 


G 


T 


E 


O 


T 


P 


O 


C 


U 


L 


Y 


E 


R 


A 


C 


O 


P 


H 


L 


L 


R 


R 


N 


T 


L 


K 


E 


L 


P 


A 


D 


N 


E 


R 


N 


E 


S 


Y 


E 


Y 


A 


R 


w 


A 


T 


E 


R 


B 


A 


S 


I 


N 



BRIDGE 


RIPPLE 


CARP 


ROCKS 


DRY GARDEN 


SAND 


ISLAND 


SNOW LANTERN 


LAKE 


TEA HOUSE 


LOTUS 


WATER BASIN 


NATURE 


WATERFALL 


PLUM TREE 






— 'Til next issue. 




The Education Department 



CALENDAR 

When you plan your summer, think about us: 



June 



July 



In the musical, June was busting out all over In the Garden, it's doing the 
same. The roses will be (as always) first class (remember, the Anne L. 
Lehmann Rose Garden is the 1983 Rose Garden of the Year for the A.A.R.S.) 
and the events will be the same. Consider this schedule: 

JUNE 1-4 



June 1: 



June 2: 



June 4: 



JUNE 5-11 



Continuing: 
June 9: 
JUNE 12-18 



Continuing: 
June 18: 



JUNE 19-25 



Continuing: 



JUNE 26-30 



Continuing: 



Haiku Exhibit, Climatron (through June 30). A month 

of plants interpreted through haiku written by area 

students. 

Purple Martin Day, Ridgway Center and Grounds, 

6:30 p.m., a celebration of the wonderfully acrobatic 

bird that does us a great service: each purple martin 

consumes somewhere around 2,000 mosquitoes a 

day. 

Disney Cartoon Festival, Shoenberg Auditorium, 

noon. What's a childhood without Disney (even if the 

childhood extends into the 30s or 60s or 90s)? $1 for 

Members; $1 .50 for Others. 

Haiku Exhibit 

Rose Evening (see enclosed invitation) 

Haiku Exhibit 

Japanese Festival, Garden Grounds. It's become 
one of the high points of being in St. Louis in June. 
Through June 26. 

Bonsai Exhibit, Floral Display Hall. Come see one of 
the most fascinating arts on earth. (Also through the 
26th.) 

Ibekana Society Show, Floral Display Hall. The So- 
ciety members do amazing things with flowers; try to 
arrange your schedule to see this exhibit. (Okay, the 
joke is obvious. But the art of ikebana is subtle.) 
(Again, through the 26th.) 

- ? 
Japanese Festival 

Bonsai Exhibit \, 

Ikebana Society Show 

Haiku Exhibit 



Japanese Festival (ends June 26) 
Bonsai Exhibit (ends June 26) 
Ikebana Society Show (ends June 26) 
Haiku Exhibit (ends June 30) 



All together: Happy Birthday to you; Happy birth . . there are two birth- 
days this month. Henry Shaw's number 183; the Ridgway Center's 1st. 
Come celebrate with us. 



JULY 1-9 



July 1: 



July 9: 



JULY 10-16 



Continuing: 
JULY 17-23 



Continuing: 
July 17: 

July 22-24: 



JULY 24-31 



Continuing: 
July 24: 



Cycad Exhibit, Climatron (entire month). Cycads are 

some of the most primitive plants still around— they go 

back to the Mesozoic era— and were contemporary 

with the dinosaurs. 

Incredible Journey Shoenberg Auditorium. Noon. 

Another great Disney flick. $1 for Members; $1.50 for 

others. 



Cycad Exhibit 

Cycad Exhibit 

Ridgway Center Anniversary. Ridgway Center Can 
it really be a year already? Yes, it is. Come celebrate it. 
Midsummer Night Movies. Shoenberg Auditorium. 
Come dance your cares away (or come even if you 
have no cares) with Fred and Ginger. Astaire and 
Rogers, that is, in Top Hat and Shall We Dance? At 
7:30 on 7/22-23, with a 2 p.m. matinee on 7/24. $2 for 
Members; $2.50 for others. 



Cycad Exhibit (ends July 31) 

Henry Shaw's Birthday, Ridgway Center and 
Grounds. The Garden's founder's 183rd birthday 
party features clowns and cake. Come one and all. 




Classes 



Even though it's summer, classes are still in session at the Garden. A few 
notes about the listings below: 1.) Those marked with ' are for adults; all 
others are for children. 2.) Class listings for children include age range for 
specific classes: ranges in parentheses after class title. 3.) Date listed in 
margin is date of first class meeting 4.) Want information about registering or 
want a course brochure for details? Call the Education Department at 
577-5140. 5.) All classes meet at the Garden except those marked with (A); 
these are held at the Arboretum. 



June 4 

June 5 
June 10 
June 11 

June 13 

June 20 
June 25 
June 27 



*Cahokia Mounds (Family) 9 a.m. -3 p.m. 

'Summer Rose Care 9 a.m. -noon 

Biological Communities 2-4 p.m. 

Evening Hike (A) (Family) 8-10:30 p.m. 

*Pest and Weed Control 9-11 a.m. 

A Fish Named Carp (4-6) 10:30 a.m. -noon 

Creating with Clay (7-12) (Five meetings) 

11:30 a.m. 

ECO-Reach (8-14) (Two weeks) 8:45 a.m. -noon 

"Idea Gardens 9 a.m. -2 p. m. 

Pencil Sketching (10-12) (Five meetings) 9:30- 

11:30 a.m. 



9:30- 



June 28 

July 8 
July 9 
July 11 

July 12 

July 13 
July 16 

July 20 

July 23 
July 25 

July 27 



Sense of Wonder (A) (7-10) (Five days, including 
overnights) 

Evening Hike (A) (Family) 8-10:30 p.m. 
Festival Day (4-6) 10:30 a.m. -noon 
Multi-Media Arts (7-12) (Five meetings) 9:30- 
11:30 a.m. 

Happy Trails (A) (10-13) (Five days, including over- 
nights) 

Energy, Food, and You (10-12) 10:30 am -2 p.m. 
•Maintenance and Late Planning 9-11 a.m. 
My Own Rock (4-6) I0:30-noon 
Parsley, Sage, Rosemary, and Thyme (10-12) 
10:30 a.m. -2 p.m. 

Water, Wet or Dry (4-6) 1030-noon 
Painting with Acrylics (12-15) (Five meetings) 
9:30-11:30 

Pollen, Petals, and Petunias (10-12) 10:30 a.m.- 
2 p.m. 9 



Places to see . . . 

An adjunct to the already popular hardy rock garden out- 
side the Mediterranean House was recently installed. Given in 
memory of Audrey Heckman by her husband, Mr. William Guy 
Heckman, and their children, the garden— on the north side of 
the Climatron and along the path leading to the Mediterranean 
House— contains plants suitable for rock gardens in the St. 
Louis area including species of tulips and narcissus, centaurea, 
Spanish bluebell, angel's tears, and grape hyacinth; many are 
native to Mediterranean regions. The original hardy rock gar- 
den outside the Mediterranean House is being enhanced also 
in memory of Mrs. Heckman, made possible through the gen- 
erosity of Mrs. Heckman's mother, Mrs. Arnold Stifel 





The Scented Garden looked so spectacular, we wanted to 
bring you a picture of it. Located just north of the Hosta Garden 
along the Garden's east wall, the Scented Garden was de- 
signed to allow visitors the chance to experience nature 
through senses other than sight— including smell, taste, and 
touch. It was made possible through the generosity of Isabelle 
Lowis Zimmerman as a gift in memory of her grandmother, 
Susannah F. Mack, and her mother, Lilliam C. Lowis 



10 





The Strauch (Angel) Fountain 



Latzer Fountain 



Subdistrict 

(continued from page 3) 

There will be some changes at the 
Garden with the passage of Proposition 
4. Most importantly, the admission rate 
will be reduced once the Subdistrict is 
fully established. Children 12 and under 
will be admitted free, as will people aged 
65 and above. Admission — for adults 
(17-65)— will be $1 and $.50 for children 
13-16. On Wednesday, Thursday, and 
Saturday mornings, the Garden will be 
free to visitors. Income in 1983 from the 
new tax is anticipated to offset loss 
of revenue due to reduced admission 
prices. The first real increase in revenue 
to the Garden will come in 1984. 

The Zoo-Museum District was cre- 
ated in 1972 when City and County 
voters approved a property tax of 9$ per 
$100 assessed valuation for the support 
of the Zoo, the Art Museum, and the 
Museum of Science and Natural History. 
In the April 5 election, in addition to 
approving tax support for the Garden, 
voters also approved increased support 
for each of the three original members of 
the District. 



Ornament of Cure 

(continued from page 4) 

Vinblastine has been shown to be 
tremendously effective against Hodg- 
kin's disease; vincristine especially 
against acute childhood leukemia. In 
specific programs of treatment, vinblas- 
tine can lead to total remission in close 
to 80% of patients with Hodgkin's dis- 
ease, while vincristine, in combination 
with certain other drugs (including 
steroids) can bring about total remission 
in more than 90% of children suffering 
from certain types of leukemia. 

These results are probably enough 
in themselves to qualify the Madagascar 
periwinkle as a miracle plant. But the 
story is more involved yet — a paradigm 
that important discoveries are still some- 
times made by chance. 

In the late 1950s, researchers at a 
Canadian university were investigating 
the use of the Madagascar periwinkle in 
the treatment for diabetes as part of a 
wider project in which they were at- 
tempting to discern the medical validity 
of certain folk cures. This periwinkle had 
been cited in certain folk medicine tra- 



ditions as a treatment for diabetes. 

While they were unable to clinically 
confirm the plant's use against diabe- 
tes, they observed that extracts of the 
plant drastically reduced the number of 
white blood cells and depressed bone 
marrow activity in rats. Since leukemia 
originates in body tissues including bone 
marrow and is usually manifested by ex- 
tremely high white blood cell counts, the 
scientists were led to explore the Mad- 
agascar periwinkle as a source for a 
treatment of the disease. 

The Madagascar periwinkle (Cath- 
aranthus roseus and sometimes called 
Vinca rosea) will be on display on the 
Spoehrer Plaza this summer with inter- 
pretive signs. A member of the dogbane 
family and related to rauwolfia (from 
which comes reserpine, an alkaloid 
used to treat hypertension), C. roseus is 
naturally a tropical perennial but can be 
cultivated as an annual in temperate re- 
gions. As its common name implies, it is 
native to Madagasar. 



Notes from the Garden 



New Members, Officers for Members' Board 



At its May meeting, the Executive 
Board of the Members installed Mrs. 
Walter G. Stern as its President; she 
also served as President from 1969- 
1972, and from 1977-79. She succeeds 
Mrs. Shadrach F. Morris, Jr., who was 
President since May, 1981 . 

Also installed as officers were Mrs. 
Rudyard K. Rapp (First Vice President), 
Mrs. Pedrick Conway (Second Vice 
President), Mrs. Charles Cook (Trea- 
surer) and Mrs. Bruce K. Yoder (Secre- 
tary). 

The Board also appointed 14 new 
members: Ms. Elaine Alexander, Mrs. 
Walter F. Ballinger, Mr. William Adair 
Bernoudy, Mr. J. J. Landers Carnal, Mr. 
William Frank, Mr. W. Ashley Gray III, 
Mr. George Hasegawa, Mr. Jack Jen- 
nings, Mrs. James S. McDonnell, Mrs. 
Sewell A. McMillan, Mr. David Murray, 
Mr. Tom Schlafly, Mr. Don Wolfsberger, 
Mrs. Andrew Zinsmeyer, and Mrs. Louis 
I. Zorensky. 

The new board members will serve a 
three-year term and will be involved in 
various aspects of the Garden's Mem- 
bership program. 

We wish to thank Mrs. Shadrach F. 
Morris, Jr., the Past President of the 
Board, and her officers, Mrs. Bernard 
Brinker (Second Vice President), Mrs. 
Walter F. Stern (First Vice President), 
Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp (Secretary) and 
Mrs. Charles Schott (Treasurer) for their 
dedication and service. 

—Patricia R. Arnold, Membership Services 




Executive Board Officers are (I. to r.) Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp, 1st Vice President; Mrs. Charles Cook, 
Treasurer; Mrs. Walter G. Stern, President; Mrs. Bruce R. Yoder, Secretary; and Mrs. Pedrick Conway, 
2nd Vice President 

Peter H. Raven, Director of the Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden, has been unan- 
imously elected a director of the World 
Wildlife Fund-U.S., the United States 
affiliate of the international World Wild- 
life Fund. 

The WWF-U.S. is the nation's larg- 
est non-profit, private organization mak- 
ing conservation grants. It is one of 24 
affiliates of the international organiza- 
tion. Since the WWF was established in 
1961, the fund has made grants totalling 
more than $65 million for some 3,000 
scientific research, education, and hab- 
itat and wildlife preservation projects in 
more than 130 countries 




Mrs. Shadrach F Morris. Jr. . receives a gift from William 
R. Orthwein, Jr., First Vice President of the Garden's 
Board of Trustees Mrs. Morris was honored at the 
Board's April meeting for her service as President of the 
Executive Board of the Members 



Garden Honor Honored 

Annually since 1980, the Garden has 
honored individuals for their achieve- 
ments in landscape design or for work 
leading to the improvement of urban en- 
vironments with the Albert P. and 
Blanche Y. Greensfelder Medal. Now 
the Garden is being honored for the 
award itself. 

The Greensfelder Medal, designed 
by artist Karen Krager, was selected as 
one of less than 70 medals to represent 
the United States in the XIX International 
Medallic Exhibition in Florence, Italy, 
this fall. The exhibition is sponsored by 
the Federation Internationale de la 
Medaille (FIDEM), the most important 
organization of medalists in the world. 

Approximately 1,000 medals de- 
signed by American artists were consid- 
ered for inclusion in the exhibition, 
called by John Cook— Professor of Art at 
12 



Pennsylvania State University and the 
official U.S. delegate for FIDEM— the 
most prestigious exhibition of medals in 
the world. 

The first exhibition was held in 1937 
in Paris; exhibitions have been held 
every two years since then in major 
European cities. Cook estimated that 
2,000 medals created by artists from 
around the world would be shown in the 
exhibition. 



awarded to Wayne C. Kennedy, August 
A. Busch, Jr., Leonard Hall, and, most 
recently, to Roberto Burle Marx. (An 
article about the award to Mr. Burle Marx 
and the address he delivered in conjunc- 
tion with the award will appear in the 
next issue of the Bulletin.) 




Established in 1980 through the 
Albert P. and Blanche Y. Greensfelder 
Fund, the Greensfelder Medal has been 




Mrs. David J. (Patty) Lehleitner, one of the Gar- 
den's 500 indispensible volunteers. Mrs. Lehleit- 
ner has given more than 2, 000 hours working in 
the Director's office since 1976. 



New Caledonia, Cameroon, 

New Caledonia and Cameroon are 
thousands of miles apart, each touched 
by a different ocean: tiny New Cal- 
edonia, an island in the Pacific; Cam- 
eroon, on the African South Atlantic 
Coast. But the two places are connected 
in St. Louis by two organizations: the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, which con- 
ducts research in both areas, and the 
Harry and Flora D. Freund Memorial 
Foundation, which helps to support the 
research. 

In July, 1978, the Freund Foundation 
began supporting the work of Dr. Gordon 
D. McPherson, a Garden botanist who 
resides and works full-time on the island 
of New Caledonia. McPherson collects 
plant specimens and conducts field 
studies there, providing the Garden and 
other botanical institutions with ex- 
amples of some of the world's rarest 
plants. New Caledonia was, 80 million 
years ago, a part of Australia. Since 



St. Louis 

then it has broken away from the conti- 
nent and drifted northeastward. When it 
broke away, it carried with it many prim- 
itive plants now found nowhere outside 
of the island's 7,400 square miles. In 
effect, McPherson's work, which was 
supported by the Freund Foundation be- 
ginning 5 years ago, is carried out on a 
living museum of unique scientific im- 
portance. 

Earlier this year, the Foundation 
began supporting a second Garden re- 
search project — the work now conduct- 
ed by Dr. Duncan W. Thomas in Cam- 
eroon. Thomas is conducting field 
studies in forests in the southwestern 
part of the country; these forests have 
been identified as the most species-rich 
in all of Africa. (Thomas' work was re- 
ported in the April Bulletin.) 

Because of economic pressures in 
both New Caledonia (it is being strip- 
mined for its rich nickel deposits) and 




Ann Niederlander (r). wife of the late Donald Neider- 
lander, at the dedication of the collection 

Part of the Garden library's exten- 
sive holdings — the collection of material 
pertaining to book preservation and res- 
toration and the history of printing and 
book making — was dedicated as the 
Donald R. Neiderlander Memorial Col- 
lection recently and was made possible 
by the generosity of the late Mr. Neider- 
lander's family. 

Mr. Neiderlander served as a volun- 
teer in the library's bindery for ten years 
and was responsible for restoring many 
of the Garden's rare and fragile books. 

The Garden has the only institutional 
book preservation department in the 
state of Missouri 



This bookplate will appear in 
all of the several hundred 
books and pamphlets in the 
Neiderlander collection. 



MISSOURI 
BOTANICAL & 




Cameroon (its timber is being cut), the 
natural areas are disappearing rapidly, 
making the work of Drs. Thomas and 
McPherson even more vital and urgent. 

Explaining the Foundation's interest 
in and support of these projects, Mr. 
S. E. Freund, President and Treasurer, 
said, "I've had a fondness for the Gar- 
den for a long time. When the New Cal- 
edonia project was proposed five years 
ago, we felt it was an area in which little 
had been done and in which much could 
be accomplished. The Cameroon proj- 
ect was interesting for the same rea- 
sons." 

The Harry and Flora D. Freund Me- 
morial Foundation was established in 
1953 in memory of Mr. Freund's father, 
who died in 1949. It supports research in 
medicine, education, and social ser- 
vices, in addition to the Garden's botan- 
ical research. 



The Garden and St. Louis lost one 
of its best friends on April 13 when 
Morton D. May died. Known to many 
as Buster May, he was a major force 
behind the cultural vitality of the com- 
munity; his commitment to a high qual- 
ity of life and to the support of the 
area's cultural institutions extended to 
the Missouri Botanical Garden. 
Through his work with the Louis D. 
Beaumont Foundation, he was respon- 
sible in a large way for the construction 
of the John S. Lehmann Building (cen- 
ter of the Garden's botanical research 
program) and the Beaumont Room 
(the multipurpose room in the educa- 
tion wing of the Ridgway Center). 

He also gave his time, effort, and 
support for the development of the 
Gateway Arch, St. Louis Centre, the 
Pius XII Library at St. Louis University, 
and the Jewish Community Center 
now located at Lindbergh Blvd. and 
Schuetz Road 




Morton D. May 



If you're enchanted by the Japanese 
Garden and enticed by the Japanese 
Festival, this fall there's an opportunity 
you ought to look into: 

From November 4 until November 
20, the Garden will sponsor a tour to Ja- 
pan. Led by Alan Godlewski, the Gar- 
den's Chairman of Horticulture and an 
experienced traveler — Mr. Godlewski 
visited both China and Japan as part of 
the Garden's extensive exchange pro- 
grams with both nations in 1981— the 
tour will visit Tokyo, Mount Fuji, Oka- 
yama, and Osaka. Visitors will see the 
Imperial Palace, 16th Century castles, 
museums, and of course gardens. 
They'll ride the famous Bullet Train, and 
cruise the serene Inland Sea and see 
the internationally famous Chrysanthe- 
mum Festival at Hirakata. 

If you're interested in spending two 
weeks in one of the world's most exotic 
countries, contact Travelers' Choice at 
961-5080 



And there's more: 

If you'd like to visit the Far East this 
winter (from January 21st until February 
9) we're going to Hong Kong, Bangkok, 
Singapore, Jakarta, and Manila (to 
name only a few of the places). The trip 
will be led by Steven A. Frowine— Public 
Horticulture Specialist— who has led 
some of our most popular tours. Travel- 
ers will see some of the world's most 
ancient gardens. If you want to find out 
more, contact Sante Travel at 726-3040. 



13 



The Garden is participating in St. Louis' 
Operation Brightside, the major effort to 
beautify the city. Through Project Flower 
Shower, every student in the city's 170 
public and parochial schools was given 
12 flowers to cultivate in trays on class- 
room windowsills and to later plant on 
school grounds, vacant lots, and other 
public areas. Outstanding efforts will be 
recognized by awards given on August 
15 at the Garden. 

A second program, Project Blitz, of- 
fered neighborhood groups and church- 
es 300,000 seedlings for public plant- 
ings. 

As in Project Flower Shower, out- 
standing efforts will be recognized on 
August 15. 

Plantings must be completed in 
the current year, and applications by 
groups interested in being considered 
for the awards in both Projects must be 
completed by July 1. Applications may 
be obtained by calling the Garden at 
577-5140 or Operation Brightside at 
622-4203 



The Master Gardener program, a 
joint venture between the Garden and 
the University of Missouri Extension 
Service, enters its second year this 
fall. It provides an opportunity for the 
experienced amateur horticulturist to 
receive comprehensive and practical 
training in an eight-week course. 
There is no tuition charged for the pro- 
gram, but participants are required to 
perform volunteer work related to horti- 
culture within the community after 
graduation. Certified Master Garden- 
ers— 13 were graduated in the first 
year— already conduct plant clinics, 
work with students to establish school 
gardens, assist in the Arts for Older 
Adults program, and are a major part 
of the Garden's and Extension Ser- 
vice's public outreach programs. For 
an application, interested persons 
should contact the Garden's Educa- 
tion Department at 577-5140; partic- 
ipation is limited to 30 for this year. The 
application deadline is August 26. . . . 




The Second Annual Fall Craft 
Fair is set for Saturday and Sunday, 
October 8 and 9. Last year 10,000 peo- 
ple attended the first Fair, which fea- 
tured crafts ranging from paper mar- 
bling and watercolors to needlework 
and dried flower arrangements. Per- 
sons interested in displaying, demon- 
strating, selling their handiwork should 
send a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope with a request for an application 
to the Fall Craft Fair Committee, Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, 
St. Louis, Missouri 63166. Since space 
is limited, applications should be sub- 
mitted as soon as possible. Notifica- 
tions of space assignments will be 
made July 30 



New Members 

Contributing Members 

Dr and Mrs James H. Allen 
Mr and Mrs Leslie Armontrout 
Mr. and Mrs Robert G. Asperger 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Brackman 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Buchholz 
Mr. and Mrs. James S. Campbell 
Mrs Violet Cerutte 



Mr and Mrs Tom DeBenedetti 

Dennis J. Diez 

Mrs. Wm. F. Dohrmann 

Heimburger, Inc 

Mr Bill Horner 

Mr and Mrs James R. Kaye 

Kimberly Korman 

Mr. Albert E. Kreher 

Ms. Mary E Mahoney 

Mrs Mary Marschalk 

Mr. J S McKay, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs Edward L Meiser 

Mr and Mrs Robert Narmont 

Mrs John F. O'Neil, II 

Mr. and Mrs. Jay D Proops 

Mr and Mrs Gilbert L Rochan 

Dr Maxwell Ruchlin 

Mrs Dorothy Ryan 

Mrs. David C. Ryder, Sr. 

Mr and Mrs. Calvin E. Scher 

Mr and Mrs. David Shelton 

Miss Mar|orie A Triphaus 

Mr and Mrs Timothy T. Walsh 

Mr and Mrs J D. Wells 

Mr. and Mrs. Myers E Williamson 

Dr. and Mrs. Vallee L. Willman 

Mrs. George Winter, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs Albert Young 

Sustaining Members 

Mr and Mrs Richard J Detweiler 
Mr. and Mrs Lucien R Fouke, Jr, 
Mr Joe H Hunt 

Mr. and Mrs Arthur J. McDonnell 
Mr. and Mrs Donald E Schmittzehe 

Sponsoring Members 

Mr and Mrs Robert Irwin 

Mr and Mrs David W Mesker 



Increased 
Support 

Contributing Members 

Mr. and Mrs David C Anderson 

Mr. Edward S Angus 

Mr. and Mrs Richard H. Bauer 

Mr. and Mrs Bourne Bean 

Mr. and Mrs. Alvin J. Bockwmkel 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwm F. Branahl 

Mr. and Mrs. Beelis O Burkitt 

Mrs. C. E. Caspari. Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Castellani 

Mr. and Mrs. John T Clark 

Compton Hill Dental Office 

Mr and Mrs. John W Cross 

Mr. and Mrs. David A. Eppestine 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. Erhart 

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory S Fletcher 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Glass 

Mrs. Samuel F. Gordon 

Mrs. Stanley Hanks 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Havelka 

Mr. Robert M. Heaney 

Mr. Daniel C. Hellinger 

Ms. Mary L. Hoevel 

Ms. Nancy Homesley 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L Hoops 

Mr. and Mrs. Dorsey W Hurst 

Mr. and Mrs. Clement Jansen 

Mr. and Mrs Larry Jost 

Ms. Georgia Kahrhoff 

Kathleen W Kane 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W Kienker 

Mr and Mrs Wilmer C Koester 

Mr, and Mrs. Lawrence Langsam 

Miss Karen Larsen 

Cecelia M. Lehmann 

Mr William Lyon 

Martha Y. Mahaney 

Mrs. E. B. McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard McKeever 

Mr. George Meuser 

Ms Jaclyn Meyer 

Mr. Steven D. Mooneyham 



Mr and Mrs Ronald Morse 

Dr. and Mrs. John E Mullins 

Mrs. Mary J. Nietmann 

Mrs Marie C. Otis 

Mr Eli Perry 

Mr, and Mrs. R. W. Peterson 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmond Phillips 

Mr. Robert Pierron 

Mr. George Pitts 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Reardon 

Anne A Regenstreif 

Mr. and Mrs. William Reid 

Mr and Mrs. Harry S. Rosenberg 

Mr. Russell E. Rudolph 

Mr and Mrs. Paul E. Schoomer 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Schuchardt 

Mr. and Mrs R E. Schultz 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E Schwartz 

Mr. and Mrs. Eric P. Seller 

Mr. and Mrs. Jackson J Shinkle 

Mr. and Mrs. Y. Shiraishi 

Mr. Raymond J. Siebert 

Mr and Mrs. Roland Smith, Jr. 

Dr and Mrs Richard S Sohn 

Dennis Spellman 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Suppiger 

Mr. and Mrs Frank L. Taylor 

Mr and Mrs George H. Vollertsen 

Mr and Mrs Maw Shiu Wang 

Mr and Mrs Mark S. Weber 

Dr. E A. Wesirup 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard H. Wettach 

Dr. and Mrs. W. E. Williamson 

Mr. James M Wire 

Sustaining Members 

Mr. and Mrs Michael L Clement 

Mr. and Mrs Carl J. Deutsch 

Mr. and Mrs Marcus B Feldman 

Mr. and Mrs. Rick Forrestal 

Mr. and Mrs Donald R Franz 

Mr. Michael G Gratz 

Mr and Mrs. Donald P. James 

Mr Jeffrey L Marsh 

Mr Steven Mintz 

Mr and Mrs John H. Payne, Jr. 

Dr Robert W. Smith 

Mr William S. Schwab, Jr. 



Mr Steven Sherwood 

Kathleen Smith 

Mr. and Mrs Robert P. Tschudy 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer J. Weber 

Sponsoring Members 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold A. Brmner 

Dr. William S. Coxe 

Mr. and Mrs Richard W Duesenberg 

Ms Margaret A Kiefer 

Mr and Mrs. Wm. F. Klipsch. Jr 

Mr and Mrs Harold C. Mueller 

Mr and Mrs. Franklin H. Schapiro 

Mr and Mrs. James W Singer, Jr, 

Tributes 

March- April 1983 
IN HONOR OF: 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Aronson 

Mrs. Ben H Senturia 

Mr. Frank Bauman 

Lester and Judy Goldman 

Mrs. Ruby Becker 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Vigil 

Mrs. Gerald Eder 

Claire and Dick Marx 

Mr. Jack Jennings 

Webster Groves Garden Club, Group 4 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rhoads 

Mrs, A Herzog 

Mr. and Mrs A. H Lamack 

Mrs. J. McNulty 

Mrs. H Rinesmith 

Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Woodcock 

Mrs. Joan Rosenblum 

Mr and Mrs. Lester Adelson 

Mrs. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs Arnold Schwab 

Florence Stern 

Mr. and Mrs. John Sears 

Four Seasons Garden Club 

Don and Kristy Short 

Mr and Mrs Herbert M Talcoff 



14 



Lt. Col. Thomas R. Swisher 

Mrs. T. R Swisher 

IN MEMORY OF 

Opaline Anderson 

Beta Kappa Chapter of 

Delta Kappa Gamma 
Mr. Newell A. Augur 
Mrs. Kenneth H. Bitting 
Mrs. John G. Burton 
Mr. and Mrs. B B Culver, Jr. 
Mrs. Leicester B Faust 
Mrs. John H. Hayward 
Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 
Mrs A Wessel Shapleigh 
Mrs Edward C Simmons II 
Mrs. C. P. Whitehead 
Mrs. Dorothy N. Barthels 
Chused. Strauss, Chorlins, 

Bini & Kohn, Attorneys at Law 
Dr. Edward J. Becker 
Mr. and Mrs J. Marlon Engler 
Mrs. E. Bergman 
Leslie Gleason Hawksbee 
Adelaide Burns 
Mrs. Paul Bakewell, Jr. 
Mr. Percy N. Burton 
Tom S Eakin, Jr. 
Mrs. Fred Campbell 
Joyce E East 
Amelia Overall Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward L Bakewell, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis W. Baldwin, Jr 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence C Barksdale 
Mr. and Mrs George C. Bitting 
Mrs. Kenneth H Bitting 
Mr. and Mrs William A Borders 
Mr. and Mrs John Brodhead, Jr. 
Mrs. David C. Calhoun 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Cochran 
Mr Martin J. Crowe 
Mr. and Mrs B B. Culver. Jr 
Mr and Mrs. George H. Hall 
Mrs. John H Hayward 
Mr and Mrs. Henry O Johnston 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Boardman Jones, Jr. 
Mrs. Rembert W La Beaume 
Mrs. Carl E Lischer 
Mr John Peters MacCarthy 
Mr and Mrs Robert E. Otto 
Mrs Henry Rand 
Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 
Mr. Arthur B Shepley, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward C Simmons 
Mr. and Mrs Robert B. Smith 
Mary H. Snyder 
Mr. and Mrs Whitelaw T Terry 
Miss Beatrice Thake 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank A Thompson, Jr. 
Mrs. C. P. Whitehead 
Mr and Mrs. Ira Wight 
Mr and Mrs. Robert A Wood 
Mr and Mrs. Charles T. Woodside 
Rose M. Donati 
Robert M. Donati. M D. 
Mrs. Theodore C. Eggers 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack E. Krueger 
Mr. William N. Eisendrath, Jr. 
Mr. Tom S. Eakin, Jr. 
Mrs. Florence S. Guth 
Mrs. Henry Rand 
Mr. James Reed 
Mrs. William H. Schield 
Mr. and Mrs Ernest Trova 
Helen G. Wolff 
Peg and Ira Fischer 
Mr. G. W. Fischer 
Mrs Lewis C Nelson 
Mr. Freeman 
Mr. David Hagen 
Michael French 
Lester and Judy Goldman 
Mrs. Marion Freund 
Missouri Walk-Ways Association 
Mrs. Gladys M. Funsten 
Mrs James E Crawford 



Mrs Elizabeth S. Foster 
Mr. Edward S. Funsten. Jr. 
Mr Robert Lee Funsten 
Mr. Robert McK Jones 
Mr. Larry O Kemper 
Mrs. Roblee McCarthy 
Mr. and Mrs. A. Timon Primm III 
Mrs. A. Wessel Shapleigh 
Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Williams 
Mr. John Marcelles Groves 
Mr. and Mrs Howard Wilson 
Mr. Victor S. Hallauer 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sullivan 
Mrs. C. D. P. Hamilton 
Mrs. James E. Crawford 
Briggs R. Hoffman, Jr 
Charles R Hoffmann 
Mrs. Arthur Stockstrom 

Mr. Harold L. Harvey 

Dr and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 
Elinore Hayward 
Mr. and Mrs Richard W. Merkle 
Mrs. Fred A. Hermann 

Mr. William Pagenstecher 
Mrs. Annie Mae Hosch 

Doris B Rolf 

Mr. and Mrs G S. Rosborough, Jr. 

Mr. Sidney House 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Purk 

Mrs. Helen Hall Hutchison 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Timon Primm III 

Mrs. Laura May Isaacson 

Mr and Mrs J G Samuels, Sr. 

The St. Louis Herb Society 

Mr. and Mrs. William G. Jenkin 

Mr and Mrs. C. C Johnson Spink 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Keene 

Mr and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Helen Kendall 

Miss Charlotte B. Leu 

Mr. E. Byron Kinder 

Ellen F. Harris 

Elizabeth King 

Lucille Guise 

Edith Klein 

Ann and Peter Husch 

Mr. A. Sherwood Lee 

Mrs. Wilmer J. Bergheger 

Josephine Flory 

Mrs. Irene Gaffney 

Mrs Louise Gausewitz 

Mrs Clara Luscomb 

Mrs Mary Mann 

Mrs. Camilla Maurath 

Anita B Nold 

Mr. Brian F Randall 

Mrs. Bernice Schrand 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Tedesco 

Mr. and Mrs. John O Teichmann 

Mrs. Lillian Welz 

Mr. and Mrs. Irvin L. Worms 

Mrs. Toby Lewin 

Ben and Phyllis Adler 

Mr. Bernard H. Lindenbusch 

Brown Group, Inc 
Corporate Insurance and 
Pension Benefits Departments 

Miss Bonzel R. Mooney 

Mrs. Janet J. Livingston 

Mr. and Mrs Charles Cook 

Mrs. Henry L. Freund 

Mr. and Mrs. William A Lang 

Mr and Mrs. Edward Lieblick 

Mr. Wilfred F. Long 

Mrs. James E. Crawford 

Mrs. Margaret H. Loy 

Evadne Baker 

Mrs Wyllys K. Bliss 

Mr. and Mrs. J. John Brouk 

Mr. and Mrs. Blaine Carr 

Mr. and Mrs. Todd Clark 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Clinton 

Mrs. James M. Cosgrove 

Mrs. Dwight W. Coultas 

Mrs. Vera H. Cox 



Mrs. William W. Crowdus 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Duncker 

Mrs. Mildred Duncker 

Mr. and Mrs Ralph D'Oench 

Mr. William H. Engelsmann 

Miss Dorothy Hanpeter 

Dorothy and Harold Hanser 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Hoffman 

Stella Kojac 

Mr. and Mrs. John Lamkin, Sr. 

Mrs. Raymond E Lange 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Lange, Jr 

Vietta R. Lodwick 

Mrs. R. C. Mare 

Dr and Mrs. C. Alan McAfee 

Miss Carolyn McMahon 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin Meinberg 

Mrs. Virginia Meyer 

Mrs. Joan S. Murphy 

Mr and Mrs. P. H. Nichols 

Officers and Directors of the 

Boatmen's National Bank of St. Louis 
Mr and Mrs Thomas Patterson 
Dr and Mrs. Joseph C. Peden. Jr 
Mr. and Mrs. James E. Russell 
Mrs. R. B. Russell 
Leo S Shanley, D.D.S. 
Dons L Spencer 

Mr and Mrs. Charles H. Spoehrer 
Mrs. Hermann Spoehrer 
Mrs. Teddy H Stauf 
Mr. and Mrs Carl Swinburne 
The Ladue Garden Club 
The Weston Paper & Mfg. Co. 
Mrs. William M. Van Cleve 
Mrs. William G. von Weise 

Mrs. Eva Higson Luyties 

Mrs. J. M. Feehan 

Mr. Frank O. Marshall 

Mrs. Mabel A. McSkimming 
May C. Maune 

Mr. and Mrs Mahmoud Kia 
Mr. George J Chamberlain 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Chamberlain 
and family 

Morton D. May 

Mr and Mrs. Lester Adelson 

Mrs. Noel McDowell 

Ms. Gladys Abington 

Ms. A. L Roffmann 

Sr. Hulda Weise 

Ms. Nancy Wohl 

Ms. S. Wood 

Mrs. Arthur L. McMahon 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Clinton 

Mrs. Raymond E. Lange 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Lange, Jr. 

Mrs. Sally M. McNally 

Erna Eisendrath 

Mr and Mrs Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Maurice Mendle 

Teel Ackerman 

Martin Israel 

Norma and Morton Singer 

Mrs Lloyd C Stark 

Mr and Mrs. H. M Talcoff 

Mr. Oren F. Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Monte C. Throdahl 

Mr. Owen H. Mitchell 

Mrs. William S. Bedal 

Tom S. Eakin, Jr 

Miss Edith Murch 

Laura Briscoe 

Mr and Mrs. Myron Gwinner 

Inez Howard 

Mr. Hulon Myers 

Mr. James V Moore 

Mr. Fred J Rock 

Lillian Newell 

Joseph and Shirley Anton 

Mrs. Ida Pellegrino 

Sara and Warren Glickert 

Miss Alma Poelling 

Miss Ruth Heinicke 

Mr. Willard Polzin 

Mr and Mrs. Dale W. Ehlers 



Myrtle Pope 

Marlene Chapman 

Dawn Roady 

M. Gail Isringhausen 

Floyd Root 

Miss Marian Barnholtz 

Miss Gerry Barnholtz 

Eva Schnurman 

Ellen F. Harris 

Mrs. Frank See 

Mr and Mrs. George Barnes, Jr. 

Mr. Alvin Segelbohm 

Mr and Mrs Lawrence P. Lord 

and Family 
Mrs. Elsie Sekrit 
Miss Adele Korte 
Mrs. Elizabeth L. Sheldon 
Mrs Kenneth H. Bitting 
Mrs Dwight W. Coultas 
Mr. Ray Shockley 
Mr. and Mrs. Newell A. Baker 
Mr. Harold W. Smith 
Mrs. Helen H. Rashcoe 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Spink 
Mr. and Mrs. C. C Johnson Spink 
Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Taylor Spink 
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 
Mr. Stampehl 
Mr. Dan Lowery 
Mr. Samuel R. Suchart 
Mrs. Morris Suchart 
Marie Taylor Spink Sweeney 
Mr and Mrs Andrew H. Baur 
Mr and Mrs C C. Johnson Spink 
Mrs. Charles Terry 
The Planters Garden Club of St Louis 
Marie B. Thiele 
Mr and Mrs. Lea Dorrance 
Barbara Roberts 
Mrs. Nita Larie Ulmer 
Mr and Mrs G K. Sandweg 
Viola Villardi 
Elsie Weekly 
Mrs. William Walker 
Mrs. Florence Guth 
Mr. Marvin K. Warren 
David and Patricia Hagen 
Mrs. Effie Elizabeth Wegner 
Berbaum Millwork, Inc. 
Mr and Mrs. Jacob J Bingaman 
Mildred E. Bond 
Dr. and Mrs. Ralph Gieselman 
Mrs Jay A. LeCrone 
Thelma N Reynolds 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Robb 
Karen Speros 
The Forsythia Garden Club 

East Central District 
The Peter Schott Family 
UWM— Union Administrative Staff 
UWM — Union Maintenance/Facilities 

Staff 
Mr. and Mrs. D G Wegner 
Mrs. Albert White 
Mr. Richard Weiss 
Mrs. W. Pedrick Conway 
Ellen F. Harris 
Mrs. Gloria Hogbin Luitjens 
Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Talcoff 
Miss Eugenia Wells 
Alexander and Elizabeth Bakewell 
Mrs Harriet M. Bakewell 
Mrs. William H. Biggs 
Marion Ford Ferriss 
Mrs John H. Hayward 
The Planters Garden Club of St Louis 
Mrs. Daniel Upthegrove 
Phillipine Wicks 
Missouri Botanical Garden Guides 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert C Purk 
Mrs. Josephine Green Wood 
Mrs Paul Bakewell, Jr. 
Mr and Mrs. B B. Culver, Jr. 
Mr. Robert E Kresko 
Mrs Charles Lamy 



Nine Days of Japan 
in St. Louis 

For the eighth year, the Garden 
brings a bit of Japan to the heart of St. 
Louis with its nine-day Japanese Fes- 
tival. Sponsored for the second consec- 
utive year by The Seven-Up Company, 
the Festival runs this year from June 18 
until June 26. What can you expect? 

Miss Japan 1983 will open the Fes- 
tival. 

Folk Dancers 

Japanese Storytelling 

A Candy Sculptor 

Martial Arts Performers 

The Taiko Drummers 

Music 

Food 

Last year, 50,000 came and were 
thrilled by the Festival. If you weren't 
one of them, join them this year. If you 
were, come again: It's a special time of 
the summer in St. Louis. 




MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN-0026-6507) 

P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST LOUIS, MO. 



* 



m 




Volume LXXI, Number 5 
August, 1983 



Missouri 

Botanical 

Garden 

Bulletin 



Herbarium Accessions Three -Millionth Specimen 




The Garden's herbarium officially accessioned its three- 
millionth specimen on April 20, 1983. The specimen was pre- 
sented to two important groups of people who have contributed 
greatly to the success of the Garden's herbarium over the past 
several years: The Garden's Board of Trustees and the Botany 
Department's corps of volunteers. The three-millionth spec- 
imen was the type or standard specimen of a new species, 
Philodendron davidsonii, collected in Costa Rica. Selection of 
this specimen to be marked as number 3 million emphasizes 
the important research being done at the Garden on the Ara- 
ceae (aroid family) by Dr. Thomas B. Croat, Paul A. Schulze 
Curator of Botany, and his associates. It also emphasizes the 
Garden's commitment to carry out botanical research and ex- 
ploration in the tropics. 

The Garden's herbarium has grown from about 60,000 



specimens when Henry Shaw began the collection through the 
purchase of a private herbarium in Europe to its present size of 
approximately three-million specimens. The one-millionth 
specimen was added to the collection in about 1931 , and the 
two-millionth in 1969. Since the mid-1960s, when the Garden's 
research program was revitalized, the collection has expanded 
in size and importance very rapidly. At the time of the acces- 
sioning of the two-millionth specimen, the Herbarium staff con- 
sisted of four curators and four support personnel. Today that 
same staff has grown to 22 Ph.D-level curators and a support 
staff of about 30. The Garden's commitment to maintaining its 
position as the world leader in the exploration of tropical areas 
is based on the realization that many of the plants in these 
areas will be extinct by early in the next century and if we are 
ever to know anything about them, it is up to our generation, 
through institutions such as the Garden, to find it out. 

—Marshall Crosby, Director of Research 

Plants and Man 

Roberto Burle Marx, called one of 
the world's greatest living landscape 
designers, received the Albert P. and 
Blanche Y Greensfelder Award from 
the Missouri Botanical Garden in 
May. In conjunction with the award 
ceremony, Mr. Burle Marx delivered 
the annual Greensfelder Lecture, en- 
titled "Plants and Man. " excerpts of 
which appear below. During his illus- 
trious career that has spanned six 
decades, he has won several presti- 
gious awards, both for his work in 
landscape design and for his paint- 
ing. He landscaped Brasilia. Brazil, 
and also designed the largest public 
park in Venezuela as well as public 
and private gardens in South America 

and Europe. He is strongly committed to the preservation of the flora of his 
native Brazil and has financed several botanical expeditions; several genera 
and species of native Brazilian plants have been named for him in recognition 
of his conservation activities. The Greensfelder Award, established in 1980, 
recognizes those who have made substantial contributions to conservation 
and urban improvement. Previous recipients include Wayne C. Kennedy, 
August A. Busch, Jr. and Leonard Hall 

From the time in history when certain tribes settled in spe- 
cific geographic locations, man began to create spaces for the 
systematic cultivation of plants. These may have been clear- 
ings in the forest, where the crops planted had to be constantly 
protected from the rampant growth of other plants, which were 
of no benefit to him; they may have been spots in the desert in 
which plant growth had to be encouraged by artificial irrigation; 

(continued on page 4) 




Roberto Burle Marx 



Comment 



One of the most interesting and exciting 
developments included in our Master Plan, 
announced in 1972, is a Home Gardening 
Center. For the last three years, we have had 
such a center — the Demonstration Vegeta- 
ble Garden. This existing garden, however, 
is only a fraction of the scale called for in our 
Master Plan. This demonstration garden has 
given us the opportunity to display for our 
visitors both common and unusual vegetable varieties and to 
show them how to cultivate them; a small exhibit adjacent to the 
garden itself displays the types of grasses commonly used in 




HENRY SHAW 
ASSOCIATES 

Anonymous 

Mr. and Mrs Adam Aronson 

Mrs Newell A Augur 

Mrs Agnes F. Baer 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard F. Baer 

Mr and Mrs Edward L Bakewell. Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H Bascom 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl L A Beckers 

Ms. Sally J. Benson 

Mr. and Mrs. Brooks Bernhardt 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert G. Blanke, Jr 

Mr and Mrs John G Buettner 

Mr. and Mrs William H. T. Bush 

Mrs J Butler Bushyhead 

Mr and Mrs Jules D. Campbell 

Mrs. Jean-Jacques Carnal 

Miss Adelaide Cherbonnier 

Mrs. Fielding T Childress 

Mr. and Mrs Fielding L. Childress 

Mr and Mrs Gary A. Close 

Mr Sidney S Cohen 

Mr and Mrs Franklin J Cornwell. Sr 

Mrs. Edwin R. Culver, Jr 

Mrs. Elsie Ford Curby 

Dr. and Mrs William H Danforth 

Mr. Sam'l C Davis 

Mr Alan E Doede 

Mr and Mrs H. R. Duhme, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Robert Edwards 

Mr and Mrs. David C Farrell 

Mrs. Mary Plant Faust 

Mr. and Mrs. John H Ferring 

Mrs. Clark P. Fiske 

Mr. and Mrs Robert B Forbes 

Mrs. Eugene A Freund 

Mrs. Henry L Freund 

Mr. S. E. Freund 

Mr. Edward S Funsten, Jr. 

Mr Robert Lee Funsten 

Mrs. Clark R. Gamble 

Dr. and Mrs Leigh L Gerdme 

Mr. Samuel Goldstein 

Mr. Stanley J. Goodman 

Mrs. Mildred Goodwin 

Mr. and Mrs W Ashley Gray, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs W L Hadley Griffin 

Miss Anna Hahn 

Dr. and Mrs Thomas S Hall 

Mr and Mrs. Norman W Halls 

Mrs. Ellis H. Hamel 

The Hanley Partnership 

Mrs. Marvin Harris 

Mr and Mrs Whitney R Harris 

Mr. and Mrs George Hasegawa 

Mrs John H Hayward 

Mr and Mrs Harvard K. Hecker 

Mr William Guy Heckman 

Mr and Mrs Robert R. Hermann 

Mr and Mrs Lee Hunter 

Mrs John Kenneth Hyatt 

Mr. and Mrs. B. F Jackson 

Mrs. Margaret Mathews Jenks 

Mr and Mrs J Eugene Johanson 



Mr. and Mrs. Henry O Johnston 

Mr. and Mrs. W Boardman Jones. Jr. 

Mrs A F Kaeser 

Dr and Mrs John H. Kendig 

Mr and Mrs. Samuel M. Kennard III 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer G Kiefer 

Mr A P. Klose 

Mr and Mrs. William S Knowles 

Mr and Mrs. Robert E Kresko 

Mr and Mrs. Hal A. Kroeger, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs. Charles S. Lamy 

Mr and Mrs. Oliver M Langenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Langsdorf, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. John C Lathrop 

Mr and Mrs John C Lebens 

Mrs. John S Lehmann 

Mr. and Mrs Willard L. Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley L. Lopata 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Dean Mann 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Maritz 

Mr. Harry B. Mathews III 

Mrs. Roblee McCarthy 

Mrs James S. McDonnell. Jr, 

Mr. and Mrs. Sanford N, McDonnell 

Mr. and Mrs. Roswell Messing, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. I. E Millstone 

Mr and Mrs. Hubert C Moog 

Mr and Mrs. John W Moore 

Mr and Mrs. Thomas M Moore 

Mrs W Gillespie Moore 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter L. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Enc P. Newman 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr and Mrs. C. W. Oertli 

Mrs. John M. Olin 

Mr. Spencer T. Olin 

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Orthwein, Jr 

Mrs. Elizabeth R. Pantaleoni 

Mrs Jane K. Pelton 

Miss Jane E Piper 

Mr. and Mrs Vernon W. Piper 

Mrs Herman T. Pott 

Mrs Miquette M. Potter 

Pratt Buick. Inc. 

Mr and Mrs. A. Timon Primm III 

Mr and Mrs. Joseph A. Richardson 

Mr and Mrs. F. M. Robinson, Jr 

Mr. Stanley T. Rolfson 

Mr. and Mrs. G S. Rosborough, Jr 

Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F Ruwitch 

Mr, and Mrs. Louis Sachs 

Mr. and Mrs Louis E Sauer 

Mrs. William H. Schield 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Thomas F. Schlafly 

Mrs Frank H Schwaiger 

Mrs Mason Scudder 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Shaikewitz 

Mrs. A. Wessel Shapleigh 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mrs. Thomas W Shields 

Mrs. John M Shoenberg 

Mr and Mrs. Robert H. Shoenberg 

Mr and Mrs. Sydney Shoenberg, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mrs. Tom K. Smith, Sr. 



lawns in our St. Louis area. 

The experience with the Demonstration Vegetable Garde 
has been a good one for us. We have received many favorab 
comments from visitors; we have also received suggestions froi 
them regarding the types of exhibits they think appropriate f< 
such an area, and during this three-year experiment we hav 
been able to display many new and unique vegetable garde 
plants. 

Now we are preparing to begin development of the full-seal 
Home Gardening Center — a five-acre garden to be located ju: 
north of the Japanese Garden. In addition to a vegetable garde 
area, and an exhibit of grasses, it will include a diversity < 

(continued on page 



Mr and Mrs Tom K. Smith. Jr. 

Mr and Mrs Wallace H. Smith 

Mrs. Sylvia N. Souers 

Mr. and Mrs. C C Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Hermann F. Spoehrer 

Mrs. Robert R Stephens 

Mr and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mrs. Mildred E. Stifel 

Mr. and Mrs Leon R. Strauss 

Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius F. P. Stueck 

Mr. and Mrs. Hampden Swift 

Mrs. Martha Love Symington 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar L. Taylor, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L Tooker 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Towle 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack L. Turner 

Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace, Jr, 

Mr, and Mrs. Edward J. Walsh, Jr, 

Mrs. Horton Watkins 

Mr and Mrs Richard K Weil 

Mrs. S. A Wemtraub 

Mr and Mrs Ben H. Wells 

Mr and Mrs. B. K. Werner 

Mr and Mrs. O Sage Wightman III 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene F. Williams. Jr 

Mrs. John M Wolff 

Mr. and Mrs Donald D Wren 

Miss F. A Wuellner 

Mrs. Elizabeth N. Young 

Mrs. Eugene F. Zimmerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew R. Zmsmeyer 

Mr. and Mrs Sander B Zwick 

DIRECTOR'S 
ASSOCIATES 

Anonymous 

Mrs. Arthur B. Baer 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Perry Bascom 

Ms. Allison R. Brightman 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Pharr Brightman 

Mrs. Richard I Brumbaugh 

Mr. and Mrs. G A Buder, Jr. 

Mrs. David R. Calhoun. Jr 

Mr. Maris Cirulis 

Consolidated Grain & Barge Co 

Mrs. Robert Corley 

Mrs. Dwight W Coultas 

Mr. and Mrs John L. Davidson, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs Henry P. Day 

Mr Bernard F. Desloge 

Mrs Joseph Desloge. Sr, 

Echo Valley Foundation 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Galloway 

Mr. Hollis L. Garren 

Mrs. Christopher C. Gibson 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Hedley 

Dr. and Mrs. August Homeyer 

Mrs. John Valle Janes, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs M Alexander Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy W. Jordan 

Dr. and Mrs. David M Kipnis 

Mr. and Mrs Harold Koplar 

Mr. and Mrs Thorn Lewis 

Mr. and Mrs Eldrige Lovelace 

Mr and Mrs David G. Lupo 

Mr. and Mrs James S. McDonnell III 



Mr. and Mrs. J. Ben Miller 

Mr. and Mrs Shadrach F. Morris. Jr 

Mr and Mrs Donn Carr Musick, Jr 

Mr and Mrs William L Nussbaum 

Mrs Harry E Papin, Jr 

Mrs, Jean M Pennington 

Mr, and Mrs. Richard B. Perry 

Mrs. Drue Wilson Philpott 

Mrs. Ralph F. Piper 

Mr. Dominic Ribaudo 

Mr and Mrs Sidney Richman 

Mr. and Mrs Robert A Ridgway 

Mrs. Edward J Riley, Jr. 

Mrs. John R. Ruhoff 

Mr and Mrs. Charles M. Ruprecht 

Safeco Insurance Company 

Mr. Don R. Schneeberger 

St Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Co. 

Mr and Mrs. Leon B Strauss 

Miss Lillian L. Stupp 

Mr and Mrs. Harold E. Thayer 

Mrs Sidney B. Trelease 

Mrs. Mahlon B. Wallace, Jr. 

Watlow Electric Company 

Dr Clarence S Weldon 

Dr Virginia V Weldon 

Mr. and Mrs. Don L Wolfsberger 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Zorensky 

C C Johnson Spink 
President. Board of Trustees 

Mrs. Walter G. Stern, President, 
Executive Board of the Members 

Dr. Peter H. Raven 
Director 

8^3 Member of 

^5 The Arts and Education 

Fund of Greater St. Louis 

The MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN 
BULLETIN is published seven times a 
year, in February, April. May. June. 
August October, and December by the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower 
Grove. St. Louis. Mo 63110 Second 
Class postage paid at St Louis, Mo 
$12 00 per year. $15 foreign 
The Missouri Botanical Garden 
Bulletin is sent to every Member of the 
Garden as one of the benefits of their 
membership. For a contribution as 
little as $30 per year. Members also 
are entitled to: free admission to the 
Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitations to special 
events and receptions; announce- 
ments of all lectures and classes; dis- 
counts in the Garden shops and for 
course fees; and the opportunity to 
travel, domestic and abroad, with 
other Members For information, 
please call 577-5100 
Postmaster send address changes to 
P.O. Box 299. St. Louis, MO 63166 



Gardening in St. Louis 

Gardening in the Shade 

Many of the older city and county homes in the St. Louis 
area are surrounded by large, stately, deciduous and ever- 
green trees and shrubs. These plants create an inviting, cool, 
green environment, but adding plants to this shady area does 
present a challenge. 

First let's discuss the word "shade." It is not an exact term. 
Dense shade is that found under evergreens; few plants can 
tolerate this low-light area. Diffused shade created by tall, de- 
ciduous oaks provides much more light and allows us addi- 
tional growing possibilities. In partial shade, such as in a clear- 
ing where four to five hours per day of direct sunlight strikes 
plants, many annuals and perennials will thrive. The lists of 
plants at right will do well in a diffused to partially shady area. 

Many hardy ferns, wildflowers and spring flowering bulbs 
are also recommended. When choosing spring flowering bulbs 
for a shade area, choose those species and hybrids which 
flower early in the spring so that they will have a chance to 
bloom and mature before dense foliage develops on the over- 
head deciduous trees. Crocus {Crucus spp. and hybrids), 
Snowdrops {Galanthus nivalis), Winter aconite {Eranthis hyem- 
alis), Anemone blanda, Glory-of-the-Snow (Chinodoxa spp.), 
Squill (Scilla sibirica), and Grape Hyacinth (Muscari botryoides) 
are good ones to try. 

Daffodils {Narcissus spp. and hybrids) grow best in a bright 
area where they are only shaded by large, open deciduous 
trees. They will not do well in an area which is in dense shade. 
Growing Pointers for Listed Shade Plants 

1. Now is the time to start seeds of biennials and peren- 
nials listed. Seedlings can be over-wintered in a cold frame or 
planted into the garden and protected with mulch. 

2. Plant trees and shrubs, ground covers and vines in the 
early fall when the temperature has cooled down. 

3. Spring blooming bulbs can be planted in October and 
November. 

4. Annuals can be started indoors in February and March 
and transplanted into the outside garden in May. 

5. Summer bulbs can be started indoors in containers in 
March and transplanted outdoors in May or started directly out- 
doors in the garden as soon as the threat of frost is gone in 
early to mid-May. 

6. Ferns and wildflowers are usually planted in early 
spring. —Steven A. Frowine, Public Horticulture Specialist 



Shovel, Hoe, Radio 

As every month, Missouri Botanical Garden staff members 
and volunteers will be featured on the radio discussing garden- 
ing problems and answering questions pertaining to plant care, 
landscaping, and related topics. 

During August and September, the Garden's Public Horti- 
culture Specialist, Steve A. Frowine (who writes "Gardening in 
St. Louis") will appear twice a month on KMOX-AM (1120 on 
the dial) as follows: Wednesday, August 3 (3-4 p.m.)- Major 
Topic: Harvesting Vegetables; Saturday, August 20 (3-4 p.m.) 
-Major Topic: Controlling Insects and Diseases; Friday, Sep- 
tember 17 (3-4 p.m.)- Major Topic: Fall Lawn Care. 

During September, two Answer Service volunteers and 
Master Gardeners and the Garden's Rosarian, David Vismara 
will appear on KFUO-AM (850 on the dial) in "How Does Your 
Garden Grow." The program airs at 9:20 a.m. until 10:00 a.m. 



Annuals 

Blue Torenia (Torenia fourieri) 
Browallia (Browallia speciosa) 
Coleus {Coleus hybridus) 
Flowering Tobacco {Nicotiana 

alata) 
Forget-Me-Not (Myosotis 

sylvatica) 
Impatiens (Impatiens sultani and 

hybrids) 
Madagascar Periwinkle 

(Catharanthus roseus) 
Monkey Flower (Mimulus 

tigrinus) 
Spider Flower {Cleorne spinosa) 
Sweet Alyssum {Lobularia 

mantima) 
Wax Begonia (Begonia 

semperflorens) 
Woodruff (Asperula onentalis) 

Biennials 

Cup-and-Saucer (Campanula 
medium var. calycantha) 

English Daisy (Bellis 
perennis) 

Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) 

Perennials 

Beebalm (Monarda didyma) 
Bleeding Heart (Dicentra spp. 

and hybrids) 
Christmas Rose (Helleborus 

niger) 
Columbine (Aquilegia spp. and 

hybrids) 
Crested Iris (Iris cristata) 
Early Blue Violet (Viola palmata) 
Garden Phlox (Phlox paniculata) 
Heart Leaf Brunnera (Brunnera 

macrophylla) 
Hosta (Hosta spp. and hybrids) 
Japanese Iris (Iris /aponica) 
Japanese Primrose (Primula 

japonica) 
Johnny Jump-Up Violet (Viola 

tricolor) 
Lenten Rose (Helleborus 

orientalis) 
Peony (Paeonia spp. and 

hybrids) 
Polyanthus Primrose (Primula 

polyanthus) 
Sweet Violet (Viola odorata) 
Woodland Phlox (Phlox 

divancata) 

Summer Bulbs 

Caladiums (Caladium x 

hortulanum) 
Tuberous Begonia (Begonia 

tuberhybrida) 
Elephant's Ear (Colocasia 

antiquorum) 

Vines 

Silverlace Vine (Polygonum 

aubertii) 
Virgin's Bower (Clematis spp. 

and hybrids) 
Virginia Creeper 

(Parthenocissus quinquefolia) 



Trees 

Allegheny Serviceberry 

(Amelanchier laevis) 
American Beech (Fagus 

grandiflora) 
Black Cherry (Prunus serotma) 
Common Sassafras (Sassatrass 

albidum) 
European Beech (Fagus 

sylvatica) 
European Hornbeam (Carpinus 

betulus) 
Flowering Dogwood (Cornus 

florid a) 
Kousa Dogwood (Cornus kousa) 
River Birch (Betula nigra) 
Sourwood (Oxydendrum 

arboreum) 
Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum) 

Shrubs 

Bloodtwig Dogwood (Cornus 

sanguinea) 
Common Witchhazel (Hamamelis 

virginiana) 
Common Spicebush (Lindera 

benzoin) 
European Privet (Ligu strum 

vulgare) 
Flowering Quince (Chaenomeles 

speciosa) 
Fragrant Sumac (Rhus 

aromatica) 
Japanese Barberry (Berbens 

thunbergi) 
Oakleaf Hydrangea (Hydrangea 

quercifolia) 
Various Azaleas and Rhodo- 
dendrons (Rhododendron spp 

and hybrids) 
Various Viburnums (Viburnum 

spp. and hybrids) 
Yews (Taxus baccata. 

T. cuspidata) 



Ground Covers 

Ajuga (Ajuga reptans) 
Bethlehem Sage (Pulmonaria 

saccharata) 
Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis) 
Cowslip Lungwort (Pulmonaria 

augustifolia) 
Dwarf Lily Turf (Ophiopogon 

japonicus) 
English Ivy (Hedera helix) 
European Ginger (Asarum 

europaeum) 
Lily-of-the-Valley (Convallana 

ma/alis) 
Long Spur Epidendrum 

(Epidendrum grandiflorum) 
Pachysandra (Pachysandra 

terminalis) 
Persian Epidendrum 

(Epidendrum pinnatum) 
Sweet Woodruff (Asperula 

odorata) 
Vinca (Vine a minor) 
Wild Strawberry (Fragaria 

virginiana) 



Thursday, September 1: Elmer Wiltsch, Answer Service/ 
Master Gardener; Thursday, September 8: Carol Taxman, 
Answer Service/Master Gardener; Thursday, September 15: 
David Vismara, Missouri Botanical Garden Rosarian. 

Your radio is now one of your most important gardening 
tools. 



Comment 



(continued from page 2) 



home landscape styles and garden 
areas appropriate for small yards. The 
intention of the area is to provide a 
number of ideas for our visitors which 
they can incorporate into their own 
gardens and yards; it will become the 
center for new educational programs 
about all aspects of gardening. 

At the present time, we are soliciting 
ideas, comments, and suggestions from 
our Members and others; we are asking: 
what kinds of vegetables would you like 
to see in the center; what kind of trees 
and shrubs; are you interested in how to 
grow plants in containers; do you want 
demonstrations of the best methods of 
growing a lawn; what are the most diffi- 
cult areas for you to landscape? 

This garden will be for everyone who 



New Places to Visit 



enjoys any aspect of gardening; we sin- 
cerely want it to give to our visitors the 
kinds of displays and information they 
consider most important and pertinent. 
Therefore, I am asking you to send any 
comments you may have to us at: 

Home Garden Center 

Missouri Botanical Garden 

P.O. Box 299 

St. Louis, Missouri 63166 
I want to acknowledge the generosity 
of Dr. Walter L. and Dorothy Mahaffey 
Moore who have made the detailed plan- 
ning for the Center possible. We will 
keep you informed of all developments 
of the Home Demonstration Center 
through regular articles in the Bulletin. 



&Ju^Q< 



CUj-t^_y 




Just north of the Flora Gate is a new 
Hosta Garden, given in memory of Marie 
Schaeffer Shields by her children. Al- 
though it is now in its earliest stages of 
development, it still offers visitors the 
opportunity to see hostas and other 
companionable plants that are suitable 
for shady garden areas, including bleed- 
ing hearts, ferns, and true lilies. Later, 
early spring bulbs will be in evidence. 
According to Alan Godlewski, Chairman 
of Horticulture, by summer of 1984 the 
Hosta Garden will offer an extremely 
lush display 



A dry stream bed garden is now located 
on the knolls, given in memory of Ben 
Weisman by Patsy Hilda Weintraub. 
Along the stream bed portion of the 
garden are featured exotic grasses, sev- 
eral species of iris including the native 
water iris, and variegated red-stemmed 
dogwood. Around the pool at the gar- 
den's north end are a variety of cattails, 
three varieties of water lily, and dwarf 
lotus 



Plants and Man 



(continued from page 1) 



m m m &. ,a» 

>Ti iji »Ti »*i iji 



or a place like Holland where land used 
for cultivation was actually wrested from 
the sea and constantly defended against 
it by the erection and maintenance of 
dikes and drainage ditches. The original 
purpose of these cultivated landscapes 
was undoubtedly economic. Man raised 
plants for their food or medicinal value 
— but very soon he must have attributed 
to certain plants aesthetic and even 
magical qualities, and he began to 
cultivate some of them for their colors, 
form and scent. 

Eventually, man began to set aside 
spaces which were devoted exclusively 
to the cultivation of plants for sheer 
visual pleasure. Perhaps at first he grew 
a bit of everything he liked, but by and by 
he began to select certain colors and 
establish certain rhythms and patterns. 
He turned these pleasure grounds from 
mere plant collections into visually 
meaningful and harmonious composi- 
tions. The stylistic development of these 
early gardens was to a great extent de- 
termined by the geographic and climatic 
conditions in which they developed. The 
Near Eastern peoples, whose life and 
agriculture depended on careful irriga- 
tion and the preservation of natural 
springs, held water sacred. Islamic cul- 
ture spread this reverence for water from 
Persia all the way to the Moghul gardens 
in India and the Moorish gardens in 
Spain, where each court is centered on 
a pool or finely wrought fountain, in 
which water always flows, even during 
the dry season. 

However, garden styles are not 
always strictly determined by geo- 
graphic and economic conditions — cer- 
tainly the Zen Buddhist garden did not 
grow out of any agricultural practice. Its 
purpose was religious; it served to 
induce introspection and contemplation 
of nature and universe. On the other 
hand the great baroque gardens of Italy, 
although built mostly by Cardinals, had 
no religious significance at all. 

To a vigorous, extroverted and 
exhibitionist period, the building of 
gardens offered an opportunity to prove 
men's dominance over nature, to dem- 
onstrate his inventive spirit, and to 
shape the topography and even the 
vegetation according to his artistic pre- 
cepts. 



The fashion for huge tropical leaves 
and for rich tropical colors: oranges, 
scarlets and very hot pinks, vivid purples 
and very sharp yellows — colors which 
hardly exist among the temperate flora 
— arose from the travels of men like Gar- 
dener, St. Hilaire, Bonplan and Martius 
in South America, and from their great 
enthusiasm for what they saw. They sent 
back descriptions, in some cases draw- 
ings, in others seeds and actual plants, 
and these came in time to form Winter 
Gardens, houses in immense conserva- 
tories in all the capitals of Europe. It was 
in one of these conservatories that I my- 
self, at the age of twenty, first became 
aware of the special quality, the drama, 
and at the same time the complexity of 
the Brazilian flora. 

I pointed out at the beginning of this 
lecture how the physical conditions of a 
country may determine man's attitude 
towards nature — and eventually their 
development of gardens. In my native 
Brazil man was very much in the posi- 
tion of those early tribes who had to 
make a clearing in the jungle, and then 
defend their crops from the overwhelm- 
ing growth of natural vegetation. To the 
European settler who colonized Brazil, 
the vegetation was especially threaten- 
ing and fearsome because it differed so 
much from the familiar forests of his 
homeland — so, nature came to be re- 
garded as the enemy which had to be 
destroyed and replaced by more familiar 
forms — and, I am sad to say that, in 
general, this attitude still prevails. 

In Brazil as elsewhere in the Amer- 
icas, garden styles have followed more 
or less European patterns. In the 18th 
century we had the formal avenues de- 
rived from the French Garden. Later, a 
French engineer, Francois Marie Gla- 
ziou, introduced the English landscape 
style, but in a somewhat 19th century 
version. But he also brought a new free- 
dom to the Brazilian garden. His trees 
were not planted in straight rows— they 
were grouped informally on large 
expanses of lawn. He also began using 
tropical plants such as pandanus, 
alocasia, and several imported palms. 
By the twentieth century a gardenesque 
European style had made its appear- 
ance. In the gardens of my childhood the 
beds were planted with carnations, 
lavender and standard roses. I do not 
wish to deny the validity of this style — 
used in its proper place. But when I saw 
this public park, soon after the discovery 
of our native Philodendron speciosum in 
a hothouse at the Dahlem Botanical 
Garden of Berlin, I realized that such a 
plant would be altogether out of place in 



that kind of layout. I began to think of 
creating a garden which would provide 
the proper setting for our native flora, 
and whose design would in fact be in- 
spired by it. 

In 1934 I was appointed Director of 
Parks for the city of Pernambuco, in the 
north-east of Brazil. This position made 
it possible for me to experiment with my 
new ideas. I introduced native plants 
into public parks, which had never been 
used in a landscape setting. It gave the 
gardens a completely new look — they 
began to be Brazilian. Gradually a new 
expression in garden design evolved, 
befitting this kind of plant. 

In the 19th century, Gertrude Jekyll 
had reintroduced color to English gar- 
dens, from which flowers had been elim- 
inated during the development of the 
landscape park. Her herbaceous bor- 
ders were built up with a careful blend of 
colors — like impressionist paintings. 
She had at her disposal an immense 
wealth of flowering perrenials from North 
America, Southern Europe, Asia Minor 
and the Far East — plants from tem- 
perate zones, which I could not use. But 
I had [other] plant materials available: I 
expanded her borders and laid them out 
against the green lawn in large interlock- 
ing forms derived from the abstract 
paintings of our period. I also used 
groups of rocks in a sculptural sense or 
as places where I could plant brom- 
eliads, anthurium, philodendron, and 
orchids— just as I saw them growing on 
the rocky mountain sides around Rio. 

It is important to know that one can- 
not simply make a design on paper and 
later add plants to it. The plants must be 
in our thoughts from the beginning, and 
the design must be developed partly as 
a function of the species to be used. Just 
as a poet needs to know his language, 
so must the designers of parks and 
gardens have a knowledge of plants, 
including the eventual size, habit, 
texture, and color — their time of 
flowering and their precise effect on the 
landscape. Garden design, as any other 
art form, must be based on sound artis- 
tic principles, a firm knowledge of com- 
position, and a discerning taste. There 
are times when influences on my design 
are not derived from the plant world or 
from natural topography. I may receive a 
visual impression, when visiting a new 
city, of a certain arrangement of masses, 
colors and lights. This impression may 
first find its way into one of my abstract 
paintings and later influence the design 
of a garden plan. 

I would like to end this address by 
stressing that we live in a time in which 



an ever-increasing number of people 
live in metroplitan areas. As garden 
designers we must focus our attention 
on the city, where human beings are cut 
off from nature and have the greatest 
need to interact with plants. Tree-lined 
boulevards and a sufficient number of 
green spaces can restore the balance in 
our cities, which are getting vaster, 
harder, and more inhuman every day. 
The city dweller needs plants, and not 
just for the freshness and the oxygen 
they can provide. He needs them psy- 
chologically as well, perhaps because 
throughout its development the human 
race has been dependent on plant life 
for its survival. I have no objections to 
skyscrapers, if the space gained by 
building upward can be transformed into 
parks. 

One of the most restful things in life 
is to look at a tree-covered island, sur- 
rounded by the blue of the sea. We can- 
not reproduce the exact proportions of 
nature in a city, but in our parks we can 
transpose and symbolize some of the 
features of nature which give us such 
satisfaction. In the middle of the city, we 
can create ponds with green islands, 
and shelter them from the surrounding 
harshness, bustle and noise with belts of 
vegetation, as Olmstead did in Central 
Park. It is essential for the tranquility and 
mental health of urban dwellers that 
such green oases be dispersed through- 
out the city. These ideas are not new, 
and they are hard to refute. But unfortu- 
nately they often tend to remain on 
paper. In practice they are swept aside 
by the cold realities of the real estate 
market, and by the short-sighted expedi- 
ence of immediate financial gains. In the 
vicious circle of more intensive land use 
and the subsequent need for higher tax- 
ation, the municipalities are as respon- 
sible as the private speculator. 

It is our mandate as landscape archi- 
tects to make the public aware of their 
need for plants, and to see that govern- 
ments and town planners set aside dif- 
ferent areas for green spaces. As much 
as possible, the spaces should be linked 
in their design with the surrounding 
landscape and include the local vegeta- 
tion. Our responsibility extends not only 
to our fellow man, but to the plant world 
as well. In this age of hectic expansion, 
of a terrifying increase in world popula- 
tion — in an age when millions of acres 
of farmland and forests are lost every 
year to shortsighted exploitation and de- 
velopment, we must stand as the guard- 
ians of a natural patrimony, upon which 
ultimately rests the survival of the hu- 
man race! —Roberto Burle Marx 




With Garden Director, Peter H. Raven, 
is Gloria Sawyer, Director of Public Affairs 
of KSD and KSD-FM, Gannett Co. radio 
stations. Ms. Sawyer presented a check 
from the Gannett Foundation to the Gar- 
den for the support of the construction of 
the Ridgway Center. 



Education and Service 

Now entering its second year, the 
Master Gardener program offers experi- 
enced amateur horticulturists a unique 
and challenging opportunity to learn and 
to serve their community at the same 
time. Participants attend a series of 
comprehensive lectures and workshops, 
which lead to the certificate of Master 
Gardener. In lieu of tuition — there are 
only nominal charges for materials and 
literature — certified Master Gardeners 
agree to volunteer a specified number of 
hours in service to the St. Louis area. 

The first 13 Master Gardeners, who 
completed the program in February, 
1983, are currently assisting the Mis- 
souri Extension Service (who co-spon- 
sors the program with the Missouri Bo- 
tanical Garden) on a daily basis by re- 
sponding to gardening questions and 
problems from telephone requests; mak- 
ing regular presentations to community 
groups, including the Elder-hostel and 
Arts for Older Adults programs; staffing 
the Missouri Botanical Garden's Walk-in 
Plant Clinic; working with city schools in 
school gardening projects; and volun- 
teering in the Missouri Botanical Gar- 
den's 20-year-old Answer Service pro- 
gram. 

There are 30 openings for interested 
gardeners in the second session of 
classes which begin October 4. Applica- 
tions (the deadline for filing them is 
August 29) may be obtained by calling 
the Garden's Education Department at 
577-5140. 
6 



A Garden Party With Bobby Short 



Oh, what a party! The decorations, 
the music, the food, everything was just 
perfect. Perfect because of the many, 
many hours of planning and hard work 
donated by a wonderful committee. Spe- 
cial recognition is due for the unrelenting 
and unlimited time and effort put forth by 
the Gala chairmen, Mrs. Robert R. Her- 
mann, Mrs. Warren M. Shapleigh and 
Mrs. Walter G. Stern. Their enthusiasm 
and diligence were transmitted through- 
out the committee. 

The final outcome certainly show- 
cased all the hard work of the many 
people who made the evening a suc- 
cess. For example, Mrs. Hord Arm- 
strong coordinated all the arrangements 
for the fabulous gourmet dinner pre- 
pared by Erker Catering. Mrs. Bernard 
Brinker and Mrs. Robert H. Kittner were 
responsible for the fantastic attendance 
as they managed the ticket sales and 
reservations. Mrs. Pedrick Conway had 
the pleasure of escorting our guest of 
honor, Mr. Bobby Short, during his visit 
while Mrs. Charles Cook entertained 
"Mr. Omelet," Rudolph Stanish. The 
last-minute touches on the dinner tables 
in the Floral Display Hall and throughout 
the building were coordinated by Mrs. 
Bourne Bean, who received a great deal 
of help from her committee and superb 
ideas from Stix, Baer & Fuller. 

The Garden's rewards from "A Gar- 
den Party with Bobby Short" are cer- 
tainly many. Financially the party raised 
nearly $25,000 but it is impossible to 
measure the amount of interest and en- 



Recently the Garden's library received 
several contributions in memory of Sid- 
ney Trelease who died in the spring of 
1983. He was one of six children of Wil- 
liam Trelease, the Garden's first Director 
after Henry Shaw. William Trelease 
served in that office and resided in 
Tower Grove House from Shaw's death 
until 1913. Aside from Sidney, his chil- 
dren were two daughters who died in in- 
fancy and three sons, Frank (1887-1959), 
Sam (1892-1958), and William Trelease, 
Jr. who presently lives in California. The 
donations were used to acquire several 
attractive books, including The Stape- 
liae, a recent limited reproduction of a 
rare volume written in 1806 by Baron 
Nicolaus Joseph L.B.A. Jacquin; Gar- 
dens of a Golden Afternoon, a book de- 
scribing the more than 100 gardens de- 
signed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and Ger- 
trude Jekyll during the Victorian and 
Edwardian eras; an autographed Trans- 
vaal Wild Flowers, which contains text 



thusiasm it generated for the Ridgway 
Center and the Missouri Botanical 
Garden. 

The Garden wishes to acknowledge 
all members of the Gala Committee: 
Chairmen — Mrs. Robert R. Hermann, 
Mrs. Warren M. Shapleigh, Mrs. Walter 
G. Stern. Committee — Mrs. J. Hord 
Armstrong, III, Mrs. N. Arne Arneson, 
Mrs. Edwin S. Baldwin, Mrs. Walter F. 
Ballinger, Mrs. William Maffitt Bates, Jr., 
Mrs. Bourne Bean, Mrs. Bernard Brink- 
er, Mrs. John Brodhead, Mrs. William H. 
T. Bush, Mrs. Sumner S. Charles, Mrs. 
Pedrick Conway, Mrs. Charles Cook, 
Mrs. James E. Crawford, Jr., Mrs. Henry 
W. Dubinsky, Mrs. Richard T Grote, 
Mrs. August W. Hager, III, Mrs. Richard 
Holton, Mrs. Darrell Ingram, Mrs. Lan- 
don Y. Jones, Mrs. W. Boardman Jones, 
Mrs. O. Alexander Kerkhoff, Mrs. E. 
Lawrence Keyes, Jr., Mrs. Robert H. 
Kittner, Mrs. Willard L. Levy, Mrs. 
Joseph Lewis, Mrs. John Mackey, Mrs. 
Sanford McDonnell, Mrs. Shadrach F. 
Morris, Mrs. Jackson C. Parriott, Mrs. 
Michael Pulitzer, Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp, 
Mrs. William A. Sims, Jr., Mrs. Donald 
Schnuck, Mrs. Edward J. Schnuck, Mrs. 
Charles G. Schott, Jr., Mrs. Edward 
Stivers, Mrs. William P. Stiritz, Mrs. 
Joseph Werner, Mrs. Orrin S. Wightman, 
III, Mrs. Eugene F. Williams, Mrs. Don- 
ald D. Wren, Mrs. Bruce R. Yoder, Mrs. 
Andrew Zinsmeyer. 

Thank you for your generous sup- 

po rt . —Pa tricia A mold 

Membership Coordinator 



The Garden was saddened to learn of 
the death of one of its long-time 
friends, Mrs. Beatrice T. Hoskins, on 
June 4. A native of Madison, New Jer- 
sey, she attended St. Louis's Mary 
Institute and was a graduate of Vas- 
sar College. She was twice-widowed, 
having been married to Archie Laney 
Lee from 1925 until his death in 1950, 
and later to Arthur Corbett Hoskins 
until his death in 1962; both men were 
prominent advertising executives in 
St. Louis. 

The staff of the Garden expresses 
deepest sympathy to Mrs. Hoskins' 
family 



and paintings of the Flora of South Af- 
rica; and The Origins of Garden Plants. 
Members interested in seeing these 
volumes are reminded that the Garden's 
library is open on weekdays from 9 a.m. 
until 5 p.m 




Want to go somewhere? The Missouri 
Botanical Garden has four trips sched- 
uled for its Members during the fall of 
1983 and the winter and spring of 1984. 

• Japan (November 4-20) Led by 
Chairman of Horticulture Alan God- 
lewski, the tour will visit Tokyo, Mount 
Fuji. Okayama, Kyoto, and Osaka. An 
optional extension of the tour will visit 
Taipei and Hong Kong. For further in- 
formation consult the brochure mailed 
to you or call Travelers' Choice at 
961-5080 

• Far East Tour (January 19-Feb- 
ruary 6) Led by veteran traveler and 
Public Horticulture Specialist Steve 
Frowine, the tour will go to Hong Kong, 
Bangkok, Singapore, Jakarta, and 
Manila. Watch for the tour brochure or 
call Sante Travel at 726-3040 for infor- 
mation 

• Williamsburg-Alexandria (March, 
1984) It will be led by Jane Coultas, 
Manager of the Garden's historic 
Tower Grove House. Watch for details 
to be mailed soon 

• Italy (May, 1984) Again, watch for 
details to come; it will be led by Alan 
Godlewski 



The Missouri Concert Ballet Guild is 
sponsoring a benefit performance and 
cocktail party on Friday, September 30, 
at Missouri Botanical Garden. Proceeds 
will be donated to the ballet company, 
which is working toward expanding its 
1984 schedule. 

The benefit will be held at the Gar- 
den's new Ridgway Center, beginning at 
8 p.m. Tickets may be purchased for 
$17.50 each by calling Betty Schafer at 
878-5218 or Mary Ann Abrams at 878- 
5028. A portion of the ticket price is tax 
deductible. 

Co-chairpersons of the Guild benefit 
are Sonja DiPaolo and Bonnie Ferrell. 
Honorary co-chairpersons for the event 
are Dr. Peter H. Raven, Garden Director, 
Tamra Engelhorn Raven, and Catherine 
Comet, Exxon Arts Endowment Con- 
ductor of the St. Louis Symphony Or- 
chestra 



The Garden 's total membership reached 
16,000 in late spring, an increase of 
nearly 700 since January 1 . No other bo- 
tanical garden in the world has a mem- 
bership as large 







Lantern in place at the 1904 World's Fair 

In A Historical Light 

Visitors interested in history have 
always had much to see in the Garden, 
most notably the century-plus old build- 
ings left behind by the Garden's founder, 
Henry Shaw (Tower Grove House, the 
Linnean House, and the Museum, to 
name three). 

But in an area of the Garden that is 
not even a decade old are two artifacts 
with considerable historical significance. 

In the Japanese Garden (opened in 
1977) are two stone, snow-viewing lan- 
terns (yukimi-doro) that were part of the 
Japanese Garden at the 1904 World's 
Fair held in St. Louis. The lanterns, be- 
lieved to be several centuries old, were 
purchased from the Japanese govern- 
ment by Leonard Matthews following the 
close of the Fair on December 1, 1904. 
Matthews— a Garden trustee from 1895 
until 1923 — used the lanterns in his 
private garden until he donated them to 



the Garden in 1930 just prior to his death 
at age 102. He was co-founder of the 
first wholesale pharmaceutical company 
in St. Louis and, later, a co-founder of 
St. Louis' first brokerage firm. 

For many years, the lanterns were 
used as decorative props during flower 
shows — primarily for the annual chry- 
santhemum exhibits. Later, one of the 
lanterns was displayed — as it still is — 
near the entrance to the Japanese Gar- 
den, while the other was located outside 
the Floral Display House. This second 
lantern has recently been placed in the 
Japanese Garden by that garden's de- 
signer, Koichi Kawana, and can be 
found in the newly-developed area west 
of the Taikobashi-Drum Bridge. 

Matthew's granddaughter, Mary Weise, has 
been active as a Garden guide for a number of 

years. 




The Funsten Lantern (left), given in memory of 
Gladys McNair Funsten by Robert Lee Funsten, 
Elizabeth Oliver McCarthy, and Edward S. Funsten, 
placed recently near the Plum Viewing Arbor in the 
Japanese Garden 



The Garden's Public Horticulture Specialist Steve A. 
Frowine, was honored recently by the Land Reutiliza- 
tion Authority as a "Friend of the Agency." The 
Authority, a City of St. Louis agency, recognized Mr. 
Frowine's efforts in their Adopt-A-Lot program, 
which concentrates on beautifying and developing 
the more than 6,000 vacant city lots managed by 

the Authority 

7 



A Desert Dish Garden 

When young children visit the 
Garden, they are especially im- 
pressed with the plants inside the 
Climatron and the Desert House. 
The plants in these greenhouses do 
not normally grow outdoors in St. 
Louis. As a result, they are new dis- 
coveries for children, different and 
exciting. Your child can make a small 
desert dish garden containing plants 
that are easy to care for and that 
have unusual and interesting growth 
patterns. 

You will need: a shallow pan or 
saucer, approximately 9" x 13," or 
9" round; horticultural charcoal; 
gravel; sand; rocks; soil; a variety of 
cacti and succulents; scissors or 
plant shears; old newspaper. 

What to do: Show your child the 
cacti and succulents. The cacti are 
usually covered with spines for pro- 
tection, so caution will be needed in 
touching. What would happen if an 
animal came too close to the spines? 

Cut off a section of one of the 
plants so your child can see and feel 
the moisture inside. Cacti and succu- 
lents store water in their fleshy leaves 
and stems, which often given them 
odd but interesting shapes. 

Mix together the charcoal and 
gravel, and spread it on the bottom 
of the shallow pan or saucer. Add an- 
other Vh inches of soil. Carefully 
plant the cacti and succulents, using 
a piece of old newspaper to hold the 
cactus plants. Firm the soil around 
each plant. Sprinkle a thin layer of 
sand over the soil, and place a few 
rocks randomly for decoration. 
Water thoroughly, and then water 
only every two weeks. Place the 
desert garden in a sunny location. 
Observe and talk about the changes 
in plant growth, shape, or other 
characteristics over a period of 
weeks and months. 

—Ilcnc Follman 

Education Specialist 
8 




Hidden Treasure... 
at Shaw's Garden! 

"Look, the Climb-upon!" ex- 
claimed an eager young Garden vis- 
itor upon seeing the Climatron. And. 
indeed, the Climatron's tubular 
aluminum superstructure and its 
dome shape could easily represent a 
young climber's dream. This obser- 
vation is one of hundreds made each 
day by young children who visit the 
Garden. They often view living and 
non-living objects in a manner quite 
different from their adult compan- 
ions. 

The Garden's Education staff, in- 



tent on capturing the whimsical in- 
terpretations and moods of children, 
has designed a new Discovery Map of 
the Missouri Botanical Garden. In 
the manner of an old-fashioned trea- 
sure map, the Discover}' Map con- 
tains objects to look for. riddles to 
solve, and special activities to com- 
plete. One side of the map has been 
designed by children, whose draw- 
ings and written interpretations of a 
Garden visit are as fresh and creative 
as any the Education Department 
has seen or heard. The map has 
been heartily welcomed by young 
Garden visitors, and their adult com- 
panions seem to be equally delighted 
with it. 

How many Garden treasures do 
you know about? How many more 
can you discover? Find out by using 
the new Discovery Map as your 
guide. The map is available at the 
Ticket Counter for 25<L 




Discoveries You Can Make . . . 



When Sew City School's students visited the garden, they saw manu 
interesting things. Some of their drawings are on this page. How manu of 
them have you seen in the Garden? Which ones are plants? Which ones are 
animals? Which ones are structures? Next time you come to the Garden see 
if you can discover something you have not seen before. 



CALENDAR 



August 




The Climatron — a world famous landmark — is one of the finest examples 
of the geodesic dome form created by the late R. Buckminster Fuller. In 
September it features bromeliads. 



AUGUST 1-6 

August 6: 

AUGUST 7-13 

August 13: 

Continues: 

AUGUST 14-20 

Continues: 

AUGUST 21-27 

August 25-27: 

AUGUST 28-31 

August 28-31: 



Boehm Porcelain Flower Exhibit, Floral Display Hall, 
through August 19. The largest exhibit of porcelain flower 
sculpture ever open to the public. 



Winnie the Pooh, Shoenberg Auditorium, noon. Another 
in the series of Disney animated classic films. 

Boehm Porcelain Flower Exhibit 



Boehm Porcelain Flower Exhibit (Last Day, August 19) 



Midsummer Night Movies: Two delightful Hepburn and 
Grant classics for the price of one: Bringing Up Baby and 
Holiday. Shoenberg Auditorium, 8:00 p.m. 



Henry Shaw Cactus Society Show, Floral Display Hall. 
One of the most popular exhibits of the year at the 
Garden. 



September 



SEPTEMBER 1-10 

September 1: 



September 2-4: 

September 5: 
Continues: 

SEPTEMBER 11-17 

September 17: 

September 17-18: 
Continues: 

SEPTEMBER 18-24 

September 22-25: 

September 24-25: 
Continues: 

SEPTEMBER 26-30 

Continues: 



Calder in Retrospect, Ridgway Center, through Octo- 
ber 2. The first major St. Louis exhibit of the work of one 
of our century's greatest artists. 

Bromeliad Exhibit, Climatron, through September 30. 
The story goes that thirsty explorers in Florida were able 
to survive by drinking the water that these plants retained. 

Roses, Garden grounds, through September 30. An in- 
formative and beautiful exhibit of America's favorite 
flower 

Much Ado About Nothing. Theatre Project Company. 
Cohen Amphitheater. A comedy by the greatest play- 
wright of the last half-millenia performed in the world's 
greatest garden (Also on 9/8-11.) 

Labor Day/Family Picnic Day, Garden grounds Take 
the day off from laboring and enjoy the Garden. 

Henry Shaw Cactus Society Show (Last Day, Sep- 
tember 4). 



The Living Desert, a film. Shoenberg Auditorium, noon. 
A fascinating film about the drier places. 

Rose Weekend, Lehmann Rose Garden. Wine, music, 
candlelight tours — need we say more for you romantics? 

Calder in Retrospect 
Roses Exhibit 
Bromeliads Exhibit 



Plant Sale, Garden Gate Shop. Members save 20% on 
the finest plants in St Louis (watch your mail for details) 

Dahlia Society Show. Floral Display Hall. 
Calder in Retrospect 
Roses Exhibit 
Bromeliads Exhibit 



Calder in Retrospect 
Roses Exhibit 
Bromeliads Exhibit 



Classes 



CLASSES? SURE WE HAVE CLASSES. The fall schedule of classes and 
workshops begins in September Members will receive a brochure with 
details shortly. If you don 't receive one, or would like additional copies for 
distribution to friends or fellow garden-club members, contact the Education 
Department at 577-5140. The courses are listed below according to the date 
of the FIRST meeting (in the case of multiple-session courses); numbers in 
parentheses following the course title note the number of meetings of the 
class. All courses meet in the Ridgway Center unless they occur at the 
Arboretum; those at the Arboretum are marked (A). 



September 2 Evening Prairie Walk (A) 6-8:30 p.m. 

September 10 Dyeing with Natural Materials (2) (A) 9:30 a.m. 

3:30 p.m. 
Animals of the Meramec River Valley (A) 10 am. 

3 p.m. 



September 11 
September 12 

September 13 
September 14 
September 17 

September 20 

September 24 



September 27 



Haiku, the Garden, and You (2) 

Successful Lawn and Ground Covers (4) 7-9 p.m. 
Introduction to Ikebana (3) 

Preserving the Fall Harvest (2) 10 a.m. -noon 

Mediterranean Cooking (3) 6:30-8:30 p.m. 

Geology of the Meramec River Valley 10 a.m- 
3 p.m. 

Home Landscape Design (5) 7-9 p.m. 

Autumn Ramble (A) 9:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. 

Art of Chinese Brush Painting (6) 930-noon 
Birding at Horseshoe Lake 8 a.m. -2 p.m. 
Forests of the Meramec River Valley (A) 10 a.m- 
3 p.m. 
Equinox Celebration (A) 7:30-10:30 p.m. 

Autumn Ramble (A) 9:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. 



Biggs, McDonnell Elected as Trustees 




John H. Biggs 

At its June meeting, the Garden's 
Board of Trustees elected John H. Biggs 
and James S. McDonnell III as trustees. 

Mr. Biggs is Vice Chancellor for Ad- 
ministration and Finance at Washington 
University. He is also Chairman of the 
Board of Washington University Tech- 
nology Associates. Prior to joining the 




James S. McDonnell III 

University he was Vice President and 
Controller of General American Life In- 
surance Company. He holds an A.B. de- 
gree from Harvard College and will com- 
plete a Ph.D. in Economics from Wash- 
ington University this year. 

Mr. Biggs is Vice President and Trea- 
surer of St. Louis Arts and Education 



Profiles in Service 




William R Orthwein. Jr 



When one talks of the Missouri Bo- 
tanical Garden one usually comments 
on the gardens, the flowers, the fine 
examples of Victorian architecture; com- 
mon adjectives or phrases may be 
"beautiful," "tranquil" or "stunning." 
But when William R. Orthwein, Jr., talks 
of the Garden he makes reference to 
"careful management," "responsibly" 
and "public trust." Oh, do not make the 
mistake of thinking that he cannot ap- 
preciate the Garden's aesthetic qual- 
ities, because he also uses the phrase, 
"a place of joy and beauty" in describ- 
ing the Garden. 

For the last eight years — since 1975 
— he has served as a member of the 
Garden's Board of Trustees; since 1980 
he has been First Vice President. When 
he talks about his role as a trustee, and 
that of the Board in general, he stresses 
that he is a trustee, not a director. "We 
have a responsibility to see that the pur- 
10 



poses laid out in Henry Shaw's will are 
carried out, but we also are responsible 
to the community. The Board has been 
entrusted with the task of seeing that the 
Garden performs in a sound manner 
and that its resources are properly 
used," he says. "Everyone associated 
with the Garden faces a great challenge 
to make this botanical garden the 
world's finest." 

Mr. Orthwein is one of those rare and 
extremely valuable individuals who bring 
extensive business ability and experi- 
ence and applies it, largely unpubli- 
cized, to work in the community to im- 
prove the quality of life for the area's 
entire population. He was hesitant that 
this profile even be written. "All of the 
Trustees would agree with me that we 
do not do this work for the publicity; we 
don't seek the notoriety," he says. "But 
the members and the people of the com- 
munity should know to what sort of men 
and women they have entrusted the Gar- 
den. It's one of the most important insti- 
tutions in the community." 

Mr. Orthwein is the retired President 
and Chairman of McDonnell Douglas 
Automation Company, and is a Director 
of McDonnell Douglas Corporation; he 
joined the corporation in 1942. In addi- 
tion to the Missouri Botanical Garden, 
he has been involved with a number of 
other community and cultural organiza- 
tions and is currently a member of the 
Board of Directors of the St. Louis Sym- 
phony Society, St. Louis Council of the 
Boy Scouts of America, and The St. 
Louis Development Corporation. He has 

(continued on page 1 1) 



Fund, and a director of Centerre Trust 
Co. and of Mark Twain Institute. He has 
also been Chairman of the Finance 
Committee of the Missouri Coordinating 
Board for Higher Education. 

His mother, Lillian Biggs, has been 
associated with the Garden as an an- 
swer service volunteer since 1979. 

Mr. McDonnell is Corporate Vice 
President-Marketing and a Director of 
McDonnell Douglas Corporation. He 
joined the Corporation in 1963 as an 
aerodynamics engineer and holds a 
M.S. in Aeronautical Engineering from 
the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology (MIT). 

He is a member of the Board of Cen- 
terre Trust Co., Washington University 
Medical Center, Mary Institute, St. Louis 
Children's Hospital, and The St. Louis 
Art Museum. He is also a member of the 
Executive Committee of United Way of 
Greater St. Louis, and served as Chair- 
man of the highly successful 1983 Arts 
and Education Fund Drive. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

C C Johnson Spink. President 

William R Orthwein. Jr., First Vice-President 

Robert R. Hermann. Sr . , Second Vice-President 

Mr. Clarence C Barksdale 
Mr. Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. John H. Biggs 

Mr William H. T. Bush 

Mr Robert E. Kresko 

Mr. Stephen H Loeb 

Mr. William E. Mantz 

Mr James S. McDonnell III 

Mrs Vernon W. Piper 
Mrs Lucianna Gladney Ross 

Mr Louis S. Sachs 
Dr Howard A. Schneiderman 

Mr. Warren M Shapleigh 

Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr 

Mr. Tom K. Smith, Jr. 

Mr. John K. Wallace. Jr 

Mr. Robert C West 

Mr Harry E Wuertenbaecher, Jr. 

EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Mr Howard F Baer 

Mr Sam'l C Davis 

Dr. Thomas S. Hall 

Mr. Henry Hitchcock 

Mr A Timon Primm III 

Mr. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Robert Brookings Smith 



EX OFFICIO TRUSTEES 

Mrs. Paul Alcott 
President, St Louis Board of Education 

Mr. Jules D. Campbell 

President, St Louis Academy of Science 

Dr. William H. Danforlh 

Chancellor, Washington University 

The Rev Thomas R. Fitzgerald, S.J. 

President. St Louis University 

The Rt. Rev. Wm A Jones, Jr. 

Episcopal Bishop of Missouri 

The Honorable Vincent C. Schoemehl. Jr 

Mayor, City of St. Louis 



Our New Commissioners 





Mar/one M. Weir 

Frederick S. Wood, Vice Chairman (Ap- 
pointed by County Executive McNary) 

Frederick S. Wood and his family 
first came into contact with the Missouri 
Botanical Garden in 1977, even before 
they moved to the St. Louis community. 
Passing through the city on their way to 
a vacation to Colorado, they stopped to 
visit the country's oldest botanical gar- 
den. Mr. Wood was impressed with what 
he saw. 

Because of that first impression, and 
those from subsequent visits to the Gar- 
den, he was pleased for the opportunity 
for a formal connection with the Garden, 
made possible when County Executive 
McNary asked him to serve as a com- 




Seated, left to right: Mrs. James S. McDonnell, Mrs. David C Farrell, Ms. Sandra Bennett, C. C. Johnson Spink (President of Garden's Board of 
Trustees), Ms Doris Moore-Glenn, Mr. Robert M. Sunnen, and Ms. Cody Kieffer Standing, left to right: Mr. Earl Wipfler (Administrative Secretary to the Zoo- 
Museum Board), Mr. Bourne Bean (Counsel to the Zoo-Museum Board), and behind him. Mr. Frederick S Wood, Mr. Hal Kroeger (President of the Zoo- 
Museum Board), Mr. George H. Walker III. Dr. Peter H. Raven (Director of the Garden), Ms. MaqorieM. Weir, Mr. Richard Daley (Director of Public Programs 
for the Garden), Ms. Deborah Edwards, and Mr. Frank P. Wolff (Counsel for the Garden). 

On April 5, 1983, voters in the City 
and County of St. Louis approved a 
measure creating a Botanical Garden 
Subdistrict of the eleven-year-old Zoo- 
Museum District. Through the Subdis- 
trict the Missouri Botanical Garden will 
benefit from a property tax of up to 4C 
per $100 assessed valuation, providing 
the Garden with a stable financial base 
for operation. In the next several issues, 
we will offer our readers an opportunity 
to meet the ten commissioners who will 
govern the Subdistrict. Five of the com- 
missioners were appointed by the Mayor 
of the City of St. Louis, Vincent C. 
Schoemehl; five were appointed by St. 
Louis County Executive, Gene McNary. 

Marjorie M. Weir, Chairman of the Com- 
mission (Appointed by Mayor Schoe- 
mehl) 

Marjorie M. Weir is no stranger to the 
Missouri Botanical Garden nor to the 
service of the St. Louis community. 
From October, 1980, until October, 
1981, she served as an ex officio mem- 
ber of the Garden's Board of Trustees, 
by virture of her position as President of 
the St. Louis Board of Education; she 
was a member of the Board of Educa- 
tion for six years, from 1977 until 1983. 
Her interest in education — one of the 
Missouri Botanical Garden's primary ac- 
tivities — is apparent from her member- 
ship also on the Board of the Confer- 
ence on Education and the Board of the 
Scholarship Foundation. She was also a 
teacher, for 5 1 /2 years, at Brittany Junior 
High School in University City, as well as 
an instructor in the University City Con- 
tinuing Education program. 



Frederick S Wood 

missioner of the Botanical Garden Sub- 
district of the Zoo-Museum District. 

Currently Corporate Vice President, 
Contracts and Pricing, of General Dy- 
namics — a position he has held since 
August, 1978 — Mr. Wood spent 17 years 
in government service, lastly as Inter- 
national Business Advisor for the F16 at 
the United States Air Force Aeronautical 
Systems Division at Wright-Patterson Air 
Force Base in his native Dayton, Ohio. In 
addition to his work as Subdistrict Com- 
missioner, he is on the Board of Direc- 
tors of the St. Louis Arts and Education 
Council, the Coro Foundation, and the 
Urban League. He is also a trustee of his 
alma mater, the University of Dayton. 



Profiles in Service (continued from page 10) 

also been a commissioner of the Zoolog- 
ical Park Subdistrict of the St. Louis Zoo- 
Museum District and Director of the Mis- 
souri Historical Society. Mr. Orthwein 
also serves on the Board of Directors of 



Mercantile Bancorporation and of the 
Mercantile Trust Company. His support, 
with that of his wife, Laura Rand Orth- 
wein, also was responsible for the cre- 
ation of the Floral Display Hall in the 
Ridgway Center. 

11 




Joan Murphy (left) and Arden Fisher, in 
the last eight months, have walked over 
perhaps every square foot of the Garden 
and, through archival documents, been 
over every year of the Garden's 124- 
year history. 

As volunteers in the Development 
office, they are working on special proj- 
ects relating to the commemorative do- 
nations made to the Garden. Their most 
important duty is to assist members and 
others who are interested in making con- 
tributions to commemorate significant 
events and people. They spend much of 
their time touring people through the 
Garden grounds to find suitable me- 
morials. 

"We became interested in this work 
when I contacted the Garden to make a 
contribution in memory of Joan's hus- 
band," Mrs. Fisher said. "I saw all the 
time spent by the staff in showing me 
through the Garden to find a tree that I 
thought was suitable as a memorial to 
her husband; it was a tremendous 
amount of time." 

One task they have undertaken is 
the compilation of a complete list of 
every fountain, bench, plant collection, 
building, and tree that has been donated 
in honor of a birthday, death, anniver- 
sary. And they have uncovered some in- 
teresting footnotes for many of the con- 
tributions, from a donation in the 1940s 
of Philippian orchids by the Honorable 
Dwight F. Davis who then was the Gov- 
ernor General of the Philippines and 
who instituted tennis' Davis Cup in 1900, 
to the World's Fair lanterns given by 
one-time Garden trustee Leonard Mat- 
thews (see page 7 ), to a set of 12 cal- 
ligraphy panels held in the Garden's 
archives. Those panels were given to 
the Garden in 1977 by Mrs. Ruth Kacho, 
wife of the grandson of Prince Fushimi 
who visited the World's Fair held in 
St. Louis in 1904 and who created the 
panels following his visit. 

Mrs. Murphy and Mrs. Fisher have 
been working every Tuesday since they 
began, but also are available on call if 
interested persons are unable to come 

to the Garden on Tuesdays 

12 



Volunteers and Excellence 

Last year, more than 500 dedicated 
people donated a total of 41,000 hours 
as volunteers at the Missouri Botanical 
Garden. They worked in all areas of the 
Garden, from mounting plants in the 
herbarium to propagating plants to 
woodworking, teaching, and book resto- 
ration. At the annual volunteer evening, 
June 15, three of these people were 
honored as outstanding volunteers of 
the year. 

Adam Donges — an Arboretum vol- 
unteer since 1980— received the award 
for achievement, in recognition of the 
many special projects he has completed 
in the Arboretum. Adam built a 4-har- 
ness loom for weaving, a very compli- 
cated woodworking project. He also built 
a guest book stand for the Visitors Cen- 
ter. He has made wooden bowls and 
spoons used in education programs. He 
has done a taxidermy job on a hawk for 
display in the Visitors Center. He has 
also made windows, doors, tables and 
chairs, a wooden rake, 8 table looms, 
dozens of ax handles and repaired walls 
at a log cabin used for education pro- 
grams. In all, he gave 1,000 hours this 
year on volunteer projects. He also vol- 
unteered with the prairie project — i.e. he 
assisted with the prairie burn and trans- 
planting of seedlings. 

The award for special services went 
to Mary Wahl, a volunteer in the library's 
book preservation department since 
1973. For the past 10 years Mary has de- 
voted her efforts in the library bindery to 
restoring leather-bound rare books. This 
type of work requires a great deal of skill 
and dedication. Her work schedule con- 




sists of two days a week throughout the 
year. All her work will meet professional 
standards of the bookbinding craft. 

The third award, that for commit- 
ment, was presented to Maurita Stuek, 
a volunteer since 1973 in the Education 
Department. She has served as a Guide, 
including the term as Guide Chairman; 
she initiated the Volunteer Instructor 
Program and recently completed a term 
as Instructor Coordinator; she estab- 
lished an outreach program taking pro- 
grams to Senior Citizens; and she 
served as a resource person for the Mid- 
west Museum Conference program, 
"Volunteers: Profiles for the '80s." 

— Jeanne McGilligan 
Coordinator of Volunteers 




Mary Wahl 



Maunta Stuek 




The Latzer Fountain 

Aside from its gardens, horticultural 
displays, and historic buildings, the Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden is also popular 
with its nearly half-million annual visitors 
for its fountains. Children enjoy playing 
with the ever-changing water levels of 
the Shapleigh Fountain located at the 
northern end of the Anne L. Lehmann 
Rose Garden. Others are grateful for a 
restful few moments sitting on the wall 
beside the cascading Shoenberg Foun- 
tain between the Lehmann Building and 
the Administration Building. 

The newest fountain in the Garden is 
the Robert Louis Latzer Fountain lo- 
cated in the center of the Spoehrer 
Plaza (see article at right). It is the focal 
point of the visitor's entrance into the 
exterior Garden. Like the curve 

in the three walls of the Plaza the Foun- 
tain's spray is engineered to reflect both 
the arc of the Ridgway Center's barrel 
vault and the curves of the windows in 
the century-old Linnean House. 

The Latzer Fountain is named in 
memory of Robert Louis Latzer who, 
before his death in 1974, was President 
and Chairman of the Board of Pet, Inc. 
which he joined in the 1920s. According 
to his daughter, Mrs. John L. Donnell, 
the Fountain was an appropriate me- 
morial to the late Mr. Latzer because of 
his interest in the Missouri Botanical 
Garden — late in his life, he visited the 
Garden almost every week. He was also 
interested in plants, particularly the culti- 
vation of dogwoods. 

Besides the Garden, he was also in- 
volved in the University of Illinois and the 
public library in his hometown of High- 
land, Illinois— the Louis Latzer Public 
Library, named in honor of his father. 




The Spoehrer Plaza 

The first area visitors enter after leav- 
ing the Ridgway Center is the 1,300 
square-foot Spoehrer Plaza, named in 
memory of Hermann F. Spoehrer. Its 
most prominent features are the Robert 
Louis Latzer Fountain (see article at left) 
and an inner perimeter formed by Ken- 
tucky coffeetrees and other plantings, 
including dwarf cranberry bushes, dwarf 
holly, and seasonal flowers. 

With its brickwork, benches, plant- 
ings, and fountain, the Plaza presents 
an attractive area for visitors in which to 
rest or stroll, but its creation presented 
its designers (Environmental Planning 
and Design) with some unique prob- 
lems, principally: how to create an area 
that would be a suitable transition be- 
tween the modern structure, the Ridg- 
way Center, and the surrounding Gar- 
den, which was created more than 100 
years ago, created even before the Civil 
War. The first building that visitors walk- 
ing onto the Plaza would see was the 
Linnean House, built in a time even 
before Edison's electric light was in 
common use. Like the Ridgway Center 
itself, the Spoehrer Plaza had to provide 
a link with the Garden's rich past as well 
as a continuation of the Garden's 



tradition. 

The solution arrived at by designers 
at E.P.D. can give those of us who are 
not designers an interesting insight into 
both the design statement made by the 
Plaza through its various elements (like 
the words, phrases, and clauses of a 
sentence, the individual parts of a gar- 
den or a building combine to "state" an 
idea that is greater than the mere sum of 
its elements) as well as the process used 
by the designers in the creation of the 
Spoehrer Plaza. 

The use of brick in the Plaza pro- 
vides a visual transition between the 
very modern Ridgway Center and the 
historic (and brick) Linnean House. 

The most interesting point about the 
Plaza, however, are the curves in the 
south, east, and west walls. These were 
designed to reflect both the curve in the 
center barrel vault of the Ridgway Cen- 
ter and the curved windows of the Lin- 
nean House. 

Hermann F. Spoehrer, in memory of 
whom the Plaza is named, was a St. 
Louis engineer who was deeply com- 
mitted to the St. Louis community. He 
was especially interested and involved in 
Junior Achievement, and the engineer- 
ing school at Washington University. 



New 


Dr. Jayne Burks 
Joseph Burmester 


Louis Ebbesmeyer 
Ralph Ecoff 


Members 


Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Cabal 
Willis S Cady 


Karen Edwards 

Mr. and Mrs Andrew Efthim 




C.A -J L, Inc. 


Margaret Eggleston 


July, 1983 


John Calhson 


Edwin J Eller 




M. D Campbell 


Mr. Tom Ellsworth 


Contributing Members 


William J Casey 


Mr. and Mrs A R Emmerth 


Miss Alice J. Adcock 


Robert E Cearnal 


Mrs. Henry Farmer 


Mr Joseph F Adlon 


Larry Claunch 


Jean E Fine 


Mr D L Alexander 


Mr John Cleary 


Patrick C. Fitzgerald 


Amighetti Bakery 


Mr and Mrs Stanley M Cohen 


Jane Floyd 


Mr. Guy M. Ancell 


Mr. Ronnie L. Coleman 


Dr. Thomas Follis 


Jeanne A Anderson 


Gladys Conway 


Robert N Fox 


Cecelia C Aubuchon 


Mr Robert L. Corbett 


Mr Timothy Gammon 


Miss Elaine Baker 


Mrs Atkins Con 


Mr. Dennis Gatlin 


Joseph P. Bannister 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert H Cram 


Mr and Mrs. William H. Gatlin 


Mrs. B. E Barman 


Mane K. Cummmgs 


General Credit Forms. Inc. 


Olivia J. Bauer 


Rose Dawson 


Nancy Boos Georgen 


Mike Bendall 


Mr Leroy T. Deaton 


Mr Carl Goering 


Mrs. Karl M. Block. Jr. 


Mary Desemone 


The Gold Stamp Company 


Wallace Bonham 


Mr Jim Dickinson 


Mr Everett C. Gray 


Mrs. Elvera Bradburn 


Dr. Ronald W. Dillow 


Mr Leo Green 


Eric Brimer 


Richard A Dix 


Mr and Mrs Paul H. Greenlaw 


Broeg Chevrolet Company 


Carl Doerr 




Frances V Brown 


William N Durland 


(continued on page 14) 



13 



New Members 


Mildred F Lucas 


Mr and Mrs 


. James Robertson 


(continued from page 13) 


C. K. Lueck 


Einar S. Ross 




Mr. Bruce B. MacLachlan 


Susan Rouvalis 


Mr Joseph J Gummersbach 


Marian A. Marquard 


Miss Marie Rutlin 


Mr. and Mrs Oren K. Hargrove, Jr. 


Marquette Tool and Die Company 


Ms. Patricia Ryan 


Dr Norberl H Hartenbach 


Mr and Mrs. Theodore R P. Martin 


Edward Saffel 


Richard Heinecke 


Robert A. Maschal 


Lawrence Sather 


Dr. Patrick H Henry 


Ms Laura McCanna 


Mr. and Mrs. J. Scaglione 


Dolores Henson 


Mr. and Mrs. William W. McCurdy 


Thomas C. Scherer 


Mr Fred W. Herzer 


Frank McDaniels 


Mrs. Marian A Schulte 


Nancy E Hickey 


Shirley Mertens 


Mr. and Mrs. Gary Scott 


Mr and Mrs. William A. Hillench 


Mr and Mrs Patrick J Meyers 


P. D Searles 


Mrs. Max E Hodges 


Midwest Refrigeration Service & 


Mr. and Mrs. James H. Senger 


Delilah Hoffman 


Supply Company. Inc 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Serrano 


Paul Holdener 


Elizabeth Miller 


Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Shater 


Mr. Melvin W Hood 


Mr. and Mrs John C. Miller 


Kathy Sheehan 


Mr Alan S Howard 


Mr. Terrance W. Miller 


Dr. John Sheridan 


Roger Huff 


Mr. and Mrs. Donald H. Milster 


Richard W Shomaker 


Lois B. Huxel 


Virginia R. Moehlenpah 


Mr and Mrs. Harold J. Shoults 


Dennis C Jacknewitz 


Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Mohl 


Mr. Joseph E Simon, Jr. 


Mr. Peter W D. Jensen 


Mr. and Mrs. Howard M. Monroe 


Ms Martha E. Sittner 


Vera Jones 


G. W. Muehlemann 


Dr Chotchai Srisuro 


Mr and Mrs. E. L. Kaiser, Jr. 


Douglas Mulleman 


Mr and Mrs. Karl Steenberg 


Ms Rosemary Karpowicz 


Aune P. Nelson 


Marcia Sterneck 


Mr and Mrs. George A Keller 


Mr James D. Newell 


Beulah Stevens 


Cedona Kendall 


Henry G. Ollinger 


Mrs L B. Stiegemeyer 


Mrs. Kallie Kirchberg 


Mr and Mrs. George E Pake 


Mr and Mrs. John E. Strain 


Mr Ray Kirkpatrick 


Mr Melvin Palkes 


Ms. Patricia A. Straussner 


Dorothy Kleine 


Barbara Perrigo 


Ella Swierkosz 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert H Kleine 


Lynn Phelps 


Dr. and Mrs. Gordon C Thompson 


Mane Krug 


Dr. and Mrs. Steven P. Pisoni 


Nancy Townsend 


Mr. and Mrs Robert L Lane 


Mr. and Mrs. John H. Powell 


Mr. and Mrs. William Tunney, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs Roy T Langenberg 


Linda C Pryor 


Gail L Upchurch 


Mr and Mrs Nathan G Lauderdale 


Joseph P. Racher 


Dr and Mrs Andres J Valdes 


Mr Arthur G. Lee 


Lillian B. Raithel 


Alfred Von Fange 


Mr Joe Leuantino 


Mrs Carlos Reese 


Dorothy Vondrasek 


Mr Graves W. Lile 


A. C. Reichert 


Dolores Waser 


Dr Lewis Littmann 


Mrs. Georgiann Reynolds 


Ricky Webb 


Robert M Lobrano 


Mrs. David Riesmeyer 


Marlene Weinland 


Mr Joe Lombardi 


Mr and Mrs. Paul W Robberson 


Wilfrid Werges 


Increased 


Mrs. Elizabeth R. Dodds 
Ms. Mary J. Erwm 


Mr. Ronald T. O'Connor 

Mr and Mrs. Everett Osterloh 


Support 


Ms and Mrs. Peter S. Eyermann 


Ozark Zen Institute 


Mr. and Mrs. Edgar T, Farmer 


Mr. and Mrs. J. M, Palacek 


JL JL 


Dr and Mrs T. J. Fowler 


Mr Irving L. Paskowitz 




Mrs. Carolyn Freund 


Mrs. F. H. Potter 




Harvey E Friedman 


Mrs. Paul T Putzel 


Contributing Members 


Mrs Florence M. Gabanski 


Mr. and Mrs Alan Quentm 


Mrs James M Adams 


Dr and Mrs. Ronald J. Gaskin 


Mr. and Mrs. Michael Rad 


Mr and Mrs. Victor R. Ahrens 


Mr. Ronald G. Gerdes 


Mr. and Mrs Phillip Rashbaum 


Mr Dale Albers 


Mr. and Mrs. William F. Gerhard 


Ravanno & Freschi, Inc. 


Mr and Mrs Ronald G. Alderfer 


Mr. Ron Glenn 


Ms. Jackie Reed 


Mr. and Mrs. Harold D Altis 


Ms Dorothy E. Goebelt 


David Reitz 


Mr Clyde Anderson 


Sheila Greenbaum 


Mr. and Mrs A. W Rengel 


Mr Edwin Antle 


Ms Margaret Groh 


Mr. and Mrs. Yuki Rikimaru 


Judith A Bachman 


Valle Grossman 


Mrs. Michael Riley 


Ms Hildreth C Bailey 


Mr and Mrs Harry Hacker 


Mr Caesar L Rossi 


Mr and Mrs Andrew R. Baldassare 


Mr. Henry F. Hafner 


Mr and Mrs. David Royce 


Mr and Mrs Henry J Bangert 


Ms. Jennifer Hammond 


Ms Better Sauerburger 


Ms. Cathy Barton 


Mr and Mrs. Edwin K. Harman 


Mrs. Elmer P. Schluer 


Mr Ralph A. Bauer 


Mr. Forrest E. Head 


Dr. Melissa M. Sedlis 


Mr. and Mrs. G D. Bauman 


Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Heger 


Mr. William Sedlock 


Mr David Becher 


Mr and Mrs. Martin J. Hennessey 


Mr. and Mrs. A J Seewoester 


Dr. and Mrs Edward T Becker 


Mr Michael Herich 


Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Sienaski 


Mr Norman Becker 


Dr and Mrs William H Huffaker 


Mr and Mrs. Thomas A Skokut 


Lawrence F Behymer 


Mr and Mrs. Robert H. Hughes 


Mr and Mrs. Glenn L. Smith 


Mr Kevin P. Blansit 


Mr and Mrs Stifel W. Jens 


Mr and Mrs Harold L. Smith 


David A Blanton III 


Mr Roland E. Jester 


Mr and Mrs. Kirby Smith 


Miss Ruth A Breckenndge 


Ms. P. A Kahn 


Mr. and Mrs Martin Smith 


Mr and Mrs. Ernest A. Brooks II 


Mr. Sylvan Kaplan 


Miss Nadeene Snowhill 


Mrs Trudy Busch 


Mr. and Mrs Joseph Klausner 


Mr and Mrs John Solodar 


Ms Margaret Cady 


Mr. and Mrs Newell S. Knight. Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs 


Marvin L. Speer 


Ms Kay Campbell 


Mrs. B. Lammert 


Mr and Mrs 


William J. Stadtlander 


Mr and Mrs Gregory Carey 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Layne 


Mr. and Mrs 


Malcolm Sterner 


Ms Sophie E Carpenter 


Helga Lunsford 


Mr. and Mrs 


W C. Sullivan 


Mrs. Eileen Clanton 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard L Maxwell 


Mr. and Mrs 


Daniel A. Talonn 


Mr and Mrs Marc Cleven 


Margie W. May 


Mr. and Mrs 


Michael J. Trout 


Mr and Mrs. David E. Clukey 


Mr. and Mrs. L. L. McCourtney 


Mr. and Mrs 


Michael Wanner 


Mrs. Wendy E Cooke 


Mr. and Mrs. James L McCutchen 


Howard J. Wilkinson. Jr. 


Sander Coovert 


Mr. and Mrs. James K. Mellow 


Mr and Mrs. Carl R, Young 


Mr. and Mrs Kenneth D Cox 


Mr. and Mrs Randall Mennett 


Dr and Mrs. Jack Zuckner 


Ms Florence C Crancer 


Mr. and Mrs. Garry E Moeller 




Mrs Clare A Crenshaw 


Dr. and Mrs John L Morns 


Sustaining Members 


Ms B E DeCaulp 


Mr and Mrs. Randall E. Moyle 


Dr. and Mrs. Walter F. Ballinger II 


Mr and Mrs Ray DeHart 


Dr and Mrs. Daniel J. Murphy 


Mr. and Mrs Carl H. Barthold 


Mr. Anthony M. Demichele 


Dr David M Near 


Mr. Kenneth R Bender 


Mrs. Fannie Dennis 


Dr and Mrs R. A. Nussbaum 


Mr and Mrs. Stanley C. Blumenthal 


Mrs. Edward W. H. Dieckmann 


Ms. Barbara O'Brien 


Mr. and Mrs. Carl Bohl 



Ms. Mary P. Whitcraft 

Kathryn White 

Mrs. Vernon A. Wilkening 

Mr. Dick Willis. Jr. 

Ms. Rita J. Wilson 

Ms. Myrtle Winfield 

Greg Young 

Mr Robert Young 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L Young 

Gloria A. Zeller 

Sustaining Members 

Mr Henry Belz III 

Mrs J. W. Beneke 

Mr. and Mrs John Burd 

Richard Casey 

Mr. and Mrs Howard Cohen 

Dr. Salvatore Conti 

Mrs. D. W Eades 

Linda Engelland 

Mrs. Gail H. Hafer 

Mr. Lewis T. Hardy 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M Hart 

Leopoldme Hukenbeck 

International Brotherhood of 

Electrical Workers 
R R Kinyon 
James W. McLaughlin 
Lee Moisio 
Audrey Wallace Otto 
Rockwell International 
Karel R Schubert 
Esther M. Shoults 
Mrs. Samuel T. Woods 
Harry Wunderlich 

Sponsoring Members 

Chemtech Industries. Inc 
Loy-Lange Box Company 
Mr. and Mrs Sewell A. McMillan 



Mr. and Mrs Robert H. Buck 

Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Charpiot 

Mr Edward Collins 

Mr. and Mrs Charles J Cook 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Daulton 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dubinsky 

Miss Ann T Eakes 

Mrs. Lindell Gordon. Jr. 

Mr. Darin Groll 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hansen 

Mr. and Mrs. Irwin R. Harris 

Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Humphreys 

Mr. Daniel W. Jasper 

Mr. William Keslar 

Mr. Dennis M Laws 

Mr and Mrs Floyd F. Lewis 

Dr and Mrs Francis X Lieb 

Mr. and Mrs. J N MacDonough 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Martin, Jr. 

Dr and Mrs. R. Joseph Oik 

Dr and Mrs Paul M Packman 

Mr and Mrs Kenneth O Peck 

Mr. and Mrs J A Peterson 

Mrs Thomas Pettus 

Mr. David Smuckler 

Mr. and Mrs Louis Stark 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence E. Stout, Jr. 

Mrs H. T Tankersley 

Mr. and Mrs. James C Thompson. Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. William A Van Hook 

Mr. and Mrs. John Wiley 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Winter 

Sponsoring Members 

Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Barnes II 

Mr. and Mrs. John Brodhead, Jr. 

Mr, and Mrs. Laurance L Browning, Jr 

Coin Acceptors, Incorporated 

Mr. and Mrs. George Faux 

Dr. and Mrs Louis Fernandez 

Mr. and Mrs Stanley F Huck 

Mrs Elsie I Johnston 

Mr and Mrs. Kenneth N Kermes 

Mr. and Mrs S J Nissenbaum 

Mr and Mrs John Rapko 

Dr. and Mrs Robert G Scheibe 

Mr. and Mrs W. F. Schierholz 

Mr. and Mrs. John C Steger 



14 



Tributes 

May-June 1983 
IN HONOR OF: 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Mrs. Milton H. Tucker 

Mrs. Jane Marie Baker 

Frances Fleit 

Mr. and Mrs. William Hoxie 

Bixby, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. William H. T. Bush 
Mr. and Mrs. William Van Cleve 
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Crawford 
Mrs Anna Agris 
Mrs. Henry P. Day 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvard Hecker 
Sally and Steven Erlanger 
Mr and Mrs. Leon H. Zeve 
Mr. John Gallop 
Mr, and Mrs. Richard B. Rosenthal 
Olga and Louis Herman 
Alma M. Schaeperkoetter 
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Hirsch 
Mr. and Mrs Lester Adelson 
Carla Lange 
Mrs Mary A. Gamble 
Mr. Steve Lowy 
Mrs. Louis W. Rubin 
Mr. Carroll Nelson 
Mr. and Mrs. David S. Hooker 
Connie Orchard 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Rosenthal 
Mr. Charles Orner 
Mr. and Mrs. Sydney M 

Shoenberg, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Popham 
Miss Marian Barnholtz 
Marge Purk 
Mrs. Mary A. Gamble 
Dr. and Mrs. Harry Rosenbaum 
Mr. and Mrs. Lester Adelson 
Mr. Julian G. Samuels 
Mrs. J. A. Jacobs 
Helen C. Maurer 
Mrs. Joseph Schweich, Jr. 
Mr and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 
Glenda Seldin 

Mr. and Mrs Richard B. Rosenthal 
Mr. Harry Sparks 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred J. Steiner 
Miss Irma Haeseler 
Mr. and Mrs. Orval Sutter 
Yolanda N. Wanek 
Lucille and Roman Beuc 
Nieces, nephews, and their spouses 
The Garden Club 
Thelma Meaux. President 
Mr. and Mrs. David R. 

Townsend 
Mr. and Mrs. H. M Talcoff 
Vernon Wendt 
Jeanne and Lester Adelson 

IN MEMORY OF: 

Mrs. Stephen S. Adams, Jr. 

The Russell Meyers Family 

Pat Williamson 

Mrs. Nita Aston 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakm, Jr. 

Mr. Newell A. Augur 

Mrs. T. S. McPheeters 

Raymond J. Azar 

Milton L. Daugherty 

Mrs. Sommer Baker 

Mrs. Fielding T. Childress 

Mrs. John Berdau 

Mrs T S McPheeters 

Lucille R. Beuc 

Mr. Edward Sentuna 

Mrs. Elaine Bono 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Silverstein 



Mr. William Bramman 

Alexander and Elizabeth Bakewell 
Mrs. Emmet Carter 

Alexander and Elizabeth Bakewell 

Carroll F. Cash 

Dorothy McKmley and George 

Mr. Grover Crisp 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Allman 

Mrs. John Critchfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Rosenthal 

Amelia Overall Davis 

Mr and Mrs. Edwin S. Baldwin 

Mr, and Mrs. Joseph Bascom 

Mr Henry Belz III 

Mr. John R. Belz 

Mrs. Samuel F. Gordon 

Mr Michael L. Hanley 

Mr. Ben F. Jackson 

Mr. and Mrs James Lee Johnson 

Dr. and Mrs. Douglas R. Lilly 

Howard and Dorothy Lurier 

Mr. William A. McDonnell 

Dr and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 

Mr. and Mrs William N. Robertson 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar L. Taylor 

Mrs. William B. Weaver 

William and Judith Weaver 

Mr. Eugene F. Williams. Jr. 

Mrs. Dorothy Steele Emert 

Mr. and Mrs. George Barnes, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs. Roland C. Behrens 

Anne and Alan Frankel 

Mr and Mrs J. Robert Ryland 

Mrs. Hazel Farney 

Maryann Antoine 

Joan. Tim and Ruel Murphy 

Mr. and Mrs. Lowell R. Smith 

Cecile G Stubbs 

Max and Nan Weaver 

Father Dittenhafer's Mother 

Barry and Sheryl Famtich 

Echeal Feinstein 

Clarissa and Ray Lippert 

Mr. Charles R. Flachmann 

Mr. and Mrs James Hudson Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Willert. Jr. 

Mrs. Hortense Frank 

Mrs. Herbert Frank 

Ethel Fuchs 

Dorothy McKmley and George 

Mrs. Gladys M. Funsten 

Mr. Edward S. Funsten, Jr. 

Mr Robert Lee Funsten 

Elizabeth O. McCarthy 

Mrs W Gillespie Moore 

Mr. Robert P. Willing and Family 

Ruth Leventhal Goldman 

Charles H Bland 

Mr. Stephen Gould 

Mrs G R. Pilkington 

Mrs. Jerry Wightman 

Mrs. Blanche Grosz 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Haack 

Etta Gudhaus 

Virginia Jones 

Louise M. Haller 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin M Meinberg 

Mrs. C. D. P. Hamilton, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs W R Orthwein, Jr. 

Ruth Langley Hamilton 

Dr. and Mrs. James Donahoe 

Mrs. Gertrude Hardie 

Flower Arrangers Circle 

Forsythia Garden Club 

Yolanda N Wanek 

Mrs. Elinor Townsend Hayward 

Elaine and Frank Afton 

Virginia Campbell 

Mildred Depping 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Duval 

Mrs. Nellie S. Ferguson 

Mrs. Christine B. Goltermann 

Helen C Kelley 

Clarissa and Ray Lippert 

Miss Marjone Mullins 



Marprie Rhoten 

Miss Virginia Rosenmeyer 

St. Louis Board of Education 

Audiovisual Services 
Mrs. Mildred Henry 
Flower Arrangers Circle 
Mrs. Fred Hermann, Sr. 
Mr. Edward S Funsten. Jr 
Mrs. Arthur Hoskins 
Alexander and Elizabeth Bakewell 
Mrs. K. H. Bitting 
Mr and Mrs. Ingram Boyd 
Mr and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 
Mrs. Suzanne Shapleigh Limberg 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. McDonnell 
Mrs. William Henry Schield 
Mrs A. Wessel Shapleigh 
Mr and Mrs. Warren Shapleigh 
Mrs Lloyd C. Stark 
Mrs Arthur Stockstrom 
Mrs. Horton Watkins 
Mrs. Henrietta Jacobs 
Rosalyn and Debbie Stein 
Mrs. Fred Judell 
Mrs. Frances G. Hencke 
Victor Kennedy 
Clare Bergmann 
Milton L. Daugherty 
Mrs. David Kipnis 
Mr and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 
Mrs. Lila J. Kissel 
Beverly and Selwyn Hotchner 
Frances Kolar 

Mrs. N. W Riemeier 
Dorothy Krings 

Mrs. Helen J. Hilliker 
Mrs. Lena Lauck 

Ella Tappmeyer 

Mrs. Marion June Lauxman 

Mr. J. Cliff Blake 
O'Day Locke 

David and Patty Lehleitner 

Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 

Carl Lohr 

Elizabeth Murray 

Marcie Bakker 

Mr. Charles Lorenz 

Community School Faculty and Staff 

Mr. Walther Lorenzen 

Jan and Jackie Rutherford 

Mrs. Sheridan K. Loy 

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Kircher, Jr. 

Judy and Jerry Rubenstein 

Mrs. Robert Lutz 

Sunnyside Garden Club 

Mary Dee Fenner MacDonald 

Dr. and Mrs. R W. Moellenhoff 

Mrs. Charles Manassa, Sr. 

Robert R. Hermann 

Lawrence J. Mattson 

Fred and June Fangman 

Edwin Menard 

Clarissa and Ray Lippert 

A. W. Meyer 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Alexander Jones 

Mrs. Harold Mills 

Mrs. John H Hayward 

Edith Murch 

Bernice L. Massie 

Perry Norris 

Mrs John Loomis 

Dr. Joseph H. Ogura 

Miss Georgia Richardson 

Mr. Curtis O'Neal 

Dr. and Mrs James R. O'Neal 

Dr. Harvey Owen 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Robert Pommer 

Mrs. Opal Park 

Mrs. Peg Grigg Oberheide 

Mrs. Victoria Peppes 

The George V. Hogan Family 

Marie Dunwell Potter 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Potter 



Anna Beall Wittmann Reading 

Mrs. Blayne M. Brewer 
Mr. Gustav Riepl 

Ella Tappmeyer 

Mary Kathleen Roesler 

Gerry and Marian Barnholtz 
Adrienne and Paul Biesterfeldt 
Hallmark Cards. Inc 
Facilities Planning and 
Design Department 
Hellmuth. Obata & Kassabaum, 

Incorporated 
McCarthy Brothers Construction 

Company 
Michael Construction Incorporated 
Edward and Oramel Roesler 
Mr and Mrs. Harvey E Roesler 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore W. Roesler 
Lynn K Silence 
Mr and Mrs W C Traweek 
George Ruh 
Beatrice Obermeyer 
Mrs. Edwin Schaefer 
Yolanda N Wanek 
John A. Scudder 
Mrs Kenneth H. Bitting 
Mr and Mrs William A Frank 
Mr Robert R Hermann 
Mr. William H. L. Smith 
Mrs. Eva Harper 
Mr and Mrs. Nicholas Scharff II 
Mrs. Jo Soule 
Dr and Mrs. Jack Zuckner 
Dr. Tom K. Spencer 
Mrs. Dwight W. Coultas 
Mr. Whitelaw T. Terry, Sr. 
Mr and Mrs. J. H. Bascom 
Mrs. Jean-Jacques Carnal 

Mr and Mrs. Tom S. Eakm. Jr. 

Mr, and Mrs. S E. Freund 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 
Sidney Briggs Trelease 

American Savings 
Champaign Division 

Mr John H Armstrong 

Helen M Dangerfield 

Mrs. Donald C Dodds 

Mr and Mrs James A Emery. Jr. 

Virginia S Stipes 

Mrs Sidney B Trelease 

Mr and Mrs. William Trelease, Jr., 
and Family 

Helen M. Widick 

Mr. John T. Wedler 

Mrs. Walter W Boswell, Jr. 

Effie Elizabeth Wegner 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Cox 

Mrs Dwight A. Williams, Jr. 

Eugenia Wells 

Mrs. E. R. Hurd, Jr. 

Ruth Wemhoener 

Mr Charles F. Wemhoener 

Mrs. Helen Whitmer 

Flower Arrangers Circle 

Mrs. Leta Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Carlson 

Judy Dowd 

Mrs Rosette Ellman 

Miss Irma L. Howe 

Mrs Leeory King 

Mrs Miriam Petter 

Kathleen Robinson 

The Laakman Family 

Mr. and Mrs P. E. Theisen 

Mr. George Winterowd, Jr. 

Dorothy and Bill 

Iva and Ralph 

Mary Gean and Art 

Dr. Robert Wolff 

Mr and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 

Josephine Green Wood 

Mr and Mrs. Richard S. Jones 

Elizabeth Young Youngblood 

Mrs. Elizabeth N. Young 



15 



Art in the Garden 



Calder in Retrospect 

The Garden will feature an exhibit of the work of Alexander 
Calder from September 1 through October 2 in the Ridgway 
Center. Containing approximately 25 pieces of Calder' s sculp- 
ture, the exhibit is the first major St. Louis showing of the late 
artist's work in nearly two decades, and is a cooperative effort of 
the Garden and the Greenberg Gallery. 



r 




t r 



The Blue Handle. 1975 



Red and Blue on Black and White. 1969 




Boehm Flower Show 

The Garden will feature an exhibit of porcelain flowers, cre- 
ated by the studios of Edward Marshall Boehm, from August 6- 
19 in the Floral Display Hall. Including more than 50 of the 
studios' most important floral pieces, the exhibit will be the 
largest public showing ever of porcelain flowers, according to 
Frank J. Cosentino, President of Boehm International, the com- 
pany that has continued the late Mr. Boehm 's tradition of pro- 
ducing the finest in porcelain sculpture. The exhibit features 
porcelain flowers created in honor of Pope John Paul II, Queen 
Elizabeth, the Prince and Princess of Wales, and Nancy Reagan. 
The Garden has a permanent exhibit of Boehm porcelain birds 
and flowers in the Spink Gallery in the Ridgway Center. (Pic- 
tured: Prince Charles and Lady Diana Rose Royal Centerpiece.) 



MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN-0026-6507) 

P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 




SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST. LOUIS, MO. 



m 




Volume LXXI, Number 6 
October, 1983 



Missouri 

Botanical 

Garden 

Bulletin 



State, National Recognition to Garden Program 



The Missouri Botanical Garden's environ- 
mental education and leadership training pro- 
gram, ECO-ACT, was cited recently as an excep- 
tional educational program as part of the National 
Science Teacher's Association "Search for Excel- 
lence in Science Education" (SESE). ECO-ACT 
was one of two programs honored for the state of 
Missouri and one of fifty recognized nationally by 
the 40,000 member organization of science ed- 
ucators. 

Charles R. Granger, Chairman of Biology at 
the University of Missouri-St. Louis and Chairman 
of the Missouri SESE Committee, said, "Your 
efforts at Missouri Botanical Garden in developing 
an outstanding program has brought distinction to 
the Garden. Beyond that, of course, is the excel- 
lent learning experiences you have provided many 
students through your initiative, creativity, and 
sound educational philosophy." 

According to Dr. Granger, nominations of more 
than 100 programs across the state of Missouri 
were received. The other cited program was Union 
Electric's "Energy Education Program." ECO- 
ACT and the "Energy Education Program" were 
submitted, along with top programs from the other 
49 states to a national N.S.T.A. for evaluation for 
national recognition. 

Descriptions of the 50 cited programs, which 
include both Missouri entries, will be published by 
N.S.T.A. so that they may be used as models for 
similar programs by other institutions. 

ECO-ACT was created in 1981 and provides 
an opportunity for talented high school students to 
learn about environmental issues and to develop 
leadership skills. NSTA is the world's largest 
organization dedicated to the promotion of excel- 
lence in science education, from elementary 
school through college-level curricula. 
—David A. Wilson, Manager, ECO-ACT Program 

Chocolate: Food of the Gods 

In 1712, a newspaper editorial warned its 
"fair readers to be in a particular manner careful 
how they meddle with romances, chocolates, 
novels, and the like inflamers which [are] very 
dangerous." 

Here is not the place to explore the heed 

(continued on page 7) 




Comment 



Two significant anniversaries for the Mis- 
^"^TP^ soun Botanical Garden will occur in the next 
m|U f ew months. Beginning in January, we will 
be celebrating our 125th anniversary with a 
year-long schedule of special events. You 
will be reading and hearing much more 
about this in the weeks ahead. 

The second important anniversary will be 
marked later this month, on October 14-15, 
when we will hold our thirtieth annual Systematics Symposium. 
Begun in 1954, the symposium has each year brought botanists 
and other scientists to the Garden to discuss developments in 




systematics; the meetings have served to promote the dissei 
ination of facts, theories, syntheses, and conclusions on topi 
of interest to biologists. Over the last decade, each year mc 
than 300 scientists visited the Garden for the symposium, coi 
ing from across our own country as well as from other countri 
throughout the world. Last year, for example, we were fortune 
to have as our guests the largest contingent of scientists frc 
the Peoples' Republic of China ever to attend a botanical mei 
ing in North America. In the 30 years the Garden has held it, tl 
symposium has become one of the most important botanic 
meetings in the U.S. 



(continued on page 



HENRY SHAW 
ASSOCIATES 

Anonymous 

Mr. and Mrs Adam Aronson 

Mrs Newell A Augur 

Mrs Agnes F Baer 

Mr and Mrs. Howard F. Baer 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward L Bakewell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs Joseph H Bascom 

Mr and Mrs Carl L A Beckers 

Ms. Sally J Benson 

Mr and Mrs Brooks Bernhardt 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert G. Blanke. Jr. 

Miss Dorothy Brehm 

Miss Ruth Buerke 

Mr and Mrs. John G. Buettner 

Mr. and Mrs William H T Bush 

Mrs. J. Butler Bushyhead 

Mr. Jules D Campbell 

Mrs Jean-Jacques Carnal 

Miss Adelaide Cherbonnier 

Mrs. Fielding T. Childress 

Mr. and Mrs. Fielding L. Childress 

Mr and Mrs. Gary A. Close 

Mr Sidney S Cohen 

Mr and Mrs. Franklin J. Cornwell. Sr 

Mrs. Edwin R. Culver, Jr 

Mrs. Elsie Ford Curby 

Dr. and Mrs. William H Danforth 

Dr. and Mrs Morris Davidson 

Mr. Sam'l C Davis 

Mr Alan E Doede 

Mr and Mrs H R. Duhme, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Robert Edwards 

Mr and Mrs. David C. Farrell 

Mrs. Mary Plant Faust 

Mr and Mrs. John H. Ferrlng 

Mrs. Clark P. Flske 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B Forbes 

Mrs. Eugene A Freund 

Mrs. Henry L Freund 

Mr S E Freund 

Mr. Edward S. Funsten. Jr. 

Mr Robert Lee Funsten 

Mrs Clark R Gamble 

Dr. and Mrs Leigh L. Gerdme 

Mr. Samuel Goldstein 

Mr Stanley J. Goodman 

Mrs. Mildred Goodwin 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Ashley Gray, Jr 

Mr and Mrs Ronald K Greenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Hadley Griffin 

Miss Anna Hahn 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas S Hall 

Mr. and Mrs Norman W. Halls 

Mrs. Ellis H Hamel 

The Hanley Partnership 

Mrs. Marvin Harris 

Mr. and Mrs Whitney R. Harris 

Mr. George Hasegawa 

Mrs John H. Hayward 

Mr and Mrs. Harvard K Hecker 

Mr William Guy Heckman 

Mr. and Mrs Robert R. Hermann 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Hunter 

Mrs. John Kenneth Hyatt 

Mr. and Mrs B F. Jackson 



Mrs. Margaret Mathews Jenks 

Mr and Mrs J Eugene Johanson 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry O. Johnston 

Mr. and Mrs. W Boardman Jones, Jr. 

Mrs. A. F. Kaeser 

Dr. and Mrs John H Kendig 

Mr. and Mrs Samuel M. Kennard III 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer G. Kiefer 

Mr. A. P. Klose 

Mr. and Mrs. William S Knowles 

Mr. and Mrs Robert E Kresko 

Mr. and Mrs Hal A. Kroeger, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs Charles S Lamy 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver M. Langenberg 

Mr and Mrs. Sam Langsdorf, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Lathrop 

Mr and Mrs. John C. Lebens 

Mrs. John S. Lehmann 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard L Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley L. Lopata 

Mr. and Mrs H Dean Mann 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Maritz 

Mr Harry B. Mathews III 

Mrs. Roblee McCarthy 

Mrs. James S. McDonnell. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs Sanford N McDonnell 

Mr, and Mrs. Roswell Messing, Jr, 

Mr and Mrs I IE Millstone 

Mr and Mrs. Hubert C. Moog 

Mr and Mrs. John W. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs Thomas M Moore 

Mrs. W. Gillespie Moore 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter L. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Eric P. Newman 

Mr. and Mrs Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Oertli 

Mrs John M. Olin 

Mr Spencer T. Olin 

Mr and Mrs. W. R. Orthwem, Jr. 

Mrs. Elizabeth R. Pantaleoni 

Mrs. Jane K. Pelton 

Miss Jane E Piper 

Mr. and Mrs Vernon W. Piper 

Mrs. Herman T. Pott 

Mrs, Miquette M, Potter 

Pratt Buick, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. A Timon Primm III 

Mr. and Mrs Joseph A. Richardson 

Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Robinson, Jr. 

Mr Stanley T. Rolfson 

Mr and Mrs G S. Rosborough, Jr. 

Mrs Lucianna Gladney Ross 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis S. Sachs 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Sauer 

Mrs William H. Schield 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr Thomas F. Schlafly 

Mrs. Frank H, Schwaiger 

Mr and Mrs. Richard Shaikewitz 

Mrs A. Wessel Shapleigh 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mrs. Thomas W Shields 

Mrs, John M. Shoenberg 

Mr, and Mrs. Robert H. Shoenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings Smith 



Mrs. Tom K Smith, Sr, 

Mr and Mrs. Tom K. Smith, Jr 

Mr and Mrs, Wallace H. Smith 

Mrs. Sylvia N. Souers 

Mr. and Mrs C C Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Hermann F. Spoehrer 

Mrs Robert R Stephens 

Mr, and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mrs Mildred E. Stifel 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon R. Strauss 

Mr and Mrs. Cornelius F. P. Stueck 

Mr and Mrs. Hampden M. Swift 

Mrs. Martha Love Symington 

Mr. and Mrs Edgar L Taylor, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs Charles L. Tooker 

Mr. and Mrs Joseph W. Towle 

Mr. and Mrs Jack L. Turner 

Mr, and Mrs. John K. Wallace. Jr, 

Mr, and Mrs. Edward J. Walsh, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Hugh R Waters 

Mrs. Horton Watkins 

Mr and Mrs. Richard K. Weil 

Mrs. S. A. Wemtraub 

Mr and Mrs Ben H. Wells 

Mr, and Mrs B K. Werner 

Mr. and Mrs Ornn Sage Wightman II 

Mr. and Mrs Eugene F. Williams, Jr. 

Mrs. John M. Wolff 

Mr and Mrs. Donald D. Wren 

Miss F. A. Wuellner 

Mrs. Elizabeth N Young 

Mrs. Eugene F Zimmerman 

Mr, and Mrs Andrew R. Zinsmeyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Sander B. Zwick 



DIRECTOR'S 
ASSOCIATES 

Anonymous 

Mrs. Arthur B. Baer 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Perry Bascom 

Ms Allison R. Brightman 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Pharr Brightman 

Mrs. Richard I Brumbaugh 

Mr. and Mrs. G A Buder. Jr. 

Mrs. David R Calhoun, Jr 

Mr. Maris Cirulis 

Consolidated Grain & Barge Co 

Mrs. Robert Corley 

Mrs Dwight W Coultas 

Mr and Mrs John L. Davidson, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs Henry P. Day 

Mr Bernard F. Desloge 

Mrs. Joseph Desloge. Sr. 

Echo Valley Foundation 

Mr and Mrs. John R, Galloway 

Mrs. Christopher C Gibson 

Mr. and Mrs. William J Hedley 

Dr. and Mrs. August Homeyer 

Mrs. John Valle Janes, Sr. 

Mr and Mrs M. Alexander Jones 

Mr. and Mrs Roy W. Jordan 

Dr and Mrs. David M. Kipnis 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Koplar 

Mr. and Mrs. Thorn Lewis 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldrige Lovelace 



Mr. and Mrs. David G Lupo 

Mr. and Mrs. James S McDonnell III 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Ben Miller 

Mr and Mrs. Shadrach F. Morris, Jr 

Mr and Mrs. Donn Carr Musick, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs G F Newhard 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Nussbaum 

Mrs. Harry E. Papm, Jr 

Mrs. Jean M. Pennington 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Perry 

Mrs. Drue Wilson Philpott 

Mrs. Ralph F. Piper 

Mr. Dominic Ribaudo 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Ridgway 

Mrs. Edward J Riley. Jr. 

Mrs. John R. Ruhoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Ruprecht 

Safeco Insurance Company 

Mr. Don R. Schneeberger 

St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Co. 

Miss Lillian L. Stupp 

Mr, and Mrs. Harold E Thayer 

Mrs Sidney B Trelease 

Mr and Mrs. Douglas J. Von Allmen 

Mrs Mahlon B Wallace, Jr. 

Watlow Electric Company 

Dr. Clarence S. Weldon 

Dr. Virginia V. Weldon 

Mr. and Mrs Louis I Zorensky 

C. C. Johnson Spink 
President, Board of Trustees 
Mrs. Walter G. Stern, President. 
Executive Board of the Members 
Dr. Peter H Raven 
Director 

8^3 Member of 

W^ The Arts and Education 

Fund of Greater St. Louis 

The MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN 
BULLETIN is published seven times a 
year, in February, April, May. June, 
August, October, and December by the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower 
Grove. St Louis. Mo. 63110 Second 
Class postage paid at St. Louis. Mo. 
$12 00 per year $15 foreign 
The Missouri Botanical Garden 
Bulletin is sent to every Member of the 
Garden as one of the benefits of their 
membership. For a contribution as 
little as $30 per year. Members also 
are entitled to: free admission to the 
Garden. Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitations to special 
events and receptions; announce- 
ments of all lectures and classes; dis- 
counts in the Garden shops and for 
course fees; and the opportunity to 
travel, domestic and abroad, with 
other Members. For information. 
please call 577-5100 
Postmaster: send address changes to 
P.O. Box 299. St Louis. MO 63166 



Gardening in St. Louis 



Fall Color 



>*^J^ 



Fall color is something to be excited about. People from 
Florida, Hawaii, and Southern California travel thousands of 
miles to the Midwest and Northeast to witness this beautiful 
phenomenon. 

Even though most of us in St. Louis take the fall display for 
granted, it only happens because of a series of involved phys- 
iological and chemical changes in plants. During the summer, 
most trees and shrubs display green leaves. The color of these 
leaves is caused by the presence of a complex material called 
chlorophyll. As fall approaches, a corky layer of cells, called 
the abscission layer, forms on the leaf stalks where they attach 
to branches. This corky layer restricts the flow of nutrients to 
the leaves which then causes the degeneration of chlorophyll. 
As a result, the other pigments which have been in the leaves, 
but were masked by the large concentration of chlorophyll, 
become evident. These pigments include carotene (produces 
the color found in carrots and butter) and xanthophyll (yellow or 
brown pigment). 

The blazing crimson colors are caused by another material 
called anthocyanin. This pigment is produced as a result of 
large amounts of sugar manufactured in the leaves during 
bright fall days. These sugars become entrapped in the leaves 
because of the abscission layer and due to the cooler temper- 
atures which slow down the flow of this material from the 
leaves to the rest of the plant. In short, to insure brilliant red 
foliage, two conditions must be met. The days should be warm 
and sunny and the evenings should be cool (45° F. or lower). 

Certain leaves and shrubs have an inherent quality of 
outstanding fall color. It is worth searching-out these plants at 
your favorite nursery to guarantee the most striking display of 
fall color. 



Trees with yellow foliage in the fall are: 

Beeches, Fagus spp. 
Ginkgo, Ginkgo biloba 
Hickories, Carya spp. 
Norway Maple, Acer platanoides 
Ohio Buckeye, Aesculus glabra 
Redbud, Cercis canadensis 
White Ash, Fraxinus americana 
White Oak, Quercus alba 
Yellowwood, Cladrastis lutea 



Trees that h ave red fall foliage include: 

Allegheny Serviceberry, Amelanchier laevis 

American Hornbeam, Carpinus caroliniana 

Black Oak, Quercus velutina 

Black Tupelo, Nyssa sylvatica 

Bradford Callery Pear, Pyrus calleryana "Bradford' 

Cornellian Cherry, Cornus mas 

Crimson King Norway Maple, Acer platanoides 

"Crimson King" 
Flowering Dogwood, Cornus florida 
Franklinia, Franklinia altamaha 
Japanese Maple, Acer japonicum 
Katsura Tree, Cercidiphyllum japonicum 
Lavalle Hawthorn, Crataegus x lavallei 
Red Maple, Acer rubrum 
Red Oak, Quercus rubra 
Sassafras, Sassafras albidum 
Scarlet Oak, Quercus coccinea 
Shumard's Oak, Quercus shumardii 
Sourwood, Oxydendrum arboreum 
Stewartia, Camellia pseudocamellia 
Sugar Maple, Acer saccharum 



Shrubs with red foliage are: 



Arrowwood Viburnum, Viburnum dentatum 
Black Haw Viburnum, Viburnum prunifolium 
Bridalwreath Spirea, Spiraea prunifolia 
Chenault Coralberry, Symphoricarpos x chenaultii 
Cranberry Cotoneaster, Cotoneaster apiculata 
Drooping Leucothoe, Leucothoe fontanesiana 
Fragrant Sumac, Rhus aromatica 
Glossy Abelia, Abelia x grandiflora 
Gray Dogwood, Cornus racemosa 
Koreanspice Viburnum, Viburnum carlesii 
Linden Viburnum, Viburnum dilatatum 
Mapleleaf Viburnum, Viburnum acerifolium 
Nannyberry Viburnum, Viburnum lentago 
Northern Bayberry, Myrica pensylvanica 
Oregon Hollygrape, Ilex aquifolium 
Oriental Photinia, Photinia villosa 
Possum Haw, Ilex decidua 
Rugosa Rose, Rosa rugosa 
Smooth Sumac, Rhus glabra 
Virginia Rose, Rosa virginiana 
Wayfaringtree Viburnum, Viburnum lantana 
Wintercreeper Euonymus, Euonymus fortunei 



Shrubs with yellow foliage include: 



Chinese Witchhazel, Hamamelis mollis 
Kerria (Jetbead), Kerria japonica 
St. Johnswort, Hypericum prolificum 
Star Magnolia, Magnolia stellata 
Vernal Witchhazel, Hamamelis vernalis 
White Fringetree, Chionanthus virginica 



New Nursery Source Manual 

Searching for a particular tree or shrub for your garden? 
Help is on the way from Brooklyn Botanic Garden's Nursery 
Service Manual. Thirteen hundred trees and shrubs are briefly 
described with several sources listed. The Handbook is de- 
signed for easy use and handy reference. Each plant entry in- 
cludes size, color, leaf size and special attributes where they 
apply. Hardiness zones are keyed to the Arnold Arboretum 
hardiness zone map and followed by listed sources (St. Louis is 
in hardiness zone #6). 

This handy and inexpensive ($2.25) publication is available 
in our Garden Gate Shop. 

—Steven A. Frowine, Public Horticulture Specialist 

3 



Comment 



(continued from page 2) 



That the symposium has come to be 
so highly regarded is due in a large part 
to the excellent speakers and moder- 
ators we have been fortunate enough to 
attract, who have included many of the 
world's foremost biologists. But it can 
also be attributed to the fact that the 
Garden is today one of the world's larg- 
est botanical gardens, and certainly is 
the most active botanical research insti- 
tution. The world-wide community of 
biologists looks to the Garden as a 
leader in the field of systematics, a rep- 
utation that stems from the size of our 
herbarium (with more than 3 million 



specimens, one of the ten largest in the 
world), our library (which holds nearly 
every book on systematic botany pub- 
lished since the fifteenth century) and 
the extremely high quality and extent of 
the work of our botanical staff, which 
currently conducts fieldwork in more 
than a dozen tropical countries. 

That we have held the symposium 
regularly over the last 30 years under- 
scores our commitment to promote the 
necessary communication between sci- 
entists, as well as our position as one of 
the most significant scientific institutions 
in the world. 

The symposium has been supported 
by the National Science Foundation since 
1955. 




A new amphitheater, named in honor 
of a long-time Garden supporter, Sidney 
S. Cohen, has been opened just north of 
the demonstration vegetable garden. 
The amphitheater will be used annually 
for performances connected with the 
Garden's popular Japanese festival 
which occurs each June. It will also be 
used to stage plays and to present con- 
certs and dance recitals. Shown in the 
photograph, it was used recently for the 



Theatre Project's production of Shake- 
speare's Much Ado About Nothing. Ac- 
cording to Chairman of Horticulture, 
Alan Godlewski, the plantings around 
the amphitheater will include, along the 
crest, conifers such as pines and 
spruce. Behind the stage will be a line of 
clipped ju.iiper hedge; along the front 
and sides there will be a number of de- 
ciduous trees to produce shade. 



There is a new addition to the pop- 
ular Anne L. Lehmann rose garden. Lo- 
cated at the rose garden's north end, 
near the Shapleigh Fountain, the de- 
velopment will feature ancestral roses, 
including species and many old-fash- 
ioned hybrids. According to the Gar- 
4 



den's Chairman of Horticulture, Alan 
Godlewski, visitors to the Missouri Bo- 
tanical Garden will now be able to trace 
the development of the rose — known as 
America's favorite flower— from ances- 
tral roses to modern roses. 

Immediately adjacent to the new de- 



velopment is an area of the rose garden 
used to test new experimental hybrids 
for possible citation as All-America Rose 
Selection, the highest honor a new rose 
can given. The highest level of the rose 
garden, that nearest the Victorian style 
gazebo, displays many roses which 
have been honored by the A.A.R.S. cita- 
tion; these are the finest commercial 
hybrids available. 

The new development in the Anne L. 
Lehmann Rose Garden is dedicated to 
the memory of her late husband, John S. 
Lehmann, who with his wife was a long- 
time garden supporter. According to 
Mrs. Lehmann, this memorial is ex- 
tremely appropriate since Mr. Lehmann 
was an enthusiastic amateur rosarian 
with a special fondness for the species 
and old-fashioned hybrid roses. 



Letter From Madagascar 




ylang ylang 



Explorers and merchants of two centuries ago were at- 
tracted to Madagascar because of its prime timber for ship- 
building and export, and ships returning to Europe from India 
would stop at this large island off the east coast of Africa to pick 
up cargos of the abundant rice. A century later, the island conti- 
nent became known as the Red Island, a name even more fit- 
ting today. Madagascar has always had an aura of fascination: 
peopled by natives whose religion mixes Christian practice 
with traditional worship of the dead and the ancestors; source 
for esteemed specialties such as vanilla, black pepper, ylang 
ylang, and cloves; former home of the giant bird "Aepyornis," 
and present home for one of the world's most unusual assem- 
blages of plants and animals, including over 20 kinds of lemur, 
dainty little relatives of the apes and monkeys, it is a land apart. 

When I found out last summer that I was to go to Mad- 
agascar, I soon found out too that there had been almost no 
information published on the life of the Island for the preced- 
ing seven years. In 1975, a change of government led to diffi- 
culties for outsiders, and little had appeared in print. Several 
other Garden scientists had worked in Madagascar, but not 
since the change of government. To be the first scientist in 
such a long time to go there with the government's blessing 
spoke highly of the efforts made by the Garden and others on 
our behalf to open up scientific inquiry into this special place. 
Relations have improved to such a degree that the Garden will 
send Dr. Laurence Dorr to Madagascar for a three-year res- 
idence, and Dr. Voara Randrianasolo, scientific liaison officer 
with the Madagascar, or Malagasy, Government, is visiting the 
Garden for study until March of next year. My advance visit was 
useful for its own scientific ends and was also good for 
strengthening ties with the "Red Island." 

My own efforts were directed at inventorying all members of 
the Solanaceae, or potato and tobacco family, occurring on 
Madagascar as part of a worldwide study of the group. On the 
way over in mid-April, I spent a week in Paris examining the 
plant collections at the Museum d' Histoire Naturelle. During 
most of the period from the turn of the century until 1960, 
Madagascar was under French rule, and French botanists had 
built up a large representation of Malagasy plants. From this it 
appeared that a number of quite unusual Solanaceae were to 
be found on Madagascar, and my subsequent field work 
proved this to be true. 

Once in Tananarive, the capital, I examined collections of 
the Pare de Tsimbazaza, the national botanical garden and 
park, and then after transportation difficulties were resolved, I 
made a three week, 2,000 mile trip around the south of the 



island. The area of Tananarive is a pleasant upland of about 
4,000 feet elevation. As winter was just beginning, I wore a 
sweater except during the middle of the day. My first forays 
looking for plants near the capital were a great disappointment. 
Roadsides and gardens were bright with flower and foliage 
color, but all were plants I had seen before in tropical and 
temperate America. 

There were no native plants. It is said that when the French 
first arrived in the area, all the native vegetation had been 
removed, and what is seen now consists of intended and acci- 
dental introductions of plants from almost everywhere else in 
the world. In fact, today we estimate that only 7% of Mad- 
agascar retains its natural vegetation. 

On the trip south, I passed grand landscapes of semi- 
desert and prairie reminiscent of Montana or Utah. Then in the 
extreme south, just outside of the tropics, were the most un- 
usual scrub forests I had ever seen. Plants of the Didieriaceae, 
a plant family known only to Madagascar, spread wand-like, 
thorny arms upwards, and for hundreds of miles the dry scrub 
was dominated by these unworldly plants. In this area, all the 
plants were native, and almost none of them were known out- 
side of Madagascar. Here in a small private nature reserve, I 
saw lemurs feeding in the trees, and I found some of the un- 
usual Solanaceae I had been seeking. 

Madagascar is a fragment of an ancient southern conti- 
nent, Gondwanaland, which 110 million years ago was made 
up of the present continents of South America, Africa, Aus- 
tralia, and Antarctica, and some of the plants there now date 
back through geological history to the time this old continent 
was intact. On nearby Africa, the original plants from all but the 
extreme south were removed during past environmental catas- 
trophes, so the plants now on Madagascar are the only living 
representatives of this primaeval flora. Not surprisingly, many 
are unique. In the extreme south, I found several species of 
Solanaceae that may have been unknown to science, and in 
any case which have no other close relatives among this large 
and widespread group of plants. 

In Paris I had seen collections of several unusual plants 
from the north of Madagascar, so I made a trip north, stopping 
at the island of Nossi Be, and also at the port city of Diego 
Suarez. Nossi Be is all the romantic tropics should be. The 
evening taxi from the airport to town went through sweetly 
scented fields of ylang ylang, the base for the fine perfumes of 
France. Here too are the plantations of vanilla and of black 
pepper, the latter supplying material for the reknowned Mal- 
agasy "steak au poivre" or pepper steak which uses green 
peppercorns. Nossi Be also has fine beaches and resort hotels, 
but the original vegetation is no longer present. 

On the flight from the north back to Tananarive, I was re- 
minded why the island deserves its nickname. Except for the 
dry forests to the south, forests have been cut almost every- 
where, and fires are usually to be seen, making sure that nat- 
ural vegetation does not recover. The "terra rossa" or red earth 
of the island is exposed over most of its area, making it truly a 
"Red Island." Because the flora of the island is unique and is 
also so unusual, and because it holds clues to the origin of 
flowering plant groups everywhere, it is essential that we con- 
tinue study of this plant assemblage. In areas where there is 
still forest, there is heavy cutting for fuelwood. The time when 
Madagascar could provide abundant supplies of ship timbers 
has long gone, and the time for studying the remaining native 
plant life is tragically short. —W. G. D'Arcy, Associate Curator 

5 



Reading Those Tea Leaves 









Last year, there were about two million tons of tea produced 
in the world: slightly less than one pound for each man, 
woman, and child on earth. If you figure that a single tea bag 
weighs a tenth of an ounce, that would come to around 640 bil- 
lion cups of tea, or a cup every other day or so for everyone on 
the planet. To quote Ernie Kovaks from a quarter century ago: 
That's a lota tea. (Ernie, of course, was making a pun on a 
brand name we won't mention here. But his comment stands.) 
Like many of the other important agricultural products of 
our time (coffee and chocolate, for example) the story of tea is 
steeped (sorry) in legend, myth, and intrigue. Just as legends 
describe a divine origin for coffee (according to the Arabs) and 
chocolate (the Aztecs), so are there tales of a supernatural 
genesis of tea: according to the Japanese, the Buddhist saint 
Bodhidharma, during his meditations one day, fought with 
sleep until he cut off his eyelids and threw them onto the 
ground where they rooted and became tea plants. China, ac- 
cepted as the country of origin for the plant (now known as 
Camellia sinensis in the Theaceae or tea family) had a legend 
crediting 28th Century B.C. emperor, Shen Nung, with the cre- 
ation of the beverage. He was boiling water, and leaves from a 
nearby bush floated into the pot. In a medical book attributed to 
him, but not actually written until the third century A. D.— three 
millenia after his death— (the reference to tea does not appear 
until an edition published yet another 400 years later)— it is 
written "It quenches the thirst. It lessens the desire for sleep. It 
gladdens and cheers the heart." Much of the benefit he cites, 
of course, can be attributed to the caffeine content of tea; be- 
tween 2.5% and 4.5% of the dry leaf is this alkaloid. Per cup, 
this is slightly less than the caffeine content of coffee; tea also 
contains a small amount of another stimulant, theophylline. 

For the first several centuries of its use, tea was regarded 
as a medicinal beverage, and was considered beneficial for 
tumors "that come about the head. It dissipates heat caused 
by the phlegms or inflammation of the chest." (This coming 
also from Pen ts'ao, Medical Book, of Shen Nung.) Some of 
these many-century old claims for the medicinal value of tea 
have, in fact, been borne out: aminophylline, which is used in 
the treatment of angina pectoris and as a bronchidialator, was 
first derived from tea. (Like many drugs, it is now manufactured 
synthetically.) 

By the fifth century A.D., tea had become an important arti- 
cle of trade and by the sixth century it was no longer consid- 



ered to be principally a medicinal beverage but was being con- 
sumed for pleasure. By the late eighth century, tea was so 
popular that Chinese tea merchants commissioned a book— 
Ch'a Ching (Tea Classic) that recounted the history of the bev- 
erage and praised its many virtues. It also outlined the proper 
procedures for the baking of the fresh leaves and the brewing 
of the beverage, as well as the drinking of it. For example: 

"Pour it into cups so that it will come out frothy. The frothy 
patches are the ornamentation to the decoction and are called 
'mo' if thin, 'po' if thick. When they are fine and light, they are 
called flowers, for they resemble the flowers of the jujube tree 
tossing lightly on the surface of a circular pool. 

"They should suggest eddying pools, twisting islets or float- 
ing duckweed at the time of the world's creation. They should 
be like scudding clouds in a clear blue sky and should occa- 
sionally overlap like scales on fish. They should be like copper 
cash, green with age, churned by the rapids of a river, or dis- 
pose themselves as chrysanthemum petals would, promis- 
cuously cast on a goblet's stand." 

Is there still such poetry in the dunking of a tea bag into a 
cup of just boiled water? 

The knowledge of tea did not reach Europe until eight cen- 
turies later when, in 1559, a travel narrative, Navigatione et 
Viaggi, by the then-noted author Giambattista Ramusio was 
published. Ramusio, who died two years before his work was 
published, reported in a section entitled, "Tea of China," that 
tea was a hot drink possessing great medicinal qualities. Early 
in the next century the Dutch East India Company began im- 
porting tea to Europe from China and Japan. Almost a century 
after Ramusio brought tea to European attention, a London 
coffee house (coffee was introduced into Europe early in the 
1500s) began selling the prepared tea leaf at a cost of $4 to 
$15 per pound. Within another century, that is by the first 
quarter of the 1700s, tea was commonly used in Europe. 

The tea plant, Camellia sinensis, is— as is obvious from its 
generic name — related to the camellia that is a popular orna- 
mental (Camellia japonica and its many cultivars). C. sinensis 
(originally named Thea sinensis by Carl Linnaeus in his 
Species Plantarum of 1753) is a small tree that grows to about 
nine meters (approximately 27 feet high). If you are interested 
in seeing a specimen of the tea plant, there is one in the Lin- 
nean House, along with many of the popular varieties of the 
C. japonica. 



Chocolate: Food of the Gods 



(continued from page 1) 



paid to the warning against romances and novels, but we 
can say that the admonition against chocolate has been 
ignored. 

Of the three and a half billion pounds of candy consumed 
in the United States each year, almost 60% or two billion 
pounds are chocolate. This is candy consumption alone, 
now. According to the Chocolate Manufacturers' Associ- 
ation, the per capita consumption of all chocolate products 
in 1982 was 9.3 pounds, making chocolate a ten billion dollar 
industry here. The Association reported that the per-person 
consumption had increased during the latest year from its 
low of 8.3 pounds in 1980. 

(For comparison, the annual per capita chocolate con- 
sumption in Switzerland is 22 pounds, considerably more 
than the highest American total of 10.9 pounds per capita in 
1972.) 

Chocolate comes from the cacao (not cocoa) tree, Theo- 
broma cacao, a small evergreen native to the new world 
tropics. Reaching a height of only 25 
feet, it naturally grows in the shade of 
taller trees. (Although some agricul- 
tural experiments have shown that its 
yield may be increased by the reduc- 
tion of shade and that cacao trees 
may flourish best in 50% shade.) The 
trees require 80 inches or more of 
rainfall per year and temperature 
variations of 65-95°F. 

Although native to the American 
tropics, T. cacao is cultivated in trop- 
ical Africa as well as in the new world. 
The leading producers of chocolate 
are Ghana, Nigeria, Brazil, the Ivory 
Coast, and Cameroon. 

For commercial growers and 
chocolate lovers, the most important 
part of T. cacao is its seeds which are 
found in football shaped pods (tech- 
nically berries) that weigh about 1 A 
pound each. Each pod contains 30 to 
50 seeds and, although it produces 
about 6,000 flowers, each tree yields 
only 20 to 30 pods. 

Each tree's yield is only two to 
three pounds of seeds (the cocoa 
beans) in each harvest, although 
under good conditions an acre of 
cacao trees may yield as much as two 
tons of dry powder. 

And from these seeds comes the food of the gods. 
Actually, more than opinion, chocolate is literally the food 
of the gods: its genus name, Theobroma, applied by the 
great Swedish scientist Carl Linnaeus in 1737, comes from 
the Greek theos (god) and broma (food). While Linnaeus' 
name for the tree might well have been an expression of his 
opinion of chocolate (chocolate had been known in Europe 
for about two and a half centuries by then), it is more likely 
his reflection of the Aztec myth about the origin of chocolate. 
They believed that Quetzalcoatl, the god of air, brought 
cacao seeds to man, and like Prometheus the bringer of fire, 
was severely punished by the other gods for giving to 
mortals such a cherished thing. 



The Aztecs consumed chocolate by making a beverage 
from it, thus their name and the origin of our word chocolate, 
choco (foamy) atl (water). In the court of Montezuma, 2,000 
cups of chocoatl were consumed daily. The king himself 
drank 50. Cortes, the Spaniard who conquered the Aztecs, 
reported that the drink gave "strength to march all day 
long." 

For the Aztecs and other Indian civilizations of Central 
America, chocolate was more than a food, however; the 
Aztecs used the beans for currency. Ten would buy a rabbit; 
one hundred beans would purchase a healthy slave. Some 
merchants counterfeited cacao beans by removing the 
cocoa from the shell and replacing it with mud or black wax. 
Since many transactions involved thousands of beans, not 
all of them could be examined by the receiver. 

Cacao also figured prominently in religious, marriage, 
birth, and death rituals. 

A ritual in Yucatan, called tac haa (literally, "serve choc- 







From the Codex Mendoza, an early 16th century Aztec manuscript. The symbols represent the pre- 
scribed tribute to the emperor which included 40 baskets of ground cacao every 80 days. 



olate") specified that one would serve chocolate to the 
father of a girl whom one's son wished to marry. Some mar- 
riage customs called for the bride and groom to exchange a 
certain number of cacao beans; others specified the number 
of beans a woman must include in her dowry. 

In some cultures, an incumbent office-holder would hand 
down cacao beans to his successor. In other cultures choc- 
olate could be consumed only by those of high rank; persons 
of the lower classes were forbidden. 

Cacao was also prescribed as a medicine to cure abdom- 
inal pain, to prevent or counteract certain poisons, to disin- 
fect cuts, and to overcome mental apathy and marked 

timidity. (continued on page 9) 

7 



Fall Fruits 





The produce counter at the gro- 
cery store is a multi-colored feast for 
the eyes during the fall season. Many 
of the fall fruits are favorites of young 
children, and offer an exciting sen- 
sory experience as well as an enjoy- 
able hunt for seeds. Some seeds are 
edible; others are not Each fruit has 
its own characteristic shape, color, 
texture, smell, and taste. What can 
your child discover about fall fruits? 

You will need: An assortment of 
fall fruits, such as apple, pumpkin, 
orange, pomegranate, avocado, pea- 
nut (in the shell); blunt plastic knife; 
plate. 

What to do: Try to take your 
child with you to the grocery store to 
select four or five fall fruits. When 



Make A Fall Mobile 

Autumn is a time of falling leaves 
and ripening seeds. It is also a good 
time to make a mobile. Walk around 
your neighborhood or yard or use 
the Collector's Bag at the Garden. 
Watch for pretty colored leaves and 
seeds or nuts that have fallen to the 
ground. Collect the prettiest or most 
interesting for your mobile. 

A mobile is a type of sculpture. It 
can hang from the ceiling, a door 
frame, a light fixture, or any other 
place where its parts can be easily 
moved by currents of air. 

To make your mobile you will 
need some yarn or thread and a 
twiggy branch without leaves. See if 
8 



you arrive home, set the fruits on a 
plate. Select one fruit to explore; talk 
about its name, color, texture, shape, 
smell. What might the fruit look like 
on the inside? Show your child how 
to use the blunt knife safely, and 
carefully cut open the fruit. How 
does the inside differ from the out- 
side? Is it juicy or dry? How many 
seeds does it contain? Talk about 
seed number and pattern or arrange- 
ment within the fruit Taste some of 
the fruit. Decide if it is sweet, sour, 
salty, wet. mushy, crunchy. Is the 
seed(s) edible? Why or why not? 

Proceed in a similar manner with 
the remaining fruits. If a pumpkin is 
opened, remove the seeds and dry 
them thoroughly overnight. Roast 
them in a 350° oven along with 
butter and salt until the seeds are 
brown — about 20 minutes. They 
then may be eaten. 

Save seeds from each fruit. Try 

planting some of them and watch 

what happens! —Ilene Follman 

Education Consultant 



you can find a branch on the ground 
or have an adult help you cut a small 
branch from a brush or tree. Tie a 
piece of yarn to the center of the 
branch so that the branch balances 
or stays level. Now cut different 
length pieces of yarn. Tie a colorful 
leaf or a seed to the end of each 
piece of yarn. Tie the other end of 
the yarn to the branch. Make sure 
the branch still balances. 

Now your mobile is finished. 
Have your parents help you hang it 
up where the air will gently move the 
leaves. 

—Linda San ford 
Education Department 



Upcoming Family 
Classes 

The following classes all require 
pre-registration and payment of fees. 
For information call: 577-5140. 



October 1 

October 8 
October 15 

October 29 
November 5 

November 19 
December 10 



Reptile 
Rendezvous 
10:00 to 
11:30 a.m. 

Family Birding 

Expedition 

9:00 to 11:30 a.m. 

Pumpkin Farm 

Trip 

9:00 a.m. to 

2:00 p.m. 

Halloween Party 
1:00 to 3:00 p.m. 
Family Fall Stroll 
10:00 a.m. to 
11:30 a.m. 

Holiday Party 
Cooking ( lass 
10:00 a.m. to 
Noon 

Family Wreath 
\ \ ' or k shop 
10:00 a.m. to 

Noon 



Did You Know . . . 

Every fall, squirrels are busy 
planting trees. Of course the squir- 
rels don't know that's what they are 
doing. They are hiding nuts for their 
winter food. 

A squirrel digs a little hole, puts 
in a nut like an acorn or walnut and 
covers it up with loose dirt and 
leaves. In the winter, the squirrel 
won't remember where he buried 
them but he will find many of the 
nuts by smell. In the spring the lost 
nuts will sprout and start to grow 
into trees. 

See if you can watch a squirrel 
while he's busy planting trees. 
Till next time — 

Education Department 



October 

OCTOBER 1-8 

October 1: 



October 2: 

October 6: 
October 8: 

OCTOBER 9-15 

October 10: 

October 12: 

October 13: 
Continues: 

OCTOBER 16-22 

October 16: 

October 19: 

October 20: 
October 22: 

Continues: 

OCTOBER 23-31 

October 24: 

October 25: 



CALENDAR 

Note: New Garden hours, effective until May 1, 1984: 9 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

November 



Lithops Exhibit, Desert House (through October 30). 
Ever seen living stones? The Garden has one of the 
most complete collections of Lithops (living stones) 
anywhere. 

Staghorn Fern Exhibit, Climatron (through Septem- 
ber 30). 

St. Louis Chamber Chorus Concert, Shoenberg 
Auditorium, 3 p.m. Why not come early, have brunch. 
take a short stroll through the Linnean House, say, 
and the Scented Garden, and then enjoy a fine con- 
cert of music with a Spanish accent? 
Korup, a film about the tropics. Shoenberg Audi- 
torium. 10:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. 
Craft Fair, Ridgway Center, all day (on 10/9 also). 
Come see— well, so many different crafts and crafts- 
people we can't mention them here. 

Kurosawa Koto Ensemble Concert, Shoenberg 
Auditorium, 8 p.m. An outstanding group on a national 
tour. 

Lecture, Shoenberg Auditorium, 10:30 a.m. and 
8 p.m. Dave Vismara sheds some light on "21st Cen- 
tury Roses." 

Cry of the Muriqui, a film about the tropics, Shoen- 
berg Auditorium. 10:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. 
Lithops Exhibit 
Staghorn Fern Exhibit 

Israeli Festival, Ridgway Center (through 10/20). A 
celebration of Israeli culture through films, exhibits of 
art and photography, and music 
Lecture, Shoenberg Auditorium, 10:30 a.m. and 
8 p.m. Alan Godlewski, Chairman of Horticulture, in- 
troduces and comments on the film, Trees that Merit 
Attention. 

Island of the Moon, a film about the tropics. Shoen- 
berg Auditorium, 10:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. 
Robin Hood, Shoenberg Auditorium, noon. $1 for 
Members. Another in our series of Disney cartoon 
favorites. 

Lithops Exhibit 
Staghorn Fern Exhibit 

Forest in the Clouds, a film about the tropics, Shoen- 
berg Auditorium. 10:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. 
W. S. Merwin. Shoenberg Auditorium. 8:00 p.m. One 



NOVEMBER 1-5 

November 2: 

November 4: 
November 5: 



NOVEMBER 6-12 

November 6: 

November 8-9: 
November 9: 

NOVEMBER 13-19 

November 12: 



Continues: 

NOVEMBER 20-30 

Continues: 



Lecture. Shoenberg Auditorium, 10:30 a.m. and 8 p.m. 
"Science Fiction Comes True: Plant Genetic Engineer- 
ing" by Dr. Robert Fraley of Monsanto 
Members' Preview of the Fall Flower Show, see invi- 
tation attached. 

Fall Flower Show. Floral Display Hall (through Novem- 
ber 27). One of St. Louis' favorite flower exhibits. 
Food Plants Exhibit. Climatron, through November 27 
A smorgasbord of common and exotic tropical food 
plants. 

St. Louis Chamber Chorus Concert. Shoenberg Audi- 
torium, 3 p.m 

Holiday Preview Sale, Garden Gate Shop. 9 am - 
8 p.m. As always, the finest gifts for 20% off. And some 
refreshments. 

Lecture, Shoenberg Auditorium, 10:30 a.m. and 8:00 
p.m "Amazing and Wonderful: Test Tube Orchids" by 
expert Herman Pigors. 

Ann Beattie. Shoenberg Auditorium, 8 p.m. If you are at 

all in dobut about the quality of contemporary American 

Fiction, come hear Ann Beattie read from her work: she'll 

leave no doubt there are still good writers among us. And 

she's one of the best. 

Fall Flower Exhibit (through November 27) 

Food Plants Exhibit (through November 27) 

Fall Flower Exhibit (through November 27) 
Food Plants Exhibit (through November 27) 



of America's finest contemporary poets gives a read- 
ing of his works. 

October 26: Lecture, Shoenberg Auditorium, 10:30 a.m. and 8 

p.m. "Futuristic Gardening" is explored by Steven A. 
Frowine. 

October 27: Lecture, Shoenberg Auditorium, 10:30 a.m. and 7:30 

p.m., "The American Garden" in an English Setting by 
Lady Jean O'Neill 

October 28-30: Two Alfred Hitchcock thrillers (titles to be an- 

nounced). Shoenberg Auditorium. 7:30 p.m. Mem- 
bers: $2. Think about it: how come every time a new 
thriller opens, the theatre ads always compare it to 
something by Hitchcock? It's because no one ever 
made thrillers better than Hitch. Come and see these: 
but bring a friend you can grab onto These movies 
are no exception from any others — they're shown in a 
dark theatre. 



Chocolate: Food of the Gods 



(continued from page 7) 



Its use for the last two symptoms and as a giver of 
strength, as mentioned by Cortes, can be attributed to theo- 
bromine, an alkaloid related to coffee (both belong to a 
group called xanthine ankaloids). Theobromine is the least 
stimulating of the xanthine alkaloids; caffeine (found in trace 
amounts in cacao), the most. 

Because of the presence of the stimulant theobromine 
and because it has been shown that chocolate consumption 
reduces a body's ability to absorb calcium, many nutri- 
tionists recommend that parents limit their children's choc- 
olate consumption. 

One piece of good news relating to the health of choc- 



olate lovers, however, is that, contrary to the long-held 
belief, laboratory tests have shown that there is no connec- 
tion between chocolate consumption and the occurrence of 
that adolescent scourge, acne. 



Chocolate lovers, and the curious-in-general, can see 
several specimens of the chocolate tree, Theobroma cacao, 
in the Climatron during the Food Plant Exhibit, November 
5-27. It's one of the many economic, tropical plants dis- 
played in that geodesic dome greenhouse. 

The Garden Gate Shop also has several books giving the 
history of chocolate, as well as recipes. 

9 



Profiles in Service 




Sydney M Schoenberg, Jr. 



Beyond any doubt, the Missouri Bo- 
tanical Garden is one of the most beau- 
tiful in the world. The Garden attracts a 
half a million visitors each year and is 
one of St. Louis' primary tourist attrac- 
tions. The point was made by one of the 
world's foremost living landscape de- 
signers, Roberto Burle Marx, in his 
Greensfelder lecture last May, that 
green spaces and gardens are an es- 
sential part of an urban area; that people 
need them for psychological and spir- 
itual refreshment. Shaw's Garden, he 
stated, was one of these places. 

Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr., a mem- 
ber of the Garden's Board of Trustees 
since 1972, believes in this so strongly 
that for more than a decade he has 



Dr. George Van Schaack 




Dr. George Van Schaack, who 
served as Curator of Grasses and 
Librarian during a 20-year association 
with the Garden (from 1948-1968), 
died recently in Florida. Born in 1903, 



given — as have all the Garden's trust- 
ees — more hours of service than can be 
calculated. Through his position as an 
officer of the Shoenberg family's foun- 
dation, he was also responsible for the 
creation of two major features of the 
Garden; the Shoenberg Auditorium in 
the Ridgway Center and the Shoenberg 
Fountain at the Garden's south end. 

The eleven years during which Mr. 
Shoenberg served as trustee have been 
one of the most active and important in 
the Garden's entire history with the 
opening of the John S. Lehmann Build- 
ing, the Anne L. Lehmann Rose Garden, 
the Japanese Garden and most re- 
cently, the Ridgway Center. 

The most significant accomplish- 
ments of the period, Mr. Shoenberg 
says, were the successful Capital Fund 
drive and the increased awareness by 
St. Louisans and visitors from outside 
the area that the Garden is an important 
part of the cultural life of the city. 

He emphasized that this last accom- 
plishment can be measured quantita- 
tively in the tremendous rise in the num- 
ber of members, from 2,400 in 1972, to 
16,000 presently. Mr. Shoenberg credits 
the work of the Executive Board of the 
Members for this increase. No other 
botanical garden in the world has a 
larger membership. 

Mr. Shoenberg expresses pleasure 
in the fact that more and more people 
are visiting the Garden, becoming mem- 
bers, and looking to it as a significant 
institution. To quote Mr. Shoenberg: "I 
know I am working with an organization 
that is one of the finest of its kind in the 
entire world." 



Dr. Van Schaack was a man of many 
talents and interests. Although he 
was first trained in the piano and 
music theory, he received his Ph.D. in 
Mathematics from Harvard University 
in 1935. He developed his interest in 
botany, and especially in grasses, 
while he was stationed in the Aleutian 
Islands during World War II. After the 
war, he accepted an appointment to 
teach Mathematics at Washington 
University, St. Louis. There he met 
Dr. Edger Anderson (a botanist at the 
Garden for almost 40 years, and Gar- 
den Director from 1954-1957) who 
persuaded him to join the Garden's 
staff. 



10 




One of the Garden's most popular flower ex- 
hibits of the year, the Fall Flower Show, opens on 
November 5 and continues until November 27. A 
special, Members'-only preview will be held on 
Friday, November 4 See invitation at center of 
the Bulletin for details. 




W. S Merwm 

Two of America's most important con- 
temporary writers will present readings 
from their works at the Garden in Octo- 
ber and November as part of the River 
Styx P.M. series that returns to the 
Shoenberg Auditorium for the second 
consecutive year. 

On October 28, at 8:00 p.m., W. S. 
Merwin will read from his poetry. Ann 
Beattie will read from her fiction on 
Sunday, November 15. 

Merwin has received both the pres- 
tigious Pulitzer Prize and National Book 
Award for his poetry. Beattie, who has 
been honored by the American Acad- 
emy and Institute of Arts and Letters, is 
the author of two critically acclaimed 
novels and three collections of short 
stories, most of which originally ap- 
peared in The New Yorker. 

Admission is $5 in advance; $6 at the 
door. Garden Members receive a 10% 
discount. For information, contact Big 
River Association at 7420 Cornell, St. 
Louis, MO 63130. Advance tickets are 
available at Paul's Books and Left Bank 
Books 



Meet Our Commissioners 




Robert M Sunnen 



On April 5, 1983, voters in the City 
and County of St. Louis approved a 
measure creating a Botanical Garden 
Subdistrict of the eleven-year-old Zoo- 
Museum District. Through the Subdis- 
trict the Missouri Botanical Garden will 
benefit from a property tax of up to 4C 
per $100 assessed valuation, providing 
the Garden with a stable financial base 
for operation. In the next several issues, 
we will offer our readers an opportunity 
to meet the ten commissioners who will 
govern the Subdistrict. Five of the com- 
missioners were appointed by the Mayor 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

C C Johnson Spink, President 

William R. Orthwein. Jr., First Vice-President 

Robert R. Hermann. Sr . Second Vice-President 

Mr Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr John H. Biggs 

Mr William H T Bush 

Mr Robert E. Kresko 

Mr. Stephen H Loeb 

Mr William E Maritz 

Mr. James S. McDonnell III 

Mrs. Vernon W Piper 
Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

Mr. Louis S. Sachs 
Dr Howard A. Schneiderman 

Mr. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg. Jr 

Mr. Tom K. Smith, Jr 

Mr John K. Wallace. Jr 

Mr Robert C. West 

Mr Harry E. Wuertenbaecher. Jr. 




Sandra Hasser Bennett 



of the City of St. Louis, Vincent C. 
Schoemehl; five were appointed by St. 
Louis County Executive, Gene McNary. 
Robert M. Sunnen (appointed by Coun- 
ty Executive Gene McNary) is a native of 
St. Louis and a graduate of Washington 
University. His business career has 
been divided between several real es- 
tate development companies which he 
co-founded, and his current position of 
Chairman of the Board and President of 
Sunnen Products Company. He is also 
Chairman of The Sunnen Foundation, 
which has supported a number of spe- 



EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Mr Howard F. Baer 

Mr Sam'l C. Davis 

Dr. Thomas S. Hall 

Mr. Henry Hitchcock 

Mr A Timon Primm III 

Mr Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr Robert Brookings Smith 



EX OFFICIO TRUSTEES 

Mrs Paul Alcott 
President. St. Louis Board of Education 

Mr. Jules D. Campbell 

President. St. Louis Academy of Science 

Dr William H. Danforth 

Chancellor, Washington University 

The Rev Thomas R. Fitzgerald. S.J. 

President. St. Louis University 

The Rt. Rev Wm A. Jones, Jr. 

Episcopal Bishop of Missouri 

The Honorable Vincent C. Schoemehl. Jr 

Mayor. City of St. Louis 



cial projects at the Missouri Botanical 
Garden. 

Mr. Sunnen is a former Director of 
American Association of Industrial De- 
velopment and served as its Chairman 
in 1978. He has also served on the 
Boards of several charities, including the 
YMCA, Planned Parenthood of St. 
Louis, and the National Board of Amer- 
icans United. 

Sandra Hasser Bennett (appointed by 
Mayor Schoemehl), a native St. Louisan, 
has been visiting the Missouri Botanical 
Garden since her childhood. She partic- 
ularly enjoys the Japanese Garden, and 
feels it provides an environment which 
encourages introspection and a contem- 
plation of man's place in the universe 
much like the formal gardens she visited 
while in Japan some years ago. 

Mrs. Bennett has a Bachelor of Arts 
Degree from Webster College, and was 
elected to the 1982 Edition of Who's 
Who Among Students in American Col- 
leges and Universities. She is employed 
by Monsanto Company as a Local Gov- 
ernment Affairs Assistant. 

In 1979, she served on the Linden- 
wood Community School Board, and 
taught genealogy there last semester. 
She is currently involved in various civic 
and community activities, including a 
new project to develop methods of pre- 
serving old St. Louis records now held 
by the Recorder of Deeds. Mrs. Bennett 
also serves on the Advisory Committee 
for a National Center for Urban Ethnic 
Affairs study. 

She and her husband, Harry, have 
three teenage sons and live in the Lin- 
denwood area of the City. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD 
OF THE MEMBERS 

OFFICERS 

Mrs. Walter G. Stern, President 

Mrs. Rudyard Rapp, First Vice-President 

Mrs. Pedrick Conway, Second Vice-President 

Mrs Bruce R Yoder, Secretary 

Mrs. Charles Cook, Treasurer 



m 



11 



Music in the Garden 



Music at Ridgway, four concerts by the 
St. Louis Chamber Chorus, will be pre- 
sented this year in the Garden's Shoen- 
berg Auditorium. The first concert, Octo- 
ber 2, at 3 p.m., will feature works for 
chorus and solo guitar by Spanish com- 
posers; Michael Newman, who has 
gained critical acclaim for his per- 
formances at Carnegie Hall and at nu- 
merous universities in North America, 
will be the guest soloist. The second 
concert, November 6, also at 3 p.m., will 
present settings of Old Testament texts 
by 20th Century composers, including 
Daniel Pinkham, Alberto Ginastera, 
Ross Lee Finney, and Leonard Bern- 
stein. A concert in March will offer the 
St. Louis premier of Frank Martin's Le 
Vin Herbe. The final program of the 
season, in April, will feature works by 
J. S. Bach and Haydn. 

Individual tickets for performances 
are $5 at the door. A subscription to all 
four concerts is $15; information may be 
obtained by contacting the Chamber 
Chorus at 721-7212, or by writing to 




v^ 




Michael Newman 

them at P.O. Box 3045, St. Louis, MO 
63130 

The Kurosawa Koto Ensemble will pre- 
sent a program of koto music on Mon- 
day, October 10 at 8:00 p.m. in the 
Shoenberg Auditorium. Sponsored by 
the Japan America Society of St. Louis, 




Kurosawa Koto Ensemble 

the Asian Art Society of Washington Uni- 
versity, and the Missouri Botanical Gar- 
den, the performance is part of a na- 
tional tour. Admission is $5 for non- 
Members, $4 for Members. Tickets will 
be available at the door; further infor- 
mation may be obtained by calling 342- 
2120 




A. Timon Primm III (left) received the 
Feinstone Environmental Award for his 
conservation efforts in the state of Mis- 
souri earlier this year. The award is given 
annually to five outstanding environ- 
mentalists in the United States. Mr. 
Primm, a Trustee Emeritus of the Gar- 
den, is retired Senior Vice President of 
the Pulitzer Publishing Company. As a 
Member of the Garden's Board, he was 
extremely involved in the expansion of 
Shaw Arboretum. He has also been in- 
volved in conservation activities related 
to Buford Mountain; Clarksville Island, a 
wintering site north of St. Louis for Bald 
Eagles; and four state parks 




Jean O'Neill, wife of Terence O'Neill who 
served as Prime Minister of Northern 
Ireland from 1963-1969, will present a 
lecture, "The American Garden" in an 
English Setting in the Shoenberg Audi- 
torium on October 27 at 10:30 a.m. and 
7:30 p.m. Lady O'Neill is a writer and 
lecturer on the subject of garden history 
and is currently Vice President of the 
Garden History Society. She is also ac- 
tively involved in the Hampshire Gar- 
dens Trust, a newly-formed conservation 
body founded to advise on the conserva- 
tion of gardens, especially those of out- 
standing historical and botanical interest 
in Great Britain 



Lecture Series: Plants 
of the Future 

From ancient soothsayers to Nostra- 
damus, from Jules Verne to Isaac As- 
imov, from Melies' Trip to the Moon to 
Lucas' Star Wars, man has been fasci- 
nated with knowing about the future. 
This fall, the Missouri Botanical Garden 
provides a glimpse into our future, spe- 
cifically as it relates to gardening and 
horticulture, with a series of five lec- 
tures. All are held in the Shoenberg 
Auditorium and, as in the past, will occur 
at 10:30 a.m., and 8 p.m. on each date. 
Members are invited to bring guests. 
October 12: 21st Century Roses: Gar- 
den Rosarian David Vismara. 

October 19: Trees that Merit Attention: A 
film produced by the Garden Clubs of 
America, and introduced with comments 
by Chairman of Horticulture, Alan God- 
lewski. 

October 26: Futuristic Gardening: Pub- 
lic Horticulture Specialist, Steven A. 
Frowine. 

November 2: Science Fiction Come 
True: Plant Genetic Engineering, Mon- 
santo Research Specialist, Dr. Robert 
Fraley. 

November 9: Amazing and Wonderful: 
Test Tube Orchids, Oak Hill Nursery 
Orchid Hybridizing Specialist, Herman 
Pigors. 



Fall Film Series 

Five of the most fascinating films 
ever produced about the tropics will be 
shown in the Garden's Shoenberg Audi- 
torium during October. Each film will 
be shown twice, at 10:30 a.m. and at 
7:30 p.m. 

October 6: Korup, introduced by Dr. 
J. S. Gartlan, University of Wisconsin, 
who was scientific advisor to the film. It 
deals with the proposed Korup National 
Park in Cameroon, and includes scenes 
of many primates never before filmed. 

October 13: Cry of the Muriqui, intro- 
duced by one of the World Wildlife Fund 
Advisors to the film. It concentrates on 
the endangered primates of southeast- 
ern Brazil and the equally endangered 
Atlantic forest habitat. 

October 20: Island of the Moon, in- 
troduced by Dr. Robert Sussman of 
Washington University. The film con- 
cerns the problems of conservation of 
natural habitats in Madagascar (see a 
related story on page 5). 

October 24: Forest in the Clouds, in- 
troduced by Garden Director Peter H. 
Raven. It shows the biological diversity 
and threatened status of a Costa Rican 
rainforest. 

October 31: Baobob: Portrait of a 
Tree, introduced by Garden botanist Dr. 
Robert McGill. The film is a close-up 
look at Africa's legendary upside-down 
tree and the interdependence of life in 
and around it. 

All Garden Members are invited to 
attend the series. Admission is free; 
there will be an opportunity for questions 
and answers following each film 





The Garden's Holiday Preview Sale, one 
of St. Louis' most popular early holiday 
sales for many years, will be held on 
November 8 and 9 in the Garden Gate 
Shop, Ridgway Center. Members are in- 
vited to take advantage of 20% savings 
on some spectacular, unusual, and 
unique gifts, including china, books, 
prints, and other merchandise appro- 
priate for the season. The hours of the 
sale are 9 a. m. -8 p. m 

Watch for the Garden 's magnificent 125th 
anniversary calendar for 1984 



Randall D. Barron (right), Vice-President 
— Missouri of the Southwestern Bell 
Telephone Co., recently presented Peter 
H. Raven, Director of the Missouri Bo- 
tanical Garden, a $55,000 check to help 
fund the completion of the Ridgway Cen- 
ter, the Garden's new gateway and vis- 
itor center. "The Southwestern Bell Tele- 
phone Co.'s tremendous generosity not 



only enables us to take a step closer to 
completing the Ridgway Center but also 
represents this company's strong com- 
mitment to community development," 
said Raven. This marks the second sub- 
stantial contribution from the South- 
western Bell Telephone Co. towards fin- 
ishing touches for the new facility 




Shalom Israel: Israeli Festival 

On October 16 through 20 the Missouri Botanical Garden 
will be host to an Israeli Festival entitled Shalom Israel. The 
festival will feature exhibits of Israeli crafts, art, photography, 
as well as an exhibit entitled "Children of the World Paint Jeru- 
salem." The Israeli festival will also feature an audio-visual 
presentation on Israel, entitled "Another Israel." 

"Another Israel" tells a story of Israel in breathtaking pan- 
oramas of the land — its green plains, barren desert, olive 
clothed hills. 

The Israel festival will also feature performances of Israel 
music in addition to lectures and traditional food. 

(at left) Alley in Jerusalem (1959). woodcut by Jakob Pins. One of almost 70 
prints to be included in ■'Jerusalem and the Israeli Prmtmaker. "part of the Israeli 
Festival. 



Fall Festival Features Crafts 

Be sure and come to the second annual Fall Festival, Octo- 
ber 8 and 9, in the Ridgway Center. Last year's festival was one 
of the most popular activities of the autumn. This year's festival 
includes story-telling as well as a number of crafts. There will 
be porcelain sketches, paper marbling, jewelry, pottery, quilts, 
wooden toys, needlepoint. There will also be a number of gifts 
and decorations suitable for the winter holidays. 

13 




The Garden has a new sculpture. Gox #8 
by renowned St. Louis sculptor Ernest 
Trova (shown here with his work) was in- 
stalled recently at the southeast corner 
of the John S. Lehmann building. The 
sculpture is on loan from Laumeier 
Sculpture Park. At the reception honor- 
ing the installation of Gox #8 Garden 



Director Peter H. Raven noted that this 
loan from Laumeier marked the contin- 
uation of the excellent cooperation 
among St. Louis Cultural Institutions. 
Ernest Trova is respected throughout 
the world as one of the premier sculptors 
of our time. His best known works are 
those in his Falling Man series 




The Garden was recently privileged to host 
the first maior St. Louis exhibit of the work of the 
late sculptor. Alexander Calder (1898-1976). A 
joint effort of the Garden with the Greenberg Gal- 
lery of St. Louis, the exhibit — titled Calder in 
Retrospect — was greeted enthusiastically by 
visitors and attracted much attention from art 
lovers and critics alike. 

14 



Join Us! Tour to Exotic 
Old World Tropics 

January 18- February 6, 1984 

The members' tour to the Far East 
will be a unique opportunity for you to 
see the plants and people of Thailand, 
Singapore, Hongkong, Philippines, and 
Indonesia. In addition to experiencing 
the mysterious and intriguing cultures 
and art of these countries, you will have 
the opportunity to visit tropical plant nur- 
series, private gardens, botanical gar- 
dens, and orchid farms which are rarely 
seen by tourists. If you do not already 
have our tour brochure, call the mem- 
bership office at 577-5120 for a copy. 
Space for this tour is limited, so please 
make your reservation as soon as pos- 
sible. 



New Members 

July-August, 1983 

Contributing Members 

Mr. Barry C Burkholder 

Dr. William S Costen 

Dr. Roy Curtiss III 

Mr. Charles M Deeba 

Jules Desloge 

Larry V. Duvall 

Dr and Mrs John O. Edstrom 

Mr and Mrs Warren J. Gelman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert O Gnncewich 

Sandra R Horn 

Mr Dave Joyce 

Mr. Jeffrey Kimbrell 

Mr. and Mrs David T McPherson 

Mrs. Rose Marie Neher 

Betty J. Perkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary W. Schmidt 

Mr. Charles Shaffar 

Mrs Erma L. Williams 

Sustaining Members 

Mr, and Mrs John Burd 

Mr and Mrs William R Covich 

Celestine A Ghio 

Mr John C Seed 

Mr and Mrs E. R. Thomas. Jr. 



Increased 
Support 

Contributing Members 

Mr. Lynden Anderson 

Dr, and Mrs. George Anstey 

Mr. and Mrs William B Bennet 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth J Bennett 

Mr. Richard Bischof 

Mr and Mrs Malcolm A Bliss 

Mr. and Mrs Frank Block 

(continued on page 15) 



Let's Grow Lilies ... the second annual 
lily bulb sale by the Mid-America Re- 
gional Lily Society, will be held in the 
Floral Display Hall, Ridgway Center, on 
October 22-23. Several hundred bulbs 
representing many different varieties will 
be available. Hours of the sale are 11 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, October 
22, and 9 a.m. -4:30 p.m. on Sunday, the 
23rd. Call 434-2109 for information. . . . 



fffff 



Aside from the January/February tour of 
the Far East noted at left, the Garden 
has planned two other trips for its Mem- 
bers. In March, 1984, Jane Coultas 
(Manager of the Garden's historic Tower 
Grove House) will lead a tour to Wil- 
liamsburg and Alexandria. In May, 
Chairman of Horticulture, Alan Godlew- 
ski, will take Members to Italy. Members 
should watch the mail for further details. 



Increased Support 

(continued from page 14) 



Mr. Jordan J. Bloomfield 
Mrs. Oliver C Boileau, Jr. 
Mr and Mrs. David E. Buck 
Carpel. Linoleum, Hardwood & 
Resilient Tile Layers- 
Local Union No. 1310 
Mr and Mrs Thomas N. Castor 
Mr and Mrs. James C. Coe 
Mr Herbert D Condie III 
Mr. and Mrs Richard J. Davis 
Mr. Oliver Deex 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence E. Franke 



Tributes 

July-August 1983 
IN HONOR OF: 

June and Ray Baehr 

Gerry and Marian Barnholtz 

Harriet Rodes Bakewell 

St. Louis Herb Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Bender 

Kathenne E Herzog 

Ruth McNulty 

Mrs. H. Rinesmith 

Mr. and Mrs Lyle S Woodcock 

Violet and William Bowling 

Philip and Jane Hall 

Mrs. Evelyn Cowgill 

June and Harold Kravin 

Mrs. Use Jordan 

Use Mansbacher 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Katsev 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin M. Nugent 

Mr. Morton Mallory 

Harold and June Kravin 

Mr. Charles Orner 

Mr. and Mrs Walter Stern 

Mrs. Sydney M. Shoenberg 

Dr. and Mrs. Llewellyn Sale. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Silverman 

Henrietta and Peter Hochschild 

IN MEMORY OF: 



Mr. Harry Ackerman 

Peter and Ann Husch 

Sue Adams 

Mr. and Mrs C C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Margaret Alberter 

Mr. and Mrs John E. Vigil 

Aunt Bess 

Jerry and Norma Nissenbaum 

Josephine Sommer Baker 

Pauline C. Mesker 

Mrs. Robert Bassett's Mother 

Henrietta and Peter Hochschild 

Mr. Charles Berner 

The Jurkiewicz Family 

The Turner Family 

Mrs. Elaine Bono 

Mr and Mrs. Michael L. Austin 

Mr. William A. Borders 

Mr. and Mrs Ingram Boyd 

Mrs. Fielding Childress 

Lester and Judy Goldman 

Mrs. John H. Hayward 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 

Mr. and Mrs. C J Maurer 

Mrs W. Gillespie Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Dalene C. Boundy 

Jan and Dick Dunlap 

Sue and David Herbold 



Mr and Mrs. Floyd V. Freyer 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Fulton 

Miss Marianne Gagel 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Y. Garner 

Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin L. Guzdial 

Mr. Charles W. Hawken 

Mrs Douglas Kirberg 

Mr. and Mrs. B. S. Kissel 

Mr, and Mrs. Albert D. Krueger 

Mrs. Mary E. Lindsey 

Mr. and Mrs Vance C. Lischer 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mac Cash 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Mangelsdorf 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. Maxson 

Mr. Stanley Miller 

Miss Bernice D. Mocker 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P, Morgan 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Myers 

Dr. and Mrs G. C Oliver 

C. Marie Orms 

Miss V. L Park 

Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Pearlmutter 

Ms Celeste M. Reisch 

Dr. and Mrs. Daniel P. Roman 

Mr. and Mrs Robin A. Russell 

Mr. and Mrs James H Saunders 

Mr and Mrs Donald Schnuck 

Mr Bruce Schuette 

Mr and Mrs. Charles H. Schwarting 

Mr and Mrs. J. T. Vaughan 

Mr Edward J. Walsh, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven R. Wilhelm 

Mr. Donald Willmering 

Zane V. Zeable 



Sustaining Members 

Dr. Herman T Blumenthal 

Mrs. C. R Graves 

Mr Stuart Hollander 

Mr and Mrs. Howard Potratz 

Mr Michael Preis 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard C. Shaw 

Mr. Ned Siegel 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Stokes III 



Sponsoring Members 

Mr. and Mrs Vernon Goedecke 
Mr. and Mrs Harrison N. Howe 
Mr. and Mrs. Clark B. Payne 



Mrs. Clara Brooks 

Linda and Gary Bnnkman 
Gertrude M. Buerke 
George A. Buerke 

Ruth E. Buerke 

Mr. Arthur J. Butler 

Mr and Mrs. Francis O. Trotter III 

Isabelle B. Campbell 

Mr and Mrs. Robert L. Blanke. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William R Orthwein, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Peter H Raven 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Adelaide Carver 

Frances S. Mitchell 

Mrs. Teresa Cavataio 

Colgate R&D Division 

Mae Shiappa 

Mr. Alfonso J. Cervantes 

Mr and Mrs. John K. Wallace, Jr. 

Jane Marlea Clarke 

Mrs. Gemma Hoerber 

Mr. Frederick C. Danforth 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Grindler, Jr. 

Mrs. Amelia Overall Davis 

Mr. and Mrs John K. Wallace. Jr 

Mildred B. Easterly 

Anne Wilson 

Mrs. Dorothy Emert 

Mr. and Mrs. William N. Myers 

Mrs. Hazel Farney 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Freese 

Eleanor Fischer 

Mr. and Mrs, Davis Seslen 

Mrs. Gladys M. Funsten 

Anne and Amy Stewart 

Collette and Tiffany Gill 

Kris Johnson 

Marie B. Nemnich 

Mrs. Glass 

Mr. and Mrs. Barry Famtich 

Mr. John W. Glenn 

Executive Board of the Members 

Eleanora Markus 

Virginia Elizabeth Golman 

Mrs. Olivia Branneky 

Mrs. Robert Burnett 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry L Weier 

Mr. Robert Gordon, Sr. 

Alexi and Frank Massa 

Jackie and Bill Saunders 

Dr. Charles Griege 

Dr. and Mrs. Manfred Thurmann 

Mrs. Grimm 

Ruth and Gunnar Brown 

Mr. Bernard Gross 

Mrs. Jane Lending 

Mrs. Paul O. Hagemann 

Mr. and Mrs C C Johnson Spink 

Victor S. Hallauer 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. McReynolds 

Gen. William H. Harrison 

Mr. and Mrs. James Hudson Jones 



Mrs. Grace Hart 

Kathryn and Lisa Eresh 

Mrs. Gertrude C. Hartenbach 

Miss Dorothy Becker 

Mrs. John Hess, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Kille 

Mr. Matthew Hirsh 

Mr and Mrs. Lester Adelson 

Mrs. Arthur Hoskins 

Mrs. Kenneth M. Davis 

Mr. John A. Isaacs, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs. Lester R. Adelson 

Ann and Peter Husch 

John and Helen Joynt 

Marilyn and Arthur Boettcher 

Mrs. Helen Karwoski 

Kathryn and Lisa Eresh 

Mrs. Joseph Kirkwood 

Florence Freyermuth 

Mr. Wallace J. Kletzker 

Mr. and Mrs. H Ivis Johnston 

Mary Kloster 

Mr. Edwin J. Kadlec 

Mr. Robert F. Knight 

Mr and Mrs. Edwin S. Baldwin 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Bush, Jr. 

Judge and Mrs Roy W. Harper 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Robert Pommer 

Amos Lee Knudstad 

Mr. and Mrs. J. William Flaig and Family 

Irvin F. Krughoff 

Mr. and Mrs Thomas J. McReynolds 

Joan Corcoran Lamartina 

Dr. and Mrs. William M. Fogarty 

Sara Lewis 

Alma and Myra Simms 

Mrs. Violet Link 

Jim Moore 

Fred Rock 

Clementine Linzee 

Virginia G. Crowdus 

Dave Ludwig 

Rosalind Schuchat 

Mr. Owen H. Mitchell 

Anne and Amy Stewart 

Augusta Mohlman 

The Andrew Kocot Family 

Mrs. Irma Moog 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester R. Adelson 

Mrs. Anna M. Nigh 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. Boswell, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. William M. Fogarty 

Isaac C. Orr 

Laura Andreas 

Mr. and Mrs. Ingram Boyd 

Mr and Mrs. Charles G. Buffum. Jr 

Mrs, William Cotter 

Mrs. John E. Curby 

Mrs H. P. Duncker 

Mrs Sam F. Gordon 

Henrietta H Lammert 

Mrs. Mary MacCarthy 



Mr. Ambrose Ottolini 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Purk 

Beulah Rachlin 

Rosalind Schuchat 

Mrs. Paul Riggs 

Corliss E Gigax 

Mrs. Clara Marie Rischeck 

Buds and Blossoms Garden Club 

Mary Kathleen Roesler 

Mrs. Alma F. Fhckiger 

The Hall Family 

The Hallmark Organization of 

Kansas City 
HOK Construction Administration Staff 
Mr and Mrs, Larry Hultengren 
Mr and Mrs. Charles H Lenzing 
Mrs Lois A Peden 
Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Ryan 
St. Louis Regional Commerce and 

Growth Assn. 
Mrs. Joe Schlesinger 
Corliss E. Gigax 
Mrs. Alma Schumann 
Miss Audrey Shearer 
Mr. Milton J. Scott 
Oak Valley Garden Club 
Mr and Mrs. Robin A. Russell 
Mrs. Pauline Shindel and Naomi 
Dr. Ottis Seabaugh 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Kelly 
Dr. Lewis J. Sherman 
Martin H. Sherman 
Mr. William H. L. Smith 
Mr. and Mrs C. C. Johnson Spink 
Mr. Gilbert Spieldoch 
Mr. and Mrs. John Torrey Berger. Jr. 
Mr. A. Ernest Stein 
Mr and Mrs. Lester R Adelson 
Sylvia and Arthur Fischer 
Ann and Peter Husch 
Mary Ann Stein 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard F Baer 

Mr. and Mrs Charles J Cook 

Mr. Charles H. Stephens 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mr. Whitelaw T. Terry 

Mr and Mrs. John K. Wallace, Jr. 

Mrs. Grace Vollmer 

Mr, and Mrs. William A. Frank 

Mrs. Karl Vollmer 

Mr and Mrs, Minard MacCarthy 

Mrs. Eleanor Wade 

Alexander & Alexander, Inc 

Jeane DeNatale 

Wilson Fueller 

Mrs. Effie Elizabeth Wegner 

Robert and Kay Easton 

Mrs. Gwendolyn Messner 

Mr. Richard Weiss 

Rosalind Schuchat 

Miss Mary Jane Wiesler 

Miss Gerry Barnholtz 



15 



Rain At the Japanese Garden 




The waterfall is there, 
screened until its point of view, 
and revealed in a moment difficult to believe, 
as if in that glimpse to make you aware 
its pouring is real, not you. 

But if this is true, why 
is the satin lining yours alone 

when you wear the pond — and its garden — like a sleeve? 
The riddle ripples a pewter sky 
which answers with a koan: 

a master sits, head bowed, 
and say a tycoon, on the same bench; 



wheels and deals and the lack that is achieved. 
How is each denying, under a cloud, 
he's anything rain can quench? 

We ran before it broke, 
not as accepting as a well, 
nor bribing one for an indefinite reprieve. 
Clumping, under a see-through coat, 
we drank the swim as it fell. 

— John S. Harris 

John S Harris has published his poetry in several literary journals and has 
received many awards for his work. He is presently President of St. Louis Poetry 
Center. "Rain at the Japanese Garden" originally appeared in Webster Review 



MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN-0026-6507) 

P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST. LOUIS, MO. 



m 



<2 2 



m 




Volume LXXI, Number 7 
December 1983 



Missouri 

Botanical 

Garden 

Bulletin 



Rose Garden of the Year 

The Anne L. Lehmann Rose Garden, for several years one 
of the Missouri Botanical Garden's most popular features, was 
cited this autumn with the All-America Rose Selections 1983 
Public Rose Garden Award. This award is made, once a year, to 
an outstanding United States rose garden if there is one that the 
judges consider worthy of the significant honor. 

Displaying more than 4,000 roses, the Lehmann Rose 
Garden was dedicated in 1976 and is named for Anne L. 
Lehmann who, with her late husband John S. Lehmann, has 
been one of the Garden's most ardent supporters during the last 
four decades. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lehmann's support has made possible several 
significant developments at The Garden in addition to the rose 
garden, including the Gardenview Restaurant and the John S. 
Lehmann Building, now center for the world's most active 
botany programs. Mr. Lehmann was president of the Trustees 
from 1953 to 1957 Both of the Lehmanns shared a love of roses. 

The presentation was made during the recent national con- 
vention of the American Rose Society, held at the Missouri 
Botantical Garden on September 18-21. The judges cited the 
rose garden for its outstanding design and called attention to the 
care and quality of cultivation by the Garden's horticulturists and 
its Rosarian, David Vismara, as well as Vismara's predecessor 
as Rosarian, Alfred Saxdal, who has been a volunteer at the 
Garden, with his wife, since his retirement. 





Accepting the Public Rose Garden Award from the A.A.R.S. is Garden Board 
President, C. C. Johnson Spink, right. 



The Gazebo in the Lehmann Rose Garden. 



Inside 

You say the winter months stretch before you as only so 
much grey and snowy time to be gotten through until the spring 
thaw? Cheer up; the Missouri Botanical Garden has so much to 
do that winter will seem to fly by: A Victorian holiday; the holiday 
plant exhibit; the holiday plant sale; the spectacular orchid show 



not too far off; films. You could visit the tropics (in the Climatron) 
or the desert (in the Desert House); you could spend a leisurely 
hour or so in the Spink Gallery marvelling at the life-like 
porcelain sculpture there. To begin, why not take a look at what's 
inside this Bulletin, and then make this a winter to enjoy. 



Comment 



and sci 



This has been an eventful year for the 
Garden. The principal achievement for 1983 
was, of course, the creation of the botanical 
garden subdistrict of the Zoo-Museum Dis- 
trict which will allow us to continue to provide 
the high quality of services that the St. Louis 
community has come to expect from us. But 
so much more happened this year as well, 
from the continued growth of our educational 
entific programs and the development of the Garden 




throughout our 79 acres. All of the accomplishments of 1983 we 
the result of the diligence and commitment of thousands of i 
dividuals, from our Members— the number of which reached 
new high— to our staff and volunteers, to our trustees, and to tf 
voters of St. Louis who expressed their regard for us by creatir 
the subdistrict. To each and every one of these individuals, I wa 
to express heartfelt appreciation. 



QjUxQ* 



CLu-t^. 



HENRY SHAW 
ASSOCIATES 

Anonymous 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Aronson 

Mrs Newell A. Augur 

Mrs. Agnes F. Baer 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard F. Baer 

Mr and Mrs. Edward L. Bakewell. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H Bascom 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl L A Beckers 

Ms Sally J. Benson 

Mr. and Mrs. Brooks Bernhardt 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert G Blanke, Jr 

Miss Dorothy Brehm 

Miss Ruth Buerke 

Mr and Mrs. John G Buettner 

Mr and Mrs William H. T. Bush 

Mrs. J Butler Bushyhead 

Mr Jules D. Campbell 

Mrs. Jean-Jacques Carnal 

Miss Adelaide Cherbonmer 

Mrs. Fielding T. Childress 

Mr. and Mrs. Fielding L. Childress 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary A Close 

Mr. SidneyS Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin J Cornwell, Sr. 

Mrs Edwin R. Culver, Jr. 

Mrs. Elsie Ford Curby 

Dr and Mrs. William H. Danforth 

Dr. and Mrs. Morris Davidson 

Mr. Sam'l C. Davis 

Mr. Alan E. Doede 

Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Duhme, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Robert Edwards 

Mr. and Mrs. David C. Farrell 

Mrs Mary Plant Faust 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Ferring 

Mrs. Clark P Fiske 

Mr and Mrs Robert B. Forbes 

Mrs Eugene A. Freund 

Mrs. Henry L. Freund 

Mr S E. Freund 

Mr. Edward S. Funsten. Jr. 

Mr Robert Lee Funsten 

Mrs. Clark R Gamble 

Dr. and Mrs. Leigh L. Gerdine 

Mr. Samuel Goldstein 

Mr Stanley J. Goodman 

Mrs Mildred Goodwin 

Mr and Mrs. W. Ashley Gray. Jr 

Mr. and Mrs Ronald K. Greenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. W. L Hadley Griffin 

Miss Anna Hahn 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas S Hall 

Mr and Mrs. Norman W. Halls 

Mrs. Ellis H. Hamel 

The Hanley Partnership 

Mrs Marvin Harris 

Mr. and Mrs. Whitney R. Harris 

Mr. George Hasegawa 

Mrs. John H. Hayward 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvard K Hecker 

Mr. William Guy Heckman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert R Hermann 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 

Mr. John Hudson 

Mr. and Mrs Lee Hunter 

Mrs John Kenneth Hyatt 



Mr. and Mrs. Stanley F. Jackes 

Mr and Mrs. B. F. Jackson 

Mrs Margaret Mathews Jenks 

Mr and Mrs. Jack E. Jennings 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Eugene Johanson 

Mr.and Mrs. Henry O. Johnston 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Boardman Jones, Jr 

Mrs. A F. Kaeser 

Dr and Mrs. John H. Kendig 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M Kennard III 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer G Kiefer 

Mr. and Mrs. William S Knowles 

Mr. and Mrs Robert E Kresko 

Mr. and Mrs. Hal A. Kroeger, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Lamy 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver M Langenberg 

Mr. and Mrs Sam Langsdorf, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Lathrop 

Mr and Mrs John C. Lebens 

Mrs. John S Lehmann 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard L. Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley L. Lopata 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Dean Mann 

Mr. and Mrs. William E Maritz 

Mr. Harry B. Mathews III 

Mrs Roblee McCarthy 

Mrs James S McDonnell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sanford N McDonnell 

Mr. and Mrs. Roswell Messing, Jr 

Mr Lester Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. I. E. Millstone 

Mr. and Mrs. Hubert C. Moog 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Moore 

Mrs. W. Gillespie Moore 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter L. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Chapm S. Newhard 

Mr. and Mrs. Eric P. Newman 

Mr. and Mrs Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr and Mrs. Charles W. Oertli 

Mrs John M. Olm 

Mr Spencer T Olin 

Mr. and Mrs. W. R Orthwein, Jr 

Mrs. Elizabeth R. Pantaleom 

Mrs. Jane K. Pelton 

Miss Jane E. Piper 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon W Piper 

Mrs. Herman T. Pott 

Mrs. Miquette M. Potter 

Pratt Buick, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Timon Primm III 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A Richardson 

Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Robinson, Jr 

Mr. Stanley T Rolfson 

Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Rosborough, Jr. 

Mrs Lucianna Gladney Ross 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis S Sachs 

St. Louis County Water Company 

Mr and Mrs Louis E Sauer 

Mrs. William H.Schield 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Thomas F Schlafly 

Mrs. Frank H Schwaiger 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Shaikewitz 

Mrs. A. Wessel Shapleigh 

Mr. and Mrs Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mrs Thomas W. Shields 

Mrs. John M. Shoenberg 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Shoenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mrs. Tom K. Smith, Sr. 

Mr, and Mrs. Tom K Smith, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs Wallace H Smith 

Mrs. Sylvia N. Souers 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Hermann F. Spoehrer 

Mrs. Robert R. Stephens 

Mr and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mrs. Mildred E. Stifel 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon R. Strauss 

Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius F. P. Stueck 

Mr. and Mrs. Hampden M. Swift 

Mrs Martha Love Symington 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar L. Taylor, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Tooker 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Towle 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack L. Turner 

Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace 

Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Walsh, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs Hugh R. Waters 

Mrs. Horton Watkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Weil 

Mrs. S. A. Wemtraub 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben H. Wells 

Mr. and Mrs. B. K. Werner 

Mr. and Mrs. Orrm Sage Wightman III 

Mr. and Mrs Eugene F. Williams. Jr 

Mrs. John M.Wolff 

Mr and Mrs. Don L. Wolfsberger 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald D. Wren 

Miss F. A Wuellner 

Mrs. Elizabeth N Young 

Mrs. Eugene F. Zimmerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew R Zmsmeyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Sander B. Zwick 



DIRECTOR'S 
ASSOCIATES 

Anonymous 

Mrs. Arthur B. Baer 

Mr. and Mrs C Perry Bascom 

Mr and Mrs Edwin R. Breihan 

Ms. Allison R Bnghtman 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Pharr Bnghtman 

Mrs. Richard I. Brumbaugh 

Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Buder, Jr. 

Mrs. David R. Calhoun, Jr. 

Mr. Maris Circulis 

Consolidated Grain & Barge Co 

Mrs. Robert Corley 

Mr. and Mrs John L Davidson, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs Henry P. Day 

Mr. Bernard F. Desloge 

Mrs. Joseph Desloge, Sr. 

Mr and Mrs. Joseph M. Dilschneider, Jr. 

Echo Valley Foundation 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Galloway 

Mrs. Christopher C. Gibson 

Mr. and Mrs. A. William Hager 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Hedley 

Dr and Mrs. August H. Homeyer 

Mrs John Valle Janes, Sr, 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Alexander Jones 



Mr and Mrs. Roy W. Jordan 

Dr. and Mrs. David M. Kipnis 

Mr. Kenneth Kirchner 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Koplar 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldridge Lovelace 

Mr. and Mrs. David G Lupo 

Mr. and Mrs. Minard T. MacCarthy 

Mr, and Mrs. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Ben Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Shadrach F. Morris, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donn Carr Musick, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Newhard 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Nooney 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Nussbaum 

Mrs Harry E. Papin, Jr. 

Mrs. Jean M. Pennington 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B Perry 

Mrs. Drue Wilson Philpott 

Mrs. Ralph F. Piper 

Mr Dominic Ribaudo 

Mr and Mrs. Robert A. Ridgway 

Mrs. Edward J Riley, Jr 

Mrs. John R. Ruhoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M Ruprecht 

Safeco Insurance Company 

Mr. Don R. Schneeberger 

St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Co. 

Miss Lillian L Stupp 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold E. Thayer 

Mrs. Sidney B. Trelease 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas J. Von Allmen 

Mrs. Mahlon B. Wallace, Jr. 

Watlow Electric Company 

Dr. Clarence S. Weldon 

Dr. Virginia V Weldon 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Zorensky 

C. C. Johnson Spink 
President, Board of Trustees 
Mrs. Walter G. Stern, President, 
Executive Board of the Members 
Dr. Peter H. Raven 
Director 

The MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN 
BULLETIN is published seven times a 
year, in February. April, May, June, 
August, October, and December by the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower 
Grove, St. Louis, Mo. 63110. Second Class 
postage paid at St. Louis, Mo. $12 00 per 
year. $15 foreign. 

The Missouri Botanical Garden 
Bulletin is sent to every Member of the 
Garden as one of the benefits of their 
membership For a contribution as little as 
$30 per year. Members also are entitled 
to: free admission to the Garden, Shaw 
Arboretum, and Tower Grove House; in- 
vitations to special events and receptions; 
announcements of all lectures and 
classes; discounts in the Garden shops 
and for course fees; and the opportunity 
to travel, domestic and abroad, with other 
Members. For information, please call 
577-5100 

Postmaster: send address changes to PO. 
Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166 



Gardening in St. Louis 

Choosing a Christmas Tree 

Choosing the family Christmas tree is great fun, but can be 
a quite confusing job. There are so many choices! 

Everybody has their own favorite type of tree. I prefer the 
Canadian balsam since it has soft needles, attractive color, and 
a pleasant fragrance. Another fir, the Douglas fir, is also a 
beautiful tree, but tends to be more expensive. Scotch pine is 
probably the most popular Christmas tree sold. It is econom- 
ically priced, holds its needles well, but does not have a very 
strong fragrance. Unfortunately, Scotch pine, like the spruces, 
have sharp, stiff needles which, when they fall into your 
carpeting can provide a very painful experience for children and 
adults walking around the tree in stockinged or bare feet. After 
stepping on a few of these needles myself, I decided I preferred 
the "friendlier" fir trees. 

Cornell University has provided some helpful information in 
choosing trees. The chart below characterizes the various types 
of trees by their needle holding ability, their branch firmness, 
and their fragrance. 

No matter which type of tree you purchase, it is important it 
be fresh. Ask the dealer when the trees were cut. Try to buy one 
cut within the last month. Brush the tree limbs; the needles 
should be supple, not stiff and dry, and should not fall off. 
Needle color is also a good indicator for freshness. The needles 
should have a bright, clear-green, not dull grayish-green color. 

Cornell has some valuable suggestions to help guard 
against carpet stains from water spills from your tree holder and 
pitch from the tree. As you set up a tree, pick up falling needles. 
Needles allowed to remain on the carpet may exude pitch that 
will cause stains. If pitch gets on the carpet, apply a commercial 
spot-removing solvent or turpentine. Do not use carbon tetra- 
chloride, gasoline, or lighter fluid. Use a small amount of the sol- 
vent on a cloth because an excessive amount can damage the 
backing of the rug, particularly if it is latex. Then blot with clean 
white toweling or cloths. Repeat if necessary. Try the cleaner on 
a small, inconspicuous area of the carpet first to be sure that no 
color change occurs. 

As you add water to the tree holder, check carefully for spills 
and any "sweating" from the container. Blot spills immediately 
with paper towels. Place a thick padding of paper towels over 
any wet area and weight it down in order to allow the moisture to 
wick up into the toweling without stopping at the rug surface 
where it might deposit staining material soaked up from the 
backing. 



Fire Resistant Treatment for Christmas Trees 

A dried tree is a fire hazard. By treating your tree properly 
you can prevent it from drying out excessively and becoming a 
danger. These recommendations are from the Indiana State 
Fire Marshal's office. 

Ammonium Sulphate 
(fertilizer grade) ... 1 cupful (8 oz.) for each pint water 

Water 1 pint for each 2 lbs. of tree 

Directions: Make fresh cut across trunk of tree so that 
chemical will contact fresh wood. Weigh tree and use 1 pint of 
water for each 2 lbs. of tree. Make a solution by dissolving one 
cupful of ammonium sulphate for each pint of water used. Put 
solution in pan, set tree in upright position in solution, and place 
in a cool area for five days. 

The degree of fire resistance depends upon the amount of 
solution absorbed. Freshly cut trees will absorb the solution 
most readily. Fertilizer grade ammonium sulphate can be ob- 
tained at most seed, hardware, or farmers' supply stores. 



Other Safety Pointers 

• Keep the tree away from fireplaces, radiators, TV sets, and 
anything else that could dry the needles. 

• Keep candles away from the tree and use fireproof decora- 
tions and light reflectors. Do not let tinsel touch the light sockets. 

• Check all Christmas tree lights for loose connections or bare 
wires before use. Any set of lights with brittle, cracked insulation 
should be replaced rather than patched. 

• Plug in all sets of lights to detect burned out bulbs and short 
circuits before putting them on the tree. 

• Purchase only sets of Christmas tree lights that are wired in 
parallel and bear the approved label of Underwriters' Labora- 
tories. 

• Do not overload electrical circuits. For a typical home tree with 
36 bulbs, you are adding 250 watts to the circuit. A 15-amp fuse 
is capable of handling a total of 1,500 watts. If a fuse blows, it 
means that the line is overloaded or attached to defective equip- 
ment. Do not replace with a larger fuse. 

• Unplug lights when leaving the room, even for 10 minutes. 

— Steven A. Frowine, Public Horticulture Specialist 



Characteristics of Common Christmas Trees Under Room Conditions* 




Fir 






i 


Pine 






Spruce 




Douglas 
2 

1 

4 
1 


Balsam 
2 

1 

3 
1 


Austrian 


Red 


Scotch 


White 


White 


Norway Blue 


Needle Holding 
(without water) 

Needle Holding 
(with water) 

Firmness of branches 

Fragrance 


1 

1 

1 
3 


1 

1 

2 
3 


1 

1 

1 
3 


1 

1 

4 
2 


3 

2 

2 

5 


5 2 

4 1 

3 1 
3 3 


*1 = excellent; 2 = very good; 


3 = good; 4 = 


fair; 5 = poor 















Suggestions for Home Garden Center Received 




One of the most important and excit- 
ing projects ever undertaken by the 
Garden is the Home Garden Center, cur- 
rently in the planning stages. Several 



months ago, in a column in this Bulletin, 
the Garden's Director, Peter Raven, 
solicited suggestions from readers for 
the design and direction of the Center. 
Many Members have responded, some 
at length, with their ideas for the Center. 
A frequent comment in the re- 
sponses has been that the present 
Demonstration Vegetable Garden, 
located just north of the Japanese 
Garden, is an excellent feature and that it 
or a similar garden should be main- 
tained when the Home Garden Center is 
created. Other suggestions are for dis- 
plays concerning common problems 
faced by home gardeners, including 
growing plants in shade; the use of fer- 
tilizers and pest controls; composting; 
long term seed storage; the integration of 



flowers and vegetables in very small 
garden areas; and new watering 
methods. Some Members have asked for 
displays giving information on new 
developments in vegetables, different 
types of soils, the relative nutrition of dif- 
ferent vegetables, and organizations 
helpful to home gardeners. 

Members are still encouraged to 
send their ideas and suggestions for the 
Home Garden Center to the Missouri 
Botanical Garden; they may be ad- 
dressed to Home Garden Center, 
Missouri Botanical Garden, RO. Box 299, 
St. Louis, Missouri 63166. 

The planning of the Home Garden 
Center is possible through the generosity 
of Dr. Walter L. and Dorothy Mahaffey 
Moore. 




The Building Committee 

In the past decade if anything about 
the Garden has been evident it is the 
development and construction of new 
features, from the John S. Lehmann 
Building to the Japanese Garden to the 
Ridgway Center and the related develop- 
ment of the Garden's north end. A 
building program so wide-ranging and 
progressive requires careful manage- 
ment and planning. An important role in 
this is played by the five members of the 
Building and Grounds Committee of the 
Garden's Board of Trustees. According to 
4 



Louis S. Sachs, who serves as Chairman 
of the Committee in addition to his posi- 
tion as Second Vice President of the 
Board, the role of the building committee 
is to supervise construction work on 
behalf of the Trustees and to make cer- 
tain that the work meets the rigid re- 
quirements established by the Garden's 
Board and staff members. "Every aspect 
of the Garden has to be appealing be- 
cause of the nature of the institution as a 
showplace. Each building and garden 
needs to be an example of the highest 



Shovel, Hoe, Radio 

The Garden's Public Horticulture 
Specialist, Steven A. Frowine, continues 
his series of helpful radio programs as a 
guest on KMOX At Your Service during 
December. On Monday, December 5, 
from 3 to 4 p.m. he'll discuss Christmas 
tree and greens selection and care. From 
9 to 10 p.m. on Sunday, December 18, 
he'll continue that discussion. KMOX is 
1120 AM. 

Beginning in January, 1984, Supporting 
Members will no longer receive Garden 
magazine. 

quality of its kind. The Garden is a world- 
leading institution and visitors expect 
that everything will be world class," he 
says. "Our role is to make certain that 
it is." 

Pat Rich, Special Assistant to the 
Director and the staff member who coor- 
dinates construction projects at the 
Garden, says, "We're fortunate to have 
the five people we do as members of the 
committee. They have brought so much 
expertise and insight to the building pro- 
gram at the Garden that I can say the fine 
results are a direct result of their advice, 
suggestions and support. I can also say, 
without a moment's hesitation, that 
without Louis Sachs and the rest of the 
committee, the Garden would not be as 
outstanding a visitor attraction as it is 
today." 

In addition to Mr. Sachs, the commit- 
tee includes Jules D. Campbell, Marion 
K. Piper, Lucianna Gladney Ross, and 
Harry E. Wuertenbaecher, Jr. 

(Next issue, the Finance Committee 
will be featured.) 



Tower Crave House 

The charm of the Victorian holidays 
returns to the Missouri Botanical Garden 
once again this December, when visitors 
will have the chance to experience a 
Christmas like the ones Charles Dickens 
knew and wrote of. Henry Shaw's coun- 
try home, Tower Grove House, is one of 
the finest examples of restored Victorian 
mansions anywhere and during Decem- 
ber, it acquires even greater charm when 
it's decorated after the fashion of a 
Victorian Christmas. Beginning on 
December 6, it'll be complete with yule 
logs, evergreen ropes and wreaths, and 
a Christmas tree with antique ornaments. 
The house will be replete with the scents 
we all remember from our childhood: cin- 
namon, nutmeg, mace, and the un- 
mistakeable Christmas scent of natural 
evergreens. 

A candlelight tour is scheduled in the 
house for Wednesday, December 7, from 
4:30-6:30. There'll even be some tradi- 
tional holiday refreshments served in the 
Tea Room. Reservations for the candle- 
light tour are limited and should be made 
early by writing, and sending a check for 
$3 per person, to Tower Grove House, 
Missouri Botanical Garden, PO. Box 299, 
St. Louis, Missouri 63166. 

Special Christmas luncheons will also 
be served in Tower Grove House Tea 
Room on Tuesday through Thursday, 
December 13-15. Reservations are 
limited and can be made in parties of four 
or six only. Please call 577-5150 for reser- 
vations; the cost is $6.00 per person. 



Jvlusk 



Music is as much a part of the 
Christmas season as is anything, and 
there is no exception in the Garden's 
Holiday activities. Three separate con- 
certs are scheduled for the Shoenberg 
Auditorium. On December 4 at 2 p.m., 
the Madrigal Singers from Webster 
Groves Christian Church will perform. 
On December 11 at 2 p.m. Webster 
Garden's Ringers will present a concert 
of music for bells. And on December 17, 
also at 2 p.m., "Gospel Unlimited" will 
perform. For further information on these 
and any other events, contact the 
Garden's Public Relations Department at 
577-5125. 



What characterizes the December holi- 
days? Music, food, close friends, good cheer. 
There'll be all of these and more at the Missouri 
Botanical Garden during December. 

The Garden will be open 9:00 a.m. until 
4:30 p.m. every day except for Christmas, the 
only day of the year the Garden is closed. 




"My best of wishes for your merry 

Christmases and your happy New Years, 

your long lives and your true prosperities. 

Remember! Here's a final prescription 

added, 'To be taken for life.' " 

— Charles Dickens 



Trees & Cards 

Many of our Christmas traditions 
came to us from the Victorian age. Most 
notable among these, of course, is the 
Christmas tree. (Although the origin of 
the Christmas tree is earlier in history by 
some 300 years and most often attrib- 
uted to the theologian Martin Luther, it 
was during the reign of Victoria that it 
came to common use.) Another of these 
traditions is the exchange of Christmas 
cards; as a mark of the popularity of the 
tradition, consider that each year more 
than 3 billion Christmas cards are sent in 
the United States alone. 

The custom originated with a Lon- 
doner, Henry Cole, in 1843, who commis- 
sioned an artist to design a card for him 
to send to his friends. 

This year, as part of its Holiday cel- 
ebrations, the Garden will offer an exhibit 
of antique Christmas cards from the 
Hallmark Historical Collection. Many of 
the fifty cards included in the exhibit are 
more than a century old. The exhibit 
opens December 3 and runs through 
January 1. 



Plant 'Txhibit- 

The annual Holiday Plant Exhibit 
opens to the public on Saturday 
December 10 and continues through 
January 2. Featuring plants traditionally 
associated with Christmas, the exhibit 
includes poinsettias, cyclamen, white 
chrysanthemums, and Christmas cac- 
tus; it will be held in the Floral Display 
Hall. The trees in the Monsanto Hall will 
be decorated with small, white lights. 
There will also be a Christmas tree in the 
center of the Latzer Fountain outside the 
Ridgway Center. 



<^ 



Art Show 



A Holiday Art Show, featuring the 
work of 40 professional artists and crafts- 
men from the St. Louis County Art Asso- 
ciation, will be featured in the Ridgway 
Center on December 17 and 18. Works 
exhibited and for sale include water 
colors, oil paintings, pottery, woodwork, 
photographs, silk screens, and sculpture. 
Hours of the show are 9 a.m. until 4:30 
p.m. 



Special Receptions 

Members of the Garden are invited to 
two special holiday receptions. On Fri- 
day, December 9, there will be a preview 
of the Holiday Plant Show from 5:30 to 
7:30 p.m. in the Ridgway Center. Fol- 
lowing the preview, it's Friday Night at the 
Movies, Garden-style, when members 
are invited to a special screening of the 
beloved Christmas classic, Miracle on 
34th Street, starring Edmund Gwenn in 
his Academy Award winning role of Kris 
Kringle. The film is in the Shoenberg 
Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. On Saturday, it's 
Family Day, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. The 
famous Bob Kramer Marionettes present 
a "Holiday Review" at 10 in the morning. 
At 11, there will be a Holiday Cartoon 
Series featuring Pluto, Bugs Bunny, and 
Woody Woodpecker. From 11:45 until 1, 
Members are invited to visit the Holiday 
Plant Exhibit or to purchase a special 
Holiday Lunch in the Gardenview 
Restaurant. Then at 1 p.m. there is a 
showing of the movie, Hans Christian 
Anderson. 

5 



The Colors of 1984 



The New 

Missouri 

Botanical 

Garden 

Calendar 



One of the most stunning 
calendars for 1984 available 
anywhere is the Missouri 
Botanical Garden Calendar. It 
features 33 color photographs 
by Jack Jennings, whose work 
also appeared in the 1982 and 
1983 Calendars (see article 
this page). Thirteen of the pic- 
tures are a full 12 x I6V2 and 
are suitable for framing. In ad- 
dition to the stunning photog- 
raphy, the calendar is packed 
with historical notes in honor of 
the Garden's 125th anniver- 
sary that will be celebrated 
during the year. 

Missouri Botanical Garden Calendar 1984 can be an ideal 
gift for relatives, friends, and even out of town acquaintances 
and family who have heard of the Missouri Botanical Garden but 
have limited opportunity to see what is America's oldest and 
finest botanical garden. Even if they are 2,000 miles away, they 
can still enjoy the Japanese Garden, or the amazing Victoria 
waterlilies, or the restored Victorian home Tower Grove House 
through the fine photographs. 

An order blank appears at right. 




r 



YES, I want to order 

(includes postage) $ 



1984 Calendars @ $9.95 each 
total. 



Send a Calendar as my gift to: 



Mr. Mrs. Ms Miss_ 
Address 



Sign card: 




Mr. Mrs. Ms Miss_ 
Address 



Sign card: 



Mr. Mrs. Ms Miss_ 
Address 



Sign card: 



Send 



Calendars to me: 



My Name 

| (as it appears on charge plate) 

, Address 



Telephone No. 

Enclosed is my check 

Please charge: Visa No. 

MasterCard No. 
Expiration date: 
Please make checks payable to: 

Missouri Botanical Garden 



L_ 



P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166 



Monet with a Camera 



You could perhaps call Jack Jennings an amateur photog- 
rapher. But amateur in the sense that he does not make his 
living as a photographer; that it is his hobby. For if we class him 
as an amateur, then we must class him as one with the likes of 
Bobby Jones, the great golfer of the 1920s; Emil Zatopek, the 
Czechoslovakian runner who electrified the 1952 Olympics; and 
the 1980 American Olympic Hockey team who surprised the 
world by taking the gold medal. 

When it comes to photographing the Missouri Botanical 
Garden — from a panorama of the Japanese Garden to an in- 
tricate detail of a rose petal — no one is more accomplished than 
Jack Jennings, whose 33 color photographs are the highlight of 
the Garden's 1984 Calendar. His work was also featured in the 
1982 and 1983 calendars. 

Jennings first picked up a camera 25 years ago when his 
first child was born. At the time he bought a Brownie Hawkeye— 
a simple camera roughly equivalent to today's popular insta- 
matic— so that he could take snapshots of his children (he now 
has six) as they grew. He discovered that he enjoyed his new 
hobby— and more— that he was good at it. In 1966, he invested 
in a Nikon and started seriously pursuing his avocation. "At the 
time I was living in New York," he says, "and I started photo- 
graphing everything I saw— buildings, people, wildlife, plants, 
even pinball games. I always try to capture the essence of a 
place in my photographs; since I was working in Manhattan, that 
was the place I wanted to capture." 

In 1978, Jennings returned to his native St. Louis. At the time 
there was an exhibition of paintings by the great French impres- 
sionist, Claude Monet, at The St. Louis Art Museum (Monet's 
Years at Giverny). Jennings attended the exhibit. "Monet's work 
was magnificent," he says. "I wanted to see if I could do with my 
camera what he did with his paints." 

So he came to the Missouri Botanical Garden to do some 
work. "I thought I'd spend a little time there, a few months 
perhaps," he says. But he found that every time he returned to 
the Garden, it was different. "I found something new to 
photograph on every visit." So he kept returning and returning. 
Today, he estimates that he's taken 10,000 photographs at the 
Garden, in all kinds of weather and through all the seasons. 




Jack Jennings in the Japanese Garden 



He's come on pleasant and sunny spring days, but also on days 
there was no sun and everything was dulled by a grey and rainy 
sky. He's also come on days when no one else was around, in 
the middle of the raging blizzard. "Once, when I was here, the 
wind chill was minus fifty." He also comes often on early Satur- 
day mornings, at dawn. "Sometimes it's only me and the ducks 
in the Japanese Garden," he says. 

Aside from the three recent calendars, his work on the 
Garden has been featured in a slide presentation that Jennings 
takes to garden clubs and to other groups, an exhibit of photog- 
raphy at the Garden, on postcards and slides that are offered for 
sale in the Garden Gate Shop, and in the most recent Veiled 
Prophet Fair Souvenir program. 

Jennings is director of communications industry marketing 
of McDonnell Douglas Automation Company. 

He lives with his wife, Michiko, and their young daughter in 
St. Louis. 



Systematics Symposium 




With the coordinator of the 30th annual Systematics Symposium, Dr. Gerrit 
Davidse of the Missouri Botanical Garden (left), are the Symposium's featured 
speakers: (I to r) Doctors Daniel R. Brooks of the University of British Columbia, 
Peter Crane of the Field Museum of Natural History, Joel Cracraft of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois at Chicago, Donn E. Rosen of the American Museum of Natural 
History, Vicki A. Funk of the Smithsonian Institution, Edward O. Wiley of the 
University of Kansas, and Walter M. Fitch of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 



More than 400 scientists from across the United States and 
from five foreign countries participated in the 30th annual 
Systematics Symposium sponsored by the Missouri Botanical 
Garden in October. The subject this year was The Implications 
of Phylogenetic Analysis For Comparative Biology, or cladistics 
as it is known. Cladistics is a relatively new area of research that 
rigorously and precisely attempts to analyze evolutionary rela- 
tionships in plants and in animals. According to Dr. Geritt 
Davidse, coordinator of the last 12 symposia, it is a method that 
forces scientists to look at old concepts, such as the origin of 
flowering plants, in a new way. Dr. Davidse also said that this 
was one of the first Symposia anywhere in which the talks and 
discussions moved beyond purely theoretical considerations 
into practical applications of the research. 

The Garden, one of the world's leading botanical research 
institutions, has held the Symposium every year since 1954 as 
a forum for the exchange of information and ideas within the 
scientific community. It has been supported since its first year 
by the National Science Foundation. 

7 



A Fragrant Season 

I )uring the holiday season there are 
many traditional sights and sounds: 
Christmas trees with colored lights, red 
and green candles, carolers singing and 
ringing church bells. There are also 
traditional smells at Christmas. The 
fragrance of a freshly cut Christmas 
tree, turkey roasting in the oven and 
the spicy smell of Christmas cookies 
baking scent the house throughout the 
holidays 

This season, add to the fragrances 
by using spices to make something to 
give as a gift, to decorate your tree and 
to eat. 



... as a Gift: 

A Christmas Sachet! 

Sachets or scent sacks make pretty 
gifts that smell good, too. Cut a 5 inch 
square of Christmas fabric with pinking 
shears for each sachet you plan to 
make. Lay the fabric wrong side up on 
a table and fill the center of each 
square with a mixture of equal parts 
dried orange or lemon peel, broken 
stick cinnamon, and cloves. Draw the 
corners of the fabric together and tie 
with a red or green ribbon. 

... as a Decoration: 
Cinnamon and Apple 
Sauce Pomanders 

Mix together 2 parts applesauce to 
'A parts ground cinnamon. The con- 
sistency should be like play-dough, add 
more cinnamon or apple sauce as 
needed. Pat the dough out flat on a 
piece of waxed paper until about '/. 
inch thick. Use your favorite cookie 
cutters to cut out shapes. Use a 
toothpick to make a hole in the top of 
each ornament. Place the ornaments 
on a cookie sheet and dry in the oven 
at200°F. 

—Undo Sanford 
Education Department 
8 



FOR 




Apples and Cinnamon— A Holiday T^ste TVeat 



Holiday guests, as well as family 
members, will savor every bite of a 
homemade applesauce spiced with cin- 
namon. Young children can help pre- 
pare the applesauce; at the same time, 
they will be participating in a delightful 
sensory experience. 

You will need: stove, hand-cranked 
food mill, large bowl, blunt knife, long- 
handled wooden spoon, measuring 
cup and spoons, apples (one apple per 
serving), water, cinnamon, sugar. 

What to do: If possible, take your 
child to the grocery store to select fresh 
apples. Jonathon apples are a good 
selection. Rinse the apples and place 
them, one at a time, on a small cutting 
board. Help your child to safely use the 
blunt, plastic knife to cut the apples in 
half. Talk with your child about the 
seeds, remove the seeds, and cut the 
apples into small pieces. Keep the skin 
on the apples in order to give the 
applesauce a somewhat rosy color. 

Place the apple pieces into a cook- 
ing pot. Add enough water to the pot to 
partially cover the apples. As the ap- 
ples begin to heat, give your child a 
turn to stir and mash them with the 



long-handled spoon. Ask such ques- 
tions as: Do you see smoke: what do we 
call it (steam)? How does steam feel? 
What do you smell? What is the heat 
doing to the apples? Why are there 
bubbles in the water? Note the change 
from firm apple pieces to soft, mushy 
pieces. 

When the apples are quite soft, 
spoon them into the food mill which 
has been placed over a large bowl. 
Show your child how to operate the 
food mill. What is the mill doing to the 
apples? When all of the cooked apples 
have been pressed through the mill, 
you will be ready to add the sugar and 
cinnamon. Using the measuring cup. 
add Va cup sugar for every eight whole 
apples used. Measure one tablespoon 
of cinnamon for every eight whole 
apples used. Stir the ingredients 
thoroughly. 

You won't go wrong serving this 
tasty dish. And those who help you eat 
it should all agree: apples and cin- 
namon belong together. 

—Ilene Fotlman 
Education Consultant 



Did You Know . . . 

. . . that cinnamon comes from the bark of a tree? 
. . . that cloves are flower buds? 
. . . that ginger comes from a root? 
. . . that nutmeg is a seed? 



CALENDAR 

What do you think of when you think of December? Holidays, 
the warm and sweet smells of sugar cookies, the sharp scent of 
evergreen on a crisp and bright afternoon after a snow, carolers, 
best wishes. This year, think, too, of the Missouri Botanical Garden 
and consider what we have to offer you. 




December 



DECEMBER 1-10 

December 3: 

December 4: 
December 6: 

December 7: 

December 9: 

December 9-10 
December 10: 



DECEMBER 11-17 

December 11: 

December 13-15: 
December 17: 



Antique Christmas Card Exhibit, Ridgway Center, all 

day (through January 1). Come see the sorts of greetings 

your grandparents and great grandparents sent their 

friends and relatives. 

Madrigal Singers, Shoenberg Auditorium, 2 p.m. What 

is Christmas without music? The group is from Webster 

Groves Christian Church. 

Victorian Holiday, Tower Grove House (through 

December). Turn back the calendar pages a hundred 

years and roll in the Yule log for an old fashioned 

Christmas. 

Candlelight Tour of Tower Grove House, 4:30-6:30 p.m. 

This is the way that the early Victorians would have seen 

the House. There'll even be some traditional holiday 

refreshments. 

Holiday Plant Show Preview, Ridgway Center, 5:30-7:30 

p.m.A little holiday cheer and a classic film, Miracle on 

34th Street, to get you in the spirit of the season. 

Holiday Plant Sale, Garden Gate Shop, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 
p.m. 

Members' Family Day, Ridgway Center, 10 a.m. A pup- 
pet show, a film, some cartoons, and perhaps a few 
surprises. 

Holiday Plant Show, Floral Display Hall (through 
January 2). One of our biggest and most popular exhibits 
of the year. 



Webster Garden's Ringers, Shoenberg Auditorium, 2 
p.m. A concert of holiday music performed on bells. 
Holiday Luncheon, Tower Grove House. Some tradi- 
tional holiday cuisine. For information on reservations, 
see p. 5. 

Holiday Art Show, Ridgway Center (also on 12/18). 
Some arts and crafts that you might want to consider as 
gifts for those on your list. 

Brunch with Santa Claus. Gardenview Restaurant, 10 
a.m.-1 p.m. Eat and be merry, but mind your manners; 
he'll be watching and checking his list. Twice. (Also on 
12/18.) 



January 

JANUARY 1-7 

Continues: 
Closed all month: 



JANUARY 8-14 

January 11-15: 

January 14: 

JANUARY 15-21 

January 21: 



JANUARY 22-31 

January 27: 

January 28: 

Coming in 
February: 



Continues: 



DECEMBER 18-24 

Continues: 



DECEMBER 25-31 

December 25: 
Continues: 



Holiday Plant Exhibit (last day, January 2). 

Tower Grove House will be closed during January for 

maintenance and will reopen in February 

Science Fiction Festival, Ridgway Center. Films, lec- 
tures, exhibits, and perhaps some very strange crea- 
tures. 

Children's Film, Shoenberg Auditorium, noon. Title to 
be announced. 

Canterbury Days, Ridgway Center (also on 1/22). Come 
to the days of knights and fair maidens, when you could 
tell a man's character by the color of his armour. 

Orchid Show Preview, Ridgway Center. Details will be 

announced. 

1984 Orchid Show, Floral Display Hall. Visit one of the 

finest collections of orchids anywhere in the U.S. 

We'll offer a special program for the centennial of the 
death of George Engelmann (1809-1884), Henry Shaw's 
principal advisor; films; a quilt exhibit; and of course, the 
orchid show continues. 

Gospel Unlimited. Shoenberg Auditorium, 2 p.m. A con- 
cert of holiday music. 

Babes in Toyland. Shoenberg Auditorium, noon A 
movie for the children in all of us. 
Holiday Plant Show 
Victorian Holiday 

Holiday Plant Show 
Victorian Holiday 

Christmas Day: Missouri Botanical Garden closed. 
Holiday Plant Show (through January 2). 
Victorian Holiday (through December). 



Profiles in Service 

Warren Shapleigh: 25 Years of Service 




Twenty-five years ago, Dwight Ei- 
senhower was President of the U.S., and 
the flag had but 48 stars; Alan Shephard 
had not made his pioneering space flight 
and the first jet air line in the U.S. began 
a run between Miami and New York. 
Most everyone was reading the number 
one best seller, Doctor Zhivago. In St. 
Louis, the country's oldest botanical 
garden was on the threshhold of its 
centennial year. 

The same year, Warren McKinley 
Shapleigh joined the Board of Trustees of 
that century-old garden; for the past 
quarter-century he has served enthu- 
siastically as a member of that Board. 
During the entire 125 year history of the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, only eight 
men have been active trustees for as 
long or longer than Warren Shapleigh 
(see box). 

He has seen, in that time, and been 
an important part of, the most active 
period of development in the Garden's 
existence. Since 1958, the Climatron was 
built; as were the John S. Lehmann 
Building, the Anne L. Lehmann Rose 
Garden, the English Woodland Garden, 
the Japanese Garden, and the Ridgway 
Center. The education program has 
grown enormously and the Garden's 
research program has become one of 
the most significant botanical programs 
anywhere in the world. "Today the 
Garden is providing greater service to the 
community than at any other time in its 
history," he said. But of all of these 
developments, he cited the recent crea- 
tion of the Botanical Garden Subdistrict 
in the Zoo Museum Tax District as the 
most significant single accomplishment. 
"The revenue from the tax district pro- 
10 



vides a comfortable base for the 
Garden's financial future. Without it, 
maintaining the facilities and providing 
the number and the quality of services 
that the community has come to expect 
would be impossible," he said. 

It was the Garden's reputation and 
potential for service that piqued his in- 
terest in becoming a trustee in the late 
1950s. But his decision finally resulted 
from his feeling that his background and 
abilities would enhance the Garden's 
operations. "I've always felt that the 
Garden was a great asset to the com- 
munity. I joined the Trustees because at 
the time and just by circumstances I was 
able to make a contribution to the institu- 
tion," he said. 

As for what he enjoys most about his 
work as a trustee, he pointed to the high 
calibre of individuals who are and have 
been trustees during his tenure. He also 
said, "I've especially enjoyed working on 
the financial aspects of the Garden's 
operation; I've liked seeing that the 
results of our financial management 
have been very, very good." For a 
number of years, he served as chairman 
of the Board's Finance Committee, and 
he still is a member of that committee, as 
well as the Executive, Future Planning, 
and Nominating committees. 

Mr. Shapleigh is retired President of 
the Ralston Purina Company of St. Louis 
and a graduate of Yale University. He has 
served on the Boards of Ralston Purina, 
Missouri Pacific Railroad, Morgan 
Guaranty Trust Co. of New York, Brown 
Group, Inc., and First National Bank, St. 
Louis. He also has been a Board Mem- 
ber of the St. Louis Regional Commerce 
and Growth Association, the Brookings 
Institution, Washington University, and 
the Jefferson National Expansion 
Memorial Association. 



TRUSTEES WITH 25 YEARS OR MORE 


ACTIVE SERVICE 






Years 


Dates 




Active 


Active 


Trustees 


Service 


Service 


George Hitchcock 


44 


1903-1947 


William H. H. Pettus 


33 


1889-1922 


Daniel Catlin 


28 


1926-1964 


Leonard Matthews 


28 


1895-1923 


John Shepley 


28 


1901-1929 


Henry Hitchcock 


27 


1947-1974 


Edward Eliot 


25 


1903-1928 


George Moore 


25 


1929-1954 


Warren Shapleigh 


25 


1958- 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

C. C. Johnson Spink, President 

William R. Orthwein, Jr., First Vice-President 

Louis S. Sachs, Second Vice-President 

Mr. Clarence C Barksdale 

Mr Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. John H. Biggs 

Mr William H . T. Bush 

Mr. Robert R. Hermann 

Mr. Robert E. Kresko 

Mr. Stephen H. Loeb 

Mr. William E. Maritz 

Mr James S. McDonnell III 

Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 

Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

Dr. Howard A. Schneiderman 

Mr. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr 

Mr. Tom K Smith. Jr 

Mr John K.Wallace. Jr. 

Mr Robert C West 

Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher, Jr. 



EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Mr Sam'IC. Davis 

Dr. Thomas S. Hall 

Mr Henry Hitchcock 

Mr. A. Timon Primm III 

Mr. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Robert Brookings Smith 

EX OFFICIO TRUSTEES 

Mr Nathaniel Johnson 
President, St. Louis Board of Education 

Mr. Jules D. Campbell 

President, St. Louis Academy of Science 

Dr. William H. Danforth 

Chancellor. Washington University 

The Rev Thomas R. Fitzgerald. S.J 

President, St Louis University 

The Rt. Rev. Wm A. Jones, Jr 

Episcopal Bishop of Missouri 

The Honorable Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr 

Mayor, City of St Louis 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 
OF THE MEMBERS 

OFFICERS 

Mrs. Walter G Stern. President 

Mrs. Rudyard Rapp, First Vice-President 

Mrs Pednck Conway, Second Vice-President 

Mrs. Bruce R. Yoder. Secretary 

Mrs Charles Cook, Treasurer 



The Tribute Fund of the Missouri Bo- 
tanical Garden is an excellent way to 
recognize the special people and events 
in your life. Contributions have been 
made by Members in the past to honor 
their friends or relatives on their birth- 
days, anniversaries, graduations. Con- 
tributions have also been made in 
memory of parents, grandparents, and 
other relatives. For information about the 
Tribute Fund, contact the Development 
Office at 577-5120 



Spink Gallery— Wonder in Porcelain 



One of the most stunning collections 
of porcelain sculpture anywhere is ex- 
hibited in the Spink Gallery of the 
Ridgway Center. Featuring work by the 
great Edward Marshall Boehm and the 
Boehm Studios, the gallery is open from 
10 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. daily. Why not take 
a Saturday or Sunday afternoon, come 
to the Garden for lunch or brunch, and 
spend some time in the gallery? 




Tower Grove House Cook Book Reissued 




In celebration of the 125th anniver- 
sary of the founding of the Missouri 
Botanical Garden, the Shaw House Cook 
Book, originally published in 1963, has 
been reprinted. The book contains hun- 
dreds of choice recipes from a Golden 
Era of St. Louis living as well as amusing 
anecdotes of Henry Shaw's time. The 
new edition will have a new cover and 
new pictures and will be available in time 
for Christmas giving. Call Tower Grove 
House, 577-5150, for information. To whet 
your appetite (literally) we give you two 
recipes from the book which are par- 
ticularly appropriate for the season. 



From the Shaw House Cook Book 
English Plum Pudding 

1 /2 lb. fine bread crumbs 

1 lb. brown sugar 

2 cups sweet milk 

1 lb. beef suet, chopped fine 

2 lbs. currants 
2 lbs. raisins 

1 lb. almonds, slivered 

1/2 lb. flour 

1 lb. citron, orange and lemon peel 

8 tbsp. ground spices 

9 eggs, separated 

Have ready a pot of boiling water, put 
an old plate in the bottom of the kettle to 
keep the pudding from burning. Wring 
out a large square piece of cloth in cold 
water and flour well. Put the mound of 
pudding in the center, bring the corners 
up and tie loosely with string. Drop into 
boiling water and boil 6 hours. 

Editor's Note: This pudding may be 
packed into an oiled pudding mold, 
covered tightly with aluminum foil, set on 



a trivet in a kettle, water added to half its 
depth, the kettle covered, and the pud- 
ding steamed for about 3 hours. Fine for 
gifts, if made in copper molds. 

Egg Nog 

14 eggs, separated 
3 1 /2 cups good bourbon 
2 cups powdered sugar 
1 /2 cup light, fragrant rum 
4 qts. coffee cream 
2 cups powdered sugar 
nutmeg to taste 

Beat the egg yolks in a large bowl 
until smooth and thick. Dribble in the 
bourbon slowly, while beating, so that the 
liquor cooks the eggs. Add the 2 cups 
powdered sugar slowly and blend until 
smooth as satin. Now beat in the rum 
and cream. Beat the egg whites until stiff 
but not dry, then fold in the last 2 cups 
powdered sugar until well blended. Stir 
this into the yolk mixture and top with 
freshly grated nutmeg. Makes about 40 
cups. 

11 



Notes from the Garden 



CV r 




With President Karl Carstens of the Federal Republic of Germany (standing at right) are William R. 
Orthwein, Jr. (I), First Vice President of the Garden's Board of Trustees, and Peter H. Raven, Director of the 
Garden. 



In October, the Garden was exceedingly 
honored to host Karl Carstens, President 
of the Federal Republic of Germany. 
President Carstens was in St. Louis as 
part of a national celebration honoring 
three centuries of German influence in 
America. To mark the occasion, he 
planted a linden (also known as bass- 
wood) at the Garden's south end, near 
the Administration Building. His visit to 
the Garden was appropriate since it was 
a German immigrant, Dr. George 
Engelmann, who was responsible for the 
shaping of the Garden's scientific 



research program. Engelmann was born 
in 1809 at Frankfurt-am-Main. After re- 
ceiving his degree from the University of 
Heidelberg, he came to the United States 
in 1833, finally settling in the St. Louis 
area in 1835. During his early years, he 
did extensive botanical exploration of the 
American west. His botanical work even- 
tually made him one of the foremost 
botanists in the history of the U.S. In the 
1850s he laid the groundwork for the 
botany program at the Missouri Botanical 
Garden. Today that program is the most 
active in the world 



Visit the Largest Orchid Show in the World! 



March 5-March 9, 1984 

Steven Frowine, Public Horticulture 
Specialist, who is a specialist in orchids, 
will lead a tour to the Eleventh World 
Orchid Congress in Miami. While in the 
Miami area, other sites will be visited in- 
cluding a special tour of a beautiful 
private garden estate, Fairchild Tropical 
Garden, and Redland Fruit and Spice 
Park. Orchid and tropical plot nurseries 
will also be visited so you can bring home 
some unique plants for your own win- 
dowsill or greenhouse. For more details 
contact the Education Department at 
577-5140 

12 




One of the Garden's most popular exhibits 
of the year, the Orchid Show, opens on 
January 28. There will be a Members- 
only preview on January 27; watch the 
mail for further information 



Venite in Italia 

Come to Italy: study the skies studied 
by Galileo, walk the ground walked by 
Ceasar, find the beauty and majesty that 
inspired so great an artist as Michel- 
angelo, explore the land that spawned 
Christopher Columbus, Sebastian 
Cabot, and Amerigo Vespucci. 

From April 29 until May 14, Members 
of the Missouri Botanical Garden will 
have the chance to journey to Italy, birth- 
place of the Renaissance. They'll see 
formal gardens, cathedrals, sixteenth 
century villas, and museums. They'll 
dine with countesses, and tour a ca- 
thedral founded 1300 years ago, even 
before the days of the Holy Roman Em- 
pire. (Remember that from your history 
book?) 

This tour provides one of the grand- 
est travel opportunities of the coming 
year offered anywhere; if you're in- 
terested, we suggest you make your 
reservations early, since we expect this 
tour to be extremely popular. 

If you want further information or to 
make reservations, contact Judy Peil 
Travel at 726-2577 




^^ 



V 



^ 



Sue Strommen 
Sue Strommen has recently joined the 
staff of the Missouri Botanical Garden as 
Manager of Public Relations. She was 
previously Manager of Public Relations 
of Bi-State Development Agency. Prior 
to joining Bi-State, she worked as a 
Writer/Editor with the St. Louis Board of 
Education and was formerly Advertising 
Manager of the Huge Corporation. She 
has a Masters degree from Webster 
University; her undergraduate degree is 
from the University of South Dakota. . . 




Nathaniel Jonnson 



Nathaniel Johnson, recently elected as 
President of the St. Louis School Board, 
is also— by virtue of that position— a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Missouri Botanical Garden. He succeeds 
Penelope Alcott. A graduate of Prairie 
View State College in Texas, Mr. Johnson 
has been a member of the Board of Ed- 
ucation since 1979. He has been a fed- 
eral food inspector for the past 27 years. 
Mr. Johnson is one of the six ex-officio 
trustees on the Garden's Board 




William H. J. Bush 



The Garden now has stronger ties with 
one of the Midwest's premier private 
universities, St. Louis University. William 
H. T. Bush, a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the Missouri Botanical 
Garden, was elected chairman of the 




Heverend Thomas R. Fitzgerald S.J. 



University's Board. Formal ties between 
the Garden and the University were 
established in 1981, when the Presi- 
dent of St. Louis University, Reverend 
Thomas R. Fitzgerald S.J., became an 
ex officio trustee of the Garden 




Julian A. Steyermark 

Probably no single person has con- 
tributed more to our knowledge of the 
plants of Missouri than Julian A. Steyer- 
mark. His interests in the flora of the state 
began during his boyhood in his native 
St. Louis, and his first paper on the flora 
of Missouri appeared in the mid 1930s. It 
was not until nearly 30 years later that he 
had accumulated sufficient information, 
much of it gathered on weekend trips 
from Chicago where he was living, to 
publish his monumental Flora of 
Missouri, which appeared in 1963. After 
an absence of nearly 50 years, Dr. 
Steyermark will return to St. Louis next 
spring to join the staff of his alma mater, 



the Missouri Botanical Garden, as a 
Curator in the Herbarium. He has spent 
the last 25 years at the Instituto Botanico, 
Caracas, involved with the botanical ex- 
ploration of Venezuela. 

Dr. Steyermark received his under- 
graduate education at Washington 
University, receiving a bachelor's degree 
in 1929. He received his master's degree 
in 1930 and his Ph.D. in 1933 from the 
same institution, working under the 
direction of Dr. Jesse M. Greenman, then 
Curator of the Garden's Herbarium. He 
was a research assistant at the Garden 
from 1934-1935, during which time he 
participated in one of our early plant col- 
lecting expeditions to Panama. That trip 
must have whet his appetite for the 
tropics, because he has maintained a 
life-long interest in tropical floras. He 
joined that staff of the Field Museum, 
Chicago, as curator in the Botany Depart- 
ment and remained there from 1937 until 
1959. He is co-author of the Flora of 
Guatemala, a long-term project of the 
Field Museum, which was completed in 
1977. It was during his years at the Field 
Museum that he developed an interest in 
Venezuela, and he left Chicago for 
Caracas in 1959. His main research in- 
terests for the past decade or so have 
been the publication of the Flora de 
Venezuela, several volumes of which he 
has authored. After returning to St. Louis, 
he will continue to work on the 
Venezuelan flora, and, we hope, renew 



his interest in the flora of Missouri. 

Dr. Steyermark has had a long 
interest in conservation and was 
instrumental in the foundation of the 
Missouri chapter of the Nature Conser- 
vancy. In 1979 the Department of Conser- 
vation named a woodland near Hannibal 
for him. 

Other honors over the years include 
the Henry Shaw Medal from the Garden 
in 1979, the Order of the Quetzal from 
Guatemala, 1958, the Order of Andres 
Bello, 1974, and the Order of Henri Pittier 
from Venezeula. In 1955 he received a 
plaque for special botanical achievement 
from Washington university. He has been 
a Honorary Research Associate at the 
Garden since 1948 and a Honorary 
Curator since 1980. Marshall R. Crosby 
Director of Research 



The Trustees, staff, and volunteers 
of the Missouri Botanical Garden were 
saddened to learn recently of the 
death of Isabelle Bonsack Campbell. 
She was a long-time and dear friend of 
the Garden, and the wife of Jules D. 
Campbell, a member of the Garden's 
Board of Trustees since 1970. Mrs. 
Campbell was a graduate of Mary In- 
stitute and of Washington University in 
1933 and served as a member of the 
50th anniversary class reunion com- 
mittee earlier this year. She will be 
sadly missed. 



13 







The John S. Swift Walk now provides direct access between the Linnean House (in background of top 
photograph) and the three lily pools east of the Climatron. 




New 
Members 

September-October 1983 

Contributing Members 

Mr. W. R. Armbruster 

The George D Barnard Company 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Bean 

Dorothy E. Bergmann 

Mrs Howard G. Beumer 

Mrs George T. Bidleman 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold G Blatt 

Mrs. Patricia Brown 

Dr. Juan Carden 

Mrs. Ann S. Cranwell 

Mrs H M. Dmzler 

Mr. and Mrs William J. Eckert 

Mr Thomas A. Edgar 

Mrs. Simone J. Feron 

Rachel Garcia 

Ms. Margaret S. Garner 

Mrs. Velma M Heilman 

Mrs. Louis A. Hoerr II 

Mr. Michael J. Hogan 

Mr. Timothy J. Hoog 

Mtss Brenda S. Johnson 

Mr. A. E. Jones, Jr. 

Mrs Jeanette Klaus 

Mr. E. L. Khck 

Dr Ira J. Kodner 

Mr and Mrs. James Kriegshauser 

Susan M. Lancaster 

Teresa A. Lane 

Mrs. Dolores Longworth 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Moore 

Maria A. Murphy 

Obata Design, Inc. 

Christine K. Owens 

Mrs. Anna Politte 

Helen M. Ravanno 

Mr. James C Roberts 

Mr. and Mrs. Gideon H. Schiller 

Mr. and Mrs. Larsen E Scott 

Earl W. Shelton 

Michael Unger 

Beverly Vunesky 

Ms. Fran Wolf 

Sustaining Members 

Mrs. Rolla J. Gittms 

Laura C. Guy 

Mr. and Mrs. James L Hoagland 

Mr. Ray Kruse 

Mr. Ralph Lilienkamp 

Ms. Barbara Pepper 

Sponsoring Members 

Mr. and Mrs William W. Canfield 



Zerogee (at left) by Minnesota artist Paul T. 
Granlund was installed recently near the Climatron, 
and was made possible by a gift in memory of Cora 
O. Latzer by her grandchildren. Shown with the artist 
are Mrs. Latzer's daughters, Ruth Donnell (center) 
and Jane Schott (right). 



Increased Support 



Contributing Members 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan S Atkins 

Mr. D. N Bentrup 

Mr. and Mrs. William Bernoudy 

Mr. and Mrs. Riley O. Bowlin III 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Bunce 

Ms. Cheryl Cavallo 

Mr. and Mrs. Basil C. Cole 

Mrs. Jess W. Cole 

Mr. Paul D. Crone, Sr 

Mrs. Veronica S Dougherty 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul W Edwards 

Miss Leona Ellermann 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin E Gardner, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard G Glover 

Mrs. Ann Goddard 

Mr. and Mrs. L J. Grigsby 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Guirl 

Mrs. Marjone H. Hankins 

Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Harris 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hegedus 

Mr. and Mrs. Raiph Hermon 

Dr. and Mrs. Albert E Hesker 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hinton 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Hoftman 

Mrs Jack Holmes 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Hormell 

Mr. and Mrs John E. Jones 

Ms. Mary Anne Jorgen 

Mr. and Mrs Charles W. Kehoe 

Mr. Walter Knoll 

Miss Catherine R. Koch 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Koch 

Mr. Gregory W. Kulla 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kutta 



Mrs. M. Lewis 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin M Liebman 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome T Loeb 

Dr. Marshall S. Manne 

Ms. Roberta Marentette 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Markow 

Mrs. Harold E McCann 

C. Michael McDonnell 

Helene McLeese SL 



(continued on next page) 



14 



Increased Support 

(continued from page 14) 



Mr. and Mrs. Milton Mill 

Dr. Anthony R. Montebello 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Moore, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Morriss. Jr. 

Nicolette Papanek 

Miss Pat Payton 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce C. Powers 

Mr. and Mrs. George Rankey, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Roulston 

Dr. and Mrs. Ernest T. Rouse III 

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Sakaguchi 

Miss Martha M. Schermann 

Dr and Mrs. Howard A. Schneiderman 



Mr. and Mrs. James Shaw. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Sido 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J Smith 

Mr. R. A. Spann 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank K. Spinner 

Dr. and Mrs. James C Steele 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Stranquist 

Mr. Bryan F. Swindoll 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Thoenen 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald P. Thomasson 

Dr and Mrs. Harold E. Turner 

Mrs. Sherwood R. Volkman 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl J. Wangler 

Dr. and Mrs. Terry D Weiss 

Mr. and Mrs. Claus H. Werner 

Lorraine Wilker 

Mr. and Mrs. Byron L. Williams, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. James D. Wilson 
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon R. Wood 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Woratzeck 
Mrs. Hildegarde Wunderlich 
Mr. Frank E. Zerillo 
Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand B. Zienty 

Sustaining Members 

Mr. Stephen S. Adams 

Mr. Ralph Blackwell 

Mr. and Mrs. J S Braden 

Mrs. Joyce M. Broughton 

Dr. and Mrs. Ralph Copp 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph L. Countryman, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Cumming 

Miss Bertha Deutsch 

Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Fons 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W Freeman 



Mrs. Milton H. Just 

Mrs. James J. Kerley 

Mr. Lawrence M. Kliewer 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J Kozacka 

Mr. Michael Lackey 

Mr. Tobias Lewin 

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben M. Morriss, Jr. 

Mr. Charles A. Mueller 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Niebur 

Ms. Barbara A. Rubinelli 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Schmidt, Jr 

Dr. and Mrs. James V. Vest 

Mr Jack L. Williams 

Sponsoring Members 

Mr Charles A Dill 

Mr and Mrs. Leo E. Eickhott 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond W. Peters II 



Tributes 

September-October 1983 



IN HONOR OF: 

Mr. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Industrial Relations Association of 

St. Louis 
Mr.and Mrs. Raymond A. 

Bodamer 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugo H. Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert Hadderleld 
EllaTappmeyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacque Harvey 
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Mayes 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Hornig 
Mr. and Mrs. Lew Ensor 
Fay Krause 
Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 
Sonya Slassberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lowenhaupt 
Rose Zimmerman 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 

IN MEMORY OF: 

John R. Averill 

Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Bainter 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Blair 

Mrs. Arthur F. Boettcher, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Bond 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Marshall Caster 

Mrs. Carrie Forester 

Mr. H. V Gausmann 

Mildred L. Gausmann 

Mary Greensfelder 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Holmes 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Horan 

M Alexander Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy W. Jordan 

M B. Kleinschmidt 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lamy 

Virginia H. MacDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. William B. MacLeod 

Mr and Mrs. Dayton Mudd 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Robert Pommer 

Mrs. Betty Samuelson 

June Vandergrift 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan R Vesper 

Mrs. Frank Viviano 

The Forrest Von Brecht Family 

Mr and Mrs D T. Woerner 

Hannah Bennett 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Mayes 
Mrs. Odessa Blackburn 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Purk 
William A. Borders 
Mr. and Mrs. Stuart G. Hill 
Mrs. W Gillespie Moore 
Mr. Herman Bowmar 
Paula Bowmar 
Gertrude M. Buerke 
George A. Buerke 
Miss Ruth E. Buerke 



Mrs. Mary S. Burton 

Mrs Kenneth H. Bitting 

Mr and Mrs. Robert L. Blank, Jr. 

Mr and Mrs. Tom S. Eakin, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stuart M. Mertz 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Reck, Jr. 

Mr. George Busch 

Mrs. Marion G. Parker 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Cabell 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest A. Eddy, Jr. 
Isabelle B. Campbell 
Executive Board of Members 
Mr. William F. Cann, Sr. 
Mrs. Harry Greensfelder, Jr. 
Edward Cartlidge, Sr. 
Mrs. Mabel McSkimming 
Mrs. Teresa Cavataio 
Mr, and Mrs. Walter R. Dunn 
Mrs. John G. Clarke 
Dr. and Mrs. Adolph C. Lange 
Mrs. Olga Cooper 
Mrs. Jean S. Bloch 

Dorothy Deam 

Jean D Gray 

Nicky and Barbara DeTournay 

Mrs CecileStubbs 
Mrs. Louise Dill 

Mrs. Jean-Jacques Carnal 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Ernest A. Eddy, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ingram Boyd 
Mrs. Jean-Jacques Carnal 
Mrs. Leicester B Faust 

H. Donald Fortner 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 
David Frelich 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Talcoff 

John Wesley Glenn 

Mrs. E. X. Boeschenstein 

Helen Conners 

Mrs. Marie P. Cook 

Jane Coultas 

Mrs. William T Dettmann 

Mrs. Ben L. Donaldson 

Mrs. Sue Ellis 

Mrs. Ralph Geer 

Mrs. Edward W. Hill 

Mr. Roland Jester 

Mrs. J. C Kraus 

Mrs Kathenne W. Kruse 

Carla Lange 

Mildred Long 

Mrs. Richard J. Mannebach 

Mrs. Joseph H. Meis 

Mr. Paul S. Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Purk 

Miss Jean Read 

Mrs. Boyd Rogers 

Mrs. Dan D. Schopp 

Mrs. Mary Schroeder 

Mrs. Victor A. Silber 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Nancy Hagemann 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Blanke. Jr. 
Mrs. Robert Burnett 



Harold Harvey 

Corliss Gigax 

Elinor Townsend Hayward 

Mrs. Dorothy V. Leake 

Mark Hennelly 

Corliss Gigax 

Mrs. Harry Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Blomberg 

Mrs. John Wm. Huntman 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Russell 

Mr. Oscar Johnson 

Mrs. John Macrae, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Wight 

Mr. Melvin E. Justus 

Alpha Alumnae, Phi Tau Omega 

Miss Aurelia Voelker 

Mr. Robert Kelly, Jr. 

Executive Board of Members 
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Wallace J. Kletzker 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A Clark 

Florence Knowlton 

Mrs Howard J Wilkinson. Jr. 

Cora Owlett Latzer 

Elizabeth D. Morrison 

Mrs. James T. Lester 

Mrs and Mrs Joseph W. Boyle 

Mr. Harry Levin 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 

Mrs Ben H. Senturia 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 

Miss F. Eugenia Maddox 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Purk 

Mr. John McCrae 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 

Mrs. Irma Moog 

Mr. and Mrs Peter H. Husch 

Mrs. Shadrach Morris, Sr. 

Mrs Elizabeth H O'Herin 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Parker Smith 

Isaac C. Orr 

Mr. James M. Canavan 

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Canavan, Jr. 

J. Overton Fry 

Mrs. Carl E. Lischer 

Anna Beall Reading 

Karin Hayward 

Mrs. Florence Rich 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Rosenthal 

Sydell Shayer 

Staff and Office of Dr. Leslie Rich 

Mrs. Mary Kathleen Roesler 

Ruth Bohnert 

Nancy Elswick 

Martha Perry 

James Porcarelli 

Janet Singer 

Donna Suda 

Mark Adam Roth 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Martin 

Marilyn Salzman s Father 

Mr and Mrs. H M. Talcoff 

Mrs. Alma Schumann 

Melba Aufderheide 

Milton J. Scott 

Mrs. RuthT. Rice 



Mrs. Jacqueline Thompson 
Seward 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Blanke, Jr. 

Mrs. James E. Crawford 

Mrs. William H.Cunlifl 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakin, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest A. Eddy, Jr 

Mrs. Prince A. Gardner 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Hall 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Horan 

Mrs E. R. Hurd, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs Elmer G Kiefer 

Mrs. Wilfred F Long 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Leighton Morrill 

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Orthwem. Jr. 

Mrs. Theodore Schroth 

Nancy Smith 

Mrs. Elmer Kulla 

Mr. Charles Stephens 

Mr. and Mrs. James Hudson Jones 

Mr and Mrs. H. Parker Smith 

Mr. Gary Stern 

Haldan Cohn 

Phyllis Lugger 

Mrs. Audrey B. Stewart 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred M. Carrey 

Libba Crisler 

Mr. Ray Deaton 

Josephine M. Hooper 

Charlotte B Leu 

Helen A. Mardorf 

McDonnell Douglas Astronautics 

Company, Dept. F300m M/S 103 
McDonnell Douglas Astronautics 

Company, Personnel, MDAC-Flonda 
Mrs. Lawrence Miller 
Maxine Niehoff 
Mr. and Mrs. James Orling 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Post 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth L. Roberts 
Henrietta Schwarze 
Miss Lucy M. Schwienher 
Laura Sewell 
John H. Stewart 
Mr. and Mrs. John H Stewart 
Francis Stone 
Union Garden Club 
Thelma Supulver 
Christina and Cynthia Carter 
Ernest R. Swanson 
Mrs. Robert O McGregor 
Charles Raymond Vosburgh 
Mr and Mrs. Earl A. Ginter 
Blanche Wachtel 
Mr. and Mrs. H. M Talcoff 
Robert Weiss 
Bernice Hall 
Lucille Kramer 

Mr. Whitfield Carlyle Wharton, Jr. 
Mrs. Clark R Gamble 
Mr. and Mrs Harvard Hecker 
Mrs. J. G Hedberg 
Mrs. J. Edgar Withrow 
Mrs. M. S. Wilson 
Mr and Mrs Ernest Karandjeff, Jr. and 

Family 
Nelle C. Winkelmeyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Everett Kling 



15 






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MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN-0026-6507) 

P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST. LOUIS, MO. 



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